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I have a scenario where I have multiple threads adding to a queue and multiple threads reading from the same queue. If the queue reaches a specific size all threads that are filling the queue will be blocked on add until an item is removed from the queue.

The solution below is what I am using right now and my question is: How can this be improved? Is there an object that already enables this behavior in the BCL that I should be using?

internal class BlockingCollection<T> : CollectionBase, IEnumerable
{
    //todo: might be worth changing this into a proper QUEUE

    private AutoResetEvent _FullEvent = new AutoResetEvent(false);

    internal T this[int i]
    {
        get { return (T) List[i]; }
    }

    private int _MaxSize;
    internal int MaxSize
    {
        get { return _MaxSize; }
        set
        {
            _MaxSize = value;
            checkSize();
        }
    }

    internal BlockingCollection(int maxSize)
    {
        MaxSize = maxSize;
    }

    internal void Add(T item)
    {
        Trace.WriteLine(string.Format("BlockingCollection add waiting: {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId));

        _FullEvent.WaitOne();

        List.Add(item);

        Trace.WriteLine(string.Format("BlockingCollection item added: {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId));

        checkSize();
    }

    internal void Remove(T item)
    {
        lock (List)
        {
            List.Remove(item);
        }

        Trace.WriteLine(string.Format("BlockingCollection item removed: {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId));
    }

    protected override void OnRemoveComplete(int index, object value)
    {
        checkSize();
        base.OnRemoveComplete(index, value);
    }

    internal new IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
    {
        return List.GetEnumerator();
    }

    private void checkSize()
    {
        if (Count < MaxSize)
        {
            Trace.WriteLine(string.Format("BlockingCollection FullEvent set: {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId));
            _FullEvent.Set();
        }
        else
        {
            Trace.WriteLine(string.Format("BlockingCollection FullEvent reset: {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId));
            _FullEvent.Reset();
        }
    }
}
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.Net how has built-in classes to help with this scenario. Most of the answers listed here are obsolete. See the most recent answers at the bottom. Look into thread-safe blocking collections. The answers may be obsolete, but it's still a good question! –  Tom A Mar 14 '13 at 0:29
    
I think it's still a good idea to learn about Monitor.Wait/Pulse/PulseAll even if we have new concurrent classes in .NET. –  thewpfguy May 14 at 16:21
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9 Answers

up vote 128 down vote accepted

That looks very unsafe (very little synchronization); how about something like:

class SizeQueue<T>
{
    private readonly Queue<T> queue = new Queue<T>();
    private readonly int maxSize;
    public SizeQueue(int maxSize) { this.maxSize = maxSize; }

    public void Enqueue(T item)
    {
        lock (queue)
        {
            while (queue.Count >= maxSize)
            {
                Monitor.Wait(queue);
            }
            queue.Enqueue(item);
            if (queue.Count == 1)
            {
                // wake up any blocked dequeue
                Monitor.PulseAll(queue);
            }
        }
    }
    public T Dequeue()
    {
        lock (queue)
        {
            while (queue.Count == 0)
            {
                Monitor.Wait(queue);
            }
            T item = queue.Dequeue();
            if (queue.Count == maxSize - 1)
            {
                // wake up any blocked enqueue
                Monitor.PulseAll(queue);
            }
            return item;
        }
    }
}

(edit)

In reality, you'd want a way to close the queue so that readers start exiting cleanly - perhaps something like a bool flag - if set, an empty queue just returns (rather than blocking):

