Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to do a conditional in PHP for the different versions of Internet Explorer along the lines of:

if($browser == ie6){ //do this} elseif($browser == ie7) { //dothis } elseif...

I have seen many variations on similar code, but looking for something super simple that is very easy to code to do some simple if and else and do different things.

Thanks

EDIT: I need this to show some different messages to users so CSS conditionals etc are no good.

share|improve this question
2  
Are you looking to serve differing CSS? In that case, consider conditional comments. Less hassle –  Pekka 웃 Mar 14 '11 at 17:49
    
Apparently IE10 doesn't support conditional statements. –  CharlieM Apr 22 '13 at 15:47

14 Answers 14

Notice the case in 'Trident':

if (isset($_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT']) &&
    ((strpos($_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'], 'MSIE') !== false) || strpos($_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'], 'Trident') !== false)) {   
     // IE is here :-(
    }
share|improve this answer

Checking for MSIE only is not enough to detect IE. You need also "Trident" which is only used in IE11. So here is my solution which worked an versions 8 to 11.

$agent=strtoupper($_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT']);
$isIE=(strpos($agent,'MSIE')!==false || strpos($agent,'TRIDENT')!==false);
share|improve this answer
    
Please see question title. –  Jamie Barker Mar 23 at 9:44

A version that will continue to work with both IE10 and IE11:

preg_match('/MSIE (.*?);/', $_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'], $matches);
if(count($matches)<2){
  preg_match('/Trident\/\d{1,2}.\d{1,2}; rv:([0-9]*)/', $_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'], $matches);
}

if (count($matches)>1){
  //Then we're using IE
  $version = $matches[1];

  switch(true){
    case ($version<=8):
      //IE 8 or under!
      break;

    case ($version==9 || $version==10):
      //IE9 & IE10!
      break;

    case ($version==11):
      //Version 11!
      break;

    default:
      //You get the idea
  }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I am not sure why you used a switch statement when it seems like an if/then would be more appropriate, but this worked great. And apparently you were the only one who read that the OP wanted separate version support. –  Jake May 9 '13 at 20:42
    
we actually had to target IE including 11 and this worked beautifully –  sean9999 May 28 '14 at 15:21

A tridend based approach would be better. Here is a quick function for checking IE 8.

<?php
function is_IE8(){
   if(strpos(str_replace(' ', '', $_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT']),'Trident/4.0')!== FALSE){
       return TRUE;
   };
   return FALSE; 
} 
?>
share|improve this answer

Here's a little php function I wrote that uses the regex directly from MSFT's suggested javascript sniffing code from this article: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms537509(v=vs.85).aspx

/**
* Returns the version of Internet Explorer or false
*/
function isIE(){

    $isIE = preg_match("/MSIE ([0-9]{1,}[\.0-9]{0,})/",$_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'],$version);
    if($isIE){
        return $version[1];
    }
    return $isIE;

}
share|improve this answer

You could use something like this for different messages or div/css

<!--[if IE 6]>
<style type="text/css">
div.ie6 { display:block; }
</style>
<![endif]-->

<!--[if IE 7]>
<style type="text/css">
div.ie7 { display:block; }
</style>
<![endif]-->

<!--[if IE 8]>
<style type="text/css">
div.ie8 { display:block; }
</style>
<![endif]-->

<!--[if IE 9]>
message1
<![endif]-->

<!--[if !IE 6]>
message2
<![endif]-->

<!--[if lt IE 8]>
message3
<![endif]-->

OR use different div of css

<!--[if lte IE 8]>
<style type="text/css">
div.lteie8 { display:block; }
</style>
<![endif]-->

<!--[if gt IE 6]>
<style type="text/css">
div.gtie6 { display:block; }
</style>
<![endif]-->

<!--[if gte IE 6]>
<style type="text/css">
div.gteie6 { display:block; }
</style>
<![endif]-->
share|improve this answer
    
Note for posterity: these conditionals do not work in IE10+. –  Mike Kormendy Nov 6 '14 at 0:45

I do this

$u = $_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'];

$isIE7  = (bool)preg_match('/msie 7./i', $u );
$isIE8  = (bool)preg_match('/msie 8./i', $u );
$isIE9  = (bool)preg_match('/msie 9./i', $u );
$isIE10 = (bool)preg_match('/msie 10./i', $u );

if ($isIE9) {
    //do ie9 stuff
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like this version, and have modified it to include for IE11 on Windows 8.1. –  Mike Kormendy Nov 6 '14 at 3:21
up vote 102 down vote accepted

