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I want to place a <div> in the middle of an element. Aligning it horizontally is easy, and of course the vertical alignment can be done with JS, but I'm sure that there's a better way of doing this with CSS. What's the trick?

P.S. I need this for an application with the HTML5 <canvas> element, so I don't mind if the solution only works in browsers that support canvas and in IE 7,8 (which support canvas when using a plugin).


edit: the height (and width) of the div are resizable in browsers that support the CSS3 property resize. However, I don't mind about it too much.

another edit: I also don't know the height of the div (even if it hasn't been resized).


edit: see live demo here

this example uses JS. (Loktar - thanks for the link).


Thanks();

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Is the div you want to align vertically fixed height? –  thirtydot Mar 14 '11 at 17:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can also use display:table, display:table-cell, and vertical-align:center like here to center. It will adjust to fit content, but unfortunately the width will remain 100% of the container. You can see it used here

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1  
With a small change to your idea - I did it ! It probably doesn't work in IE7, but that's pretty insignificant. –  string QNA Mar 16 '11 at 13:02

Live Demo

One way to align vertically is to set the line-height to the height of the container.

#parent{
   width: 200px;
   height: 300px;
   line-height: 300px; 
   text-align:center;
}
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You set it to height, not height/2 –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 14 '11 at 17:59
    
oops... thanks for catching that. –  Loktar Mar 14 '11 at 18:02
    
np. :) Nice solution btw, will have to remember this. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 14 '11 at 18:10

If the element you want to align has a fixed size, give it absolute position and make its top and left 50%. Then subtract half its height for its margin-top and half its width for margin-left. e.g.

html:

<div id="container">
    <div id="alignedcontainer">content</div>
</div>

css:

#container {
    position: relative;
}
#alignedcontainer {
    position: absolute;
    width: 500px;
    height: 400px;
    top: 50%;
    left: 50%;
    margin-top: -200px;
    margin-left: -250px;
}
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If the element does not need to wrap, a quick and dirty way is to set the line height equal to the div height (assuming it's a static height).

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This works in Chrome

<html>
<head>
    <style>
        #outer 
        {
            position: relative;
            border: 1px solid #000; 
            width: 400px; 
            height: 400px; 
            margin: 20px; 
            padding: 20px;                 
            }
        #inner 
        {
            position:absolute; 
            top:25%; 
            right:25%; 
            bottom:25%; 
            left:25%;
            width: 200px; 
            height: 200px; 
            background-color: #ccc;                
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
<div id="outer">
    <div id="inner"></div>
</div>
</body>

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