bool closing;
public void Close()
{
    lock(queue)
    {
        closing = true;
        Monitor.PulseAll(queue);
    }
}
public bool TryDequeue(out T value)
{
    lock (queue)
    {
        while (queue.Count == 0)
        {
            if (closing)
            {
                value = default(T);
                return false;
            }
            Monitor.Wait(queue);
        }
        value = queue.Dequeue();
        if (queue.Count == maxSize - 1)
        {
            // wake up any blocked enqueue
            Monitor.PulseAll(queue);
        }
        return true;
    }
}
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1  
See also edit... –  Marc Gravell Feb 9 '09 at 23:07
1  
@Marc- an optimisation, if you were expecting the queue to always reach capacity, would be to pass the maxSize value into the constructor of the Queue<T>. You could add another constructor to your class to accomodate for that. –  RichardOD Jan 22 '10 at 16:26
2  
Why SizeQueue, why not FixedSizeQueue? –  mindless.panda Mar 15 '10 at 20:26
9  
@user260197 - because naming stuff is tricky ;-p Feel free to rename it.. –  Marc Gravell Mar 16 '10 at 17:57
3  
@Lasse - it releases the lock(s) during Wait, so other threads can acquire it. It reclaims the lock(s) when it wakes up. –  Marc Gravell May 7 '10 at 18:43
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Use .net 4 BlockingCollection, to enqueue use Add(), to dequeue use Take(). It internally uses non-blocking ConcurrentQueue. More info here Fast and Best Producer/consumer queue technique BlockingCollection vs concurrent Queue

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"How can this be improved?"

Well, you need to look at every method in your class and consider what would happen if another thread was simultaneously calling that method or any other method. For example, you put a lock in the Remove method, but not in the Add method. What happens if one thread Adds at the same time as another thread Removes? Bad things.

Also consider that a method can return a second object that provides access to the first object's internal data - for example, GetEnumerator. Imagine one thread is going through that enumerator, another thread is modifying the list at the same time. Not good.

A good rule of thumb is to make this simpler to get right by cutting down the number of methods in the class to the absolute minimum.

In particular, don't inherit another container class, because you will expose all of that class's methods, providing a way for the caller to corrupt the internal data, or to see partially complete changes to the data (just as bad, because the data appears corrupted at that moment). Hide all the details and be completely ruthless about how you allow access to them.

I'd strongly advise you to use off-the-shelf solutions - get a book about threading or use 3rd party library. Otherwise, given what you're attempting, you're going to be debugging your code for a long time.

Also, wouldn't it make more sense for Remove to return an item (say, the one that was added first, as it's a queue), rather than the caller choosing a specific item? And when the queue is empty, perhaps Remove should also block.

Update: Marc's answer actually implements all these suggestions! :) But I'll leave this here as it may be helpful to understand why his version is such an improvement.

share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate the detailed explanations. Thanks! –  spoon16 Feb 9 '09 at 23:04
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This is what I came op for a thread safe bounded blocking queue.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;

public class BlockingBuffer<T>
{
    private Object t_lock;
    private Semaphore sema_NotEmpty;
    private Semaphore sema_NotFull;
    private T[] buf;

    private int getFromIndex;
    private int putToIndex;
    private int size;
    private int numItems;

    public BlockingBuffer(int Capacity)
    {
        if (Capacity <= 0)
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("Capacity must be larger than 0");

        t_lock = new Object();
        buf = new T[Capacity];
        sema_NotEmpty = new Semaphore(0, Capacity);
        sema_NotFull = new Semaphore(Capacity, Capacity);
        getFromIndex = 0;
        putToIndex = 0;
        size = Capacity;
        numItems = 0;
    }

    public void put(T item)
    {
        sema_NotFull.WaitOne();
        lock (t_lock)
        {
            while (numItems == size)
            {
                Monitor.Pulse(t_lock);
                Monitor.Wait(t_lock);
            }

            buf[putToIndex++] = item;

            if (putToIndex == size)
                putToIndex = 0;

            numItems++;

            Monitor.Pulse(t_lock);

        }
        sema_NotEmpty.Release();


    }

    public T take()
    {
        T item;

        sema_NotEmpty.WaitOne();
        lock (t_lock)
        {

            while (numItems == 0)
            {
                Monitor.Pulse(t_lock);
                Monitor.Wait(t_lock);
            }

            item = buf[getFromIndex++];

            if (getFromIndex == size)
                getFromIndex = 0;

            numItems--;

            Monitor.Pulse(t_lock);

        }
        sema_NotFull.Release();

        return item;
    }
}
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Could you provide some code samples of how I'd queue up some thread functions using this library, including how I'd instantiate this class? –  theJerm Nov 10 '13 at 19:39
    
