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I generate all my columns in a subclassed DataGridView programmatically. However Visual Studio 2008 keeps reading my constructor class (which populates a DataTable with empty content and binds it to the DataGridView) and generates code for the columns in the InitializeComponent method - in the process setting AutoGenerateColumns to false.

This causes errors in design-time compilation which are only solved by manually going into the design code and deleting all references to these autogenerated columns.

How can I stop it doing this?

I have tried:

  • Making the control 'Frozen'
  • Setting the DataGridView instantiated object protected (suggested in a previous post which referred to this site)
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7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It sounds like you are adding controls in the constructor. Perhaps add the columns slightly later - perhaps something like overriding OnParentChanged; you'll then be able to check DesignMode so you only add the columns during execution (not during design).

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This worked for me, see answer –  Brendan Feb 10 '09 at 22:38

I've seen this behavior before for ComboBox's with the Items property and it's really frustrating. Here's how I've gotten around it with ComboBox. You should be able to apply this to the DataGridView.

I created a "new" property called Items and set it to not be browsable and to be explicitly be hidden from serialization. Under the hood it just accesses the real Items property.

[Browsable(false)]
[DesignerSerializationVisibility(DesignerSerializationVisibility.Hidden)]
public new ObjectCollection Items
{
    get { return ((ComboBox)this).Items; }
}

[Browsable(false)]
[DesignerSerializationVisibility(DesignerSerializationVisibility.Hidden)]
public new object DataSource
{
    get { return ((ComboBox)this).DataSource; }
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I see what you are trying however when I try to adapt this to a subclassed DataGridView it fails. Should there be 'override' in there? –  Brendan Feb 10 '09 at 20:07
    
You'll have to customize it for DataGridView's Columns. This is just a cut/paste from a ComboBox sample I have. Definately don't want to override as nothing here is virtual –  JaredPar Feb 10 '09 at 21:07
    
It's the first time I see the attribute 'DesignerSerializationVisibility'. Very nice feature... I will integrate it in a couple of my framework components. Thank you JaredPar. –  Samuel Jun 27 '12 at 18:44

I do this often in my custom controls, if you wrap the code you don't want to execute in the designer in a DesignMode check, it should fix your problems.

    if (!DesignMode)
    {
        // Your code here
    }
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I wrapped the code where I populate the DataTable and Bind it to the DataGridView in the above but unfortunately it did not work –  Brendan Feb 10 '09 at 20:18

Mark was right. The Designer looks at the constructor for this autogenerating behaviour. Here is how I got around it.

Took the code which constructs/binds the DataTable to the DataGridView out of the constructor and placed it in a method.

Using the Load event on the containing form - which holds multiple DataGridViews call the BindData() method on each instance,


List<Control> childControls = Misc.Misc.GetAllChildControls(this);
foreach (Control ctrl in childControls) {
    if (ctrl is WorksheetGridView) {
         WorksheetGridView wsgv = ctrl as WorksheetGridView;
         wsgv.BindData();
    }
}

where GetAllChildControls is a method in a helper class


internal static List<Control> GetAllChildControls(Control topControl)
{
    List<Control> ctrlStore = new List<Control>();
    ctrlStore.Add(topControl);
    if (topControl.HasChildren)
    {
        foreach (Control ctrl in topControl.Controls)
        {
            ctrlStore.AddRange(GetAllChildControls(ctrl));                }
        }
    }
    return ctrlStore;
}

Sorry if this is explicit but I never want to forget how to do this!

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careful with this, x64 applications in debugger swallow exceptions that are thrown from form_Load methods –  stackuser83 Oct 26 '13 at 0:10

I ran into a problem similar to this, and am posting my solution here since when I wrote my question this was the top suggested question. Each time I compiled my code the designer would add each of the columns in the datasource automatically (and the next time I built my code they'd appear in the running app) despite autogenerate columns being set to false.

Eventually I managed to stop it by giving one of my columns the same name that the auto-generated column had (my columns had originally been created manually before the datasource was available).

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JaredPar's suggestion worked for me:

public partial class RefusjonsOppgjorGrid : DataGridView
{
    public RefusjonsOppgjorGrid()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    [Browsable(false)]
    [DesignerSerializationVisibility(DesignerSerializationVisibility.Hidden)]
    public new DataGridViewColumnCollection Columns
    {
        get{ return base.Columns;}
    }
}
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This is an old questions now but it is still a problem in 2014 with VS2013.

I had a DataGridView with its DataSource set to a BindingSource which in turn had another BindingSource as its DataSource. To solve my issue I didn't need to change anything else other than moving the DataGridView.DataSource assignment into an OnControlCreate override on the form.

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