This is what I ended up using a variation of:

if(preg_match('/(?i)msie [1-8]/',$_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT']))
{
    // if IE<=8
    include ( TEMPLATEPATH . '/noie.php' );
    exit;
}
else
{
    // if IE>8
}
share|improve this answer
62  
This pattern will recognize Internet Explorer 10 as Internet Explorer 1. –  chaos Jul 20 '12 at 23:49
2  
I think some versions of Opera will match this, but they can be filtered out by checking for 'Opera'. –  Liam Sep 6 '12 at 11:32
34  
just change it to '/(?i)msie [2-8]/'. Do you really need to check for ie 1? It was released in 1995 and was replaced by ie2 a few months later. –  Landon May 10 '13 at 16:07
6  
I changed it to [4-8]. IE updates are getting more and more frequent and I really want to make sure I don't have to make a similar change during the lifetime of the web app I'm working on (as it only has a lifespan of 3 years). If someone is browsing the web with IE 5 or less, they have WAY more problems than viewing my web app. –  Adam Erstelle Nov 22 '13 at 1:35
1  
If you just add a period it will check for the lower number versions without checking for version 10, 20, etc. '/(?i)msie [1-8]\./' –  michaellindahl Feb 11 '14 at 20:04

PHP has a function called get_browser() that will return an object (or array if you so choose) with details about the users' browser and what it can do.

A simple look through gave me this code:

$browser = get_browser( null, true );
if( $browser['name'] == "Firefox" )
    if( $browser['majorversion'] == 4 )
        echo "You're using Firefox version 4!";

This is not a surefire way (as it reads from HTTP_USER_AGENT, which can be spoofed, and will sometimes be analyzed wrong by php), but it's the easiest one that you can find as far as I know.

share|improve this answer
2  
requires server side configurations to work. I am not sure how reliable it is for products to run on different servers –  latvian Jan 23 '14 at 1:13

Here is a great resource for detecting browsers in php: http://php.net/manual/en/function.get-browser.php

Here is one of the examples that seems the simplest:

<?php
function get_user_browser()
{
    $u_agent = $_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'];
    $ub = '';
    if(preg_match('/MSIE/i',$u_agent))
    {
        $ub = "ie";
    }
    elseif(preg_match('/Firefox/i',$u_agent))
    {
        $ub = "firefox";
    }
    elseif(preg_match('/Safari/i',$u_agent))
    {
        $ub = "safari";
    }
    elseif(preg_match('/Chrome/i',$u_agent))
    {
        $ub = "chrome";
    }
    elseif(preg_match('/Flock/i',$u_agent))
    {
        $ub = "flock";
    }
    elseif(preg_match('/Opera/i',$u_agent))
    {
        $ub = "opera";
    }

    return $ub;
}
?>

Then later in your code you could say something like

$browser = get_user_browser();
if($browser == "ie"){
    //do stuff
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is there any reason to set $ub, and then return it at the end. Surely it's more efficient (skips out some unnecessary if's) to return the name of the browser instead of setting the variable. –  handuel Mar 13 '13 at 20:28
    
Some simple, stock browser testing, but it doesn't do versions like the request... –  Jake May 9 '13 at 20:42

You can as well look into PHP's get_browser(); http://php.net/manual/en/function.get-browser.php

Maybe you'll find it useful for more features.

share|improve this answer
2  
Neat. But it requires a setting in your php.ini which could be a problem for some users. –  Jake May 9 '13 at 19:56

'HTTP_USER_AGENT' Contents of the User-Agent: header from the current request, if there is one. This is a string denoting the user agent being which is accessing the page. A typical example is: Mozilla/4.5 [en] (X11; U; Linux 2.2.9 i586). Among other things, you can use this value with get_browser() to tailor your page's output to the capabilities of the user agent.

So I assume you'll be able to get the browser name/id from the $_SERVER["HTTP_USER_AGENT"] variable.

share|improve this answer

You can check the HTTP_USER_AGENT server variable. The user agent transfered by IE contains MSIE

if(strpos($_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'], 'MSIE') !== false) { ... }

For specific versions you can extend your condition

if(strpos($_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'], 'MSIE 6.') !== false) { ... }

Also see this related question.

share|improve this answer
1  
doesnt work for IE11 –  dixus Aug 14 '14 at 13:14
    
It is not work for 10. –  Jek-fdrv Nov 23 '14 at 11:05
    
@dixus for IE11 you have to do this preg_match('/Trident\/7.0; rv:11.0/', $_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT']) –  andufo Dec 9 '14 at 22:05

You can do this via parsing the user-agent header:

http://php.about.com/od/learnphp/p/http_user_agent.htm

Be wary that this is not very reliable and can be trivially spoofed.

share|improve this answer
    
Just remember that the User Agent can be faked. –  drudge Mar 14 '11 at 17:52
3  
If the user wants to spoof their User-Agent, they want to retrieve the contents of the page as if that was really their user-agent. The result is what they asked for. No problem here. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 14 '11 at 17:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.