This question/response is a bit dated. You should look at the System.Collections.Concurrent namespace for blocking queue support. –  Kevin Nov 16 '13 at 18:35
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I just knocked this up using the Reactive Extensions and remembered this question:

public class BlockingQueue<T>
{
    private readonly Subject<T> _queue;
    private readonly IEnumerator<T> _enumerator;
    private readonly object _sync = new object();

    public BlockingQueue()
    {
        _queue = new Subject<T>();
        _enumerator = _queue.GetEnumerator();
    }

    public void Enqueue(T item)
    {
        lock (_sync)
        {
            _queue.OnNext(item);
        }
    }

    public T Dequeue()
    {
        _enumerator.MoveNext();
        return _enumerator.Current;
    }
}

Not necessarily entirely safe, but very simple.

share|improve this answer
    
What is Subject<t>? I don't have any resolver for its namespace. –  theJerm Nov 10 '13 at 19:35
    
It's part of the Reactive Extensions. –  Mark Rendle Nov 19 '13 at 18:38
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You can use the BlockingCollection and ConcurrentQueue in the System.Collections.Concurrent Namespace

 public class ProducerConsumerQueue<T> : BlockingCollection<T>
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the ProducerConsumerQueue, Use Add and TryAdd for Enqueue and TryEnqueue and Take and TryTake for Dequeue and TryDequeue functionality
    /// </summary>
    public ProducerConsumerQueue()  
        : base(new ConcurrentQueue<T>())
    {
    }

  /// <summary>
  /// Initializes a new instance of the ProducerConsumerQueue, Use Add and TryAdd for Enqueue and TryEnqueue and Take and TryTake for Dequeue and TryDequeue functionality
  /// </summary>
  /// <param name="maxSize"></param>
    public ProducerConsumerQueue(int maxSize)
        : base(new ConcurrentQueue<T>(), maxSize)
    {
    }



}
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1  
BlockingCollection defaults to Queue. So, I don't think this is necessary. –  Curtis White Sep 18 '13 at 13:59
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I haven't fully explored the TPL but they might have something that fits your needs, or at the very least, some Reflector fodder to snag some inspiration from.

Hope that helps.

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Thanks for the link, I'll take a closer look at the TPL. –  spoon16 Feb 9 '09 at 23:21
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If you want maximum throughput, allowing multiple readers to read and only one writer to write, BCL has something called ReaderWriterLockSlim that should help slim down your code...

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I want none to be able to write if the queue is full though. –  spoon16 Feb 9 '09 at 22:05
    
So you combine it with a lock. Here are some very good examples albahari.com/threading/part2.aspx#_ProducerConsumerQWaitHandle albahari.com/threading/part4.aspx –  DavidN Feb 9 '09 at 22:10
2  
With queue/dequeue, everyone is a writer... an exclusive lock will perhaps be more pragmatic –  Marc Gravell Feb 9 '09 at 22:25
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Well, you might look at System.Threading.Semaphore class. Other than that - no, you have to make this yourself. AFAIK there is no such built-in collection.

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I looked at that for throttling the number of threads that are accessing a resource but it doesn't allow you to block all access to a resource based on some condition (like Collection.Count). AFAIK anyway –  spoon16 Feb 9 '09 at 22:07
    
Well, you do that part yoursef, just like you do now. Simply instead of MaxSize and _FullEvent you have the Semaphore, which you initialize with the right count in the constructor. Then, upon every Add/Remove you call WaitForOne() or Release(). –  Vilx- Feb 9 '09 at 22:09
    
It's not much different than what you have now. Just more simple IMHO. –  Vilx- Feb 9 '09 at 22:09
    
Can you give me an example showing this working? I didn't see how to adjust the size of a Semaphor dynamically which this scenario requires. Since you have to be able to block all resources only if the queue is full. –  spoon16 Feb 9 '09 at 22:22
    
Ahh, changing size! Why didn't you say so immediately? OK, then a semaphore is not for you. Good luck with this approach! –  Vilx- Feb 9 '09 at 22:40
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