Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Assume I have a template (called ExampleTemplate) that takes two arguments: a container type (e.g. list, vector) and a contained type (e.g. float, bool, etc). Since containers are in fact templates, this template has a template param. This is what I had to write:

#include <vector>
#include <list>

using namespace std;

template < template <class,class> class C, typename T>
class ExampleTemplate {
    C<T,allocator<T> > items;
public:
    ....
};

main()
{
    ExampleTemplate<list,int> a;
    ExampleTemplate<vector,float> b;
}

You may ask what is the "allocator" thing about. Well, Initially, I tried the obvious thing...

template < template <class> class C, typename T>
class ExampleTemplate {
    C<T> items;
};

...but I unfortunately found out that the default argument of the allocator...

   vector<T, Alloc>
   list<T, Alloc>
   etc

...had to be explicitely "reserved" in the template declaration. This, as you can see, makes the code uglier, and forces me to reproduce the default values of the template arguments (in this case, the allocator).

Which is BAD.

EDIT: The question is not about the specific problem of containers - it is about "Default values in templates with template arguments", and the above is just an example. Answers depending on the knowledge that STL containers have a "::value_type" are not what I am after. Think of the generic problem: if I need to use a template argument C in a template ExampleTemplate, then in the body of ExampleTemplate, do I have to reproduce the default arguments of C when I use it? If I have to, doesn't that introduce unnecessary repetition and other problems (in this case, where C is an STL container, portability issues - e.g. "allocator" )?

share|improve this question
    
It gets worse, your code doesn’t work on all compilers since the standard library containers may have (and do, in some implementations) even more template arguments with standard values. This code is effectively not portable. –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 14 '11 at 16:57
    
Agreed. I do hope I won't have to resort to macros... God, anything but macros... –  ttsiodras Mar 14 '11 at 16:59
    
If you gave us a little more insight into what you're actually trying to do, it might help to branch out of your very specific question. What you're asking for is not possible. –  Mike Mar 14 '11 at 17:10
    
@Mike: "What I am asking for is not possible" - if I understand correctly, you mean that when I pass a template argument C to a template (MyExample), in the body of MyExample I will have to manually reproduce the default arguments of C. Is that what you are saying? –  ttsiodras Mar 14 '11 at 17:14
    
@Konrad, I thought extra template arguments weren't allowed precisely because of this use case with template template parameters. –  Rob Kennedy Mar 14 '11 at 18:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Perhaps you'd prefer this:

#include <vector>
#include <list>

using namespace std;

template <class Container>
class ForExamplePurposes {
    typedef typename Container::value_type T;
    Container items;
public:
};

int main()
{
    ForExamplePurposes< list<int> > a;
    ForExamplePurposes< vector<float> > b;
}

This uses "static duck typing". It is also a bit more flexible as it doesn't force the Container type to support STL's Allocator concept.


Perhaps using the type traits idiom can give you a way out:

#include <vector>
#include <list>

using namespace std;

struct MyFunkyContainer
{
    typedef int funky_type;
    // ... rest of custom container declaration
};

// General case assumes STL-compatible container
template <class Container>
struct ValueTypeOf
{
    typedef typename Container::value_type type;
};

// Specialization for MyFunkyContainer
template <>
struct ValueTypeOf<MyFunkyContainer>
{
    typedef MyFunkyContainer::funky_type type;
};


template <class Container>
class ForExamplePurposes {
    typedef typename ValueTypeOf<Container>::type T;
    Container items;
public:
};

int main()
{
    ForExamplePurposes< list<int> > a;
    ForExamplePurposes< vector<float> > b;
    ForExamplePurposes< MyFunkyContainer > c;
}

Someone who wants to use ForExamplePurposes with a non-STL-compliant container would need to specialize the ValueTypeOf traits class.

share|improve this answer
    
This depends on the knowledge that STL containers can provide access to the contained type via ::value_type. Thanks, but the above was just an example - think about the generic problem, where you have no such "shortcut", and need to pass a template to a template. Is there no way to do it without manually reproducing the default arguments? –  ttsiodras Mar 14 '11 at 17:03
    
@ttsiofras: FYI, all STL containers are required by the standard to define the value_type nested type. –  Emile Cormier Mar 14 '11 at 17:08
    
Agreed, but again, my question was not about STL containers (that was just an example). It is about template arguments to templates. –  ttsiodras Mar 14 '11 at 17:11
    
@ttsiodras: I think you need to think of a different example and append it your question (leave the old example there, so that people don't think I'm nuts). –  Emile Cormier Mar 14 '11 at 17:16
    
@ttsiodras: I've thought of another trick that might give you a way out. See updated answer. –  Emile Cormier Mar 14 '11 at 17:31

I would propose to create adapters.

Your class should be created with the exact level of personalization that is required by the class:

template <template <class> C, template T>
class Example
{
  typedef T Type;
  typedef C<T> Container;
};

EDIT: attempting to provide more is nice, but doomed to fail, look at the various expansions:

  • std::vector<T>: std::vector<T, std::allocator<T>>
  • std::stack<T>: std::stack<T, std::deque<T>>
  • std::set<T>: std::set<T, std::less<T>, std::allocator<T>>

The second is an adapter, and so does not take an allocator, and the third does not have the same arity. You need therefore to put the onus on the user.

If a user wishes to use it with a type that does not respect the expressed arity, then the simplest way for him is to provide (locally) an adapter:

template <typename T>
using Vector = std::vector<T>; // C++0x

Example<Vector, bool> example;

I am wondering about the use of parameter packs (variadic templates) here... I don't know if declaring C as template <class...> C would do the trick or if the compiler would require a variadic class then.

share|improve this answer
    
I must be missing something - Matthieu, I can't see how your first code section would compile, since if I pass Example<list,int>, I will get a compilation error at the C<T> instantiation. –  ttsiodras Mar 14 '11 at 18:20
    
@ttsiodras: it's a single example :) Indeed the first example is not usable as is, but the issue is more general. You cannot guess the default template parameters, for example, for a stack, the default instanciation would be std::stack<T, std::deque<T>>, note how the second parameter is not a std::allocator<T> ? Therefore, you need to ask the user to provide a class that fits, and it is her responsability to do so. The second part shows the C++0x to accomplish it easily, using the aliasing of templates. –  Matthieu M. Mar 14 '11 at 19:56
    
@ttsiodras: I've edited to make it clearer, and expose the issues that wanting to be 'nice' pose. It's annoying that it does not work out of the box, but it is also reminiscent of pointer to functions and functions with default parameters: you need create an adapter (a thunk) for the signature to match. –  Matthieu M. Mar 14 '11 at 20:00

I think, it is required to reproduce all template parameters, even default. Note, that Standard itself does not use template template parameters for containter adaptors, and prefers to use regular template parameters:

template < class T , class Container = deque <T > > class queue { ... };
template < class T , class Container = vector <T>, class Compare = less < typename Container :: value_type > > class priority_queue { ... };
share|improve this answer

You have to give the full template signature, including default parameters, if you want to be able to use the template template parameter the usual way.

template <typename T, template <class U, class V = allocator<U> > class C>
class ExampleTemplate {
    C<T> items;
public:
    ....
};

If you want to handle other containers that the one from the STL, you can delegate container construction to a helper.

// Other specialization failed. Instantiate a std::vector.
template <typename T, typename C>
struct make_container_
{
    typedef std::vector<T> result;
};

// STL containers
template <typename T, template <class U, class V = allocator<U> > class C>
struct make_container_<T,C>
{
    typedef C<T> result;
};

// Other specializations
...

template <typename T, typename C>
class ExampleTemplate {
    make_container_<T,C>::result items;
public:
    ....
};
share|improve this answer

The following code will allow you to do something like you're asking for. Of course, this won't work with standard containers, since this has to already be part of the template class that's being passed into the template.


/* Allows you to create template classes that allow users to specify only some
 * of the default parameters, and some not.
 *
 * Example:
 *  template <typename A = use_default, typename B = use_default>
 *  class foo
 *  {
 *              typedef use_default_param<A, int> a_type;
 *              typedef use_default_param<B, double> b_type;
 *              ...
 *  };
 *
 *  foo<use_default, bool> x;
 *  foo<char, use_default> y;
 */

struct use_default;

template<class param, class default_type>
struct default_param
{
        typedef param type;
};

template<class default_type>
struct default_param<use_default, default_type>
{
        typedef default_type type;
};

But I don't really think this is what you're looking for. What you're doing with the containers is unlikely to be applicable to arbitrary containers as many of them will have the problem you're having with multiple default parameters with non-obvious types as defaults.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.