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I have four integers {a, b, c, d} that can have the following range of values:

a - {0 or 1} (1 bit)

b - {0 or 1} (1 bit)

c - {0, 1, 2, ..., 7} (3 bits)

d - {0, 1, 2, ..., 7} (3 bits)

at first, I would like to pack them into a one byte that can be then written to a binary file. later, I would like to unpack that one byte and get from it to a tuple of the form (a, b, c, d).

I know how to read/write a byte to a binary file in python. But how do I do the bits packing/unpacking?

Thanks.

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If you need to do this a lot, check out construct.wikispaces.com and bitbucket.org/haypo/hachoir/wiki/Home which both pack and unpack according to a declarative format definition. –  Beni Cherniavsky-Paskin Mar 14 '11 at 18:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Use shift and bitwise OR, then convert to a character to get a "byte":

x = chr(a | (b << 1) | (c << 2) | (d << 5))

To unpack this byte again, first convert to an integer, then shift and use bitwise AND:

i = ord(x)
a = i & 1
b = (i >> 1) & 1
c = (i >> 2) & 7
d = (i >> 5) & 7

Explanation: Initially, you have

0000000a
0000000b
00000ccc
00000ddd

The left-shifts give you

0000000a
000000b0
000ccc00
ddd00000

The bitwise OR results in

dddcccba

Converting to a character will convert this to a single byte.

Unpacking: The four different right-shifts result in

dddcccba
0dddcccb
00dddccc
00000ddd

Masking (bitwise AND) with 1 (0b00000001) or 7 (0b00000111) results in

0000000a
0000000b
00000ccc
00000ddd

again.

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2  
Note that strings are only strings of bytes in Python 2; in Python 3 they're Unicode, so chr(x) will actually give you a 2- or 4-byte word. You'll want to construct an actual bytes object instead of a string. I'm not sure off-hand what the bytes equivalent of chr is, if there is one. –  Glenn Maynard Mar 14 '11 at 18:13
2  
(I think the correct thing to do is generally as sjr does: simply return it as an int, and handle changing it to a single byte at the point you actually use it.) –  Glenn Maynard Mar 14 '11 at 18:14
1  
I also favour ANDing before you do the bit shift in constructing the byte to ensure that the the data is of the expected width. Other wise you can get all sorts of nasty and subtle errors. –  Peter M Mar 14 '11 at 19:48
1  
@Glenn: regarding your first comment: Very good point. It would probably be best to use bytearray.append() for the conversion from integer to byte and and item access on a bytearray for the conversion back. This would work in Python 2.6 or newer. –  Sven Marnach Mar 14 '11 at 22:01
    
@Peter: You may as well just assert your requirements, eg. assert 0 <= a <= 1, a; if that's what you expect to receive, then it's better to throw an error if you get invalid data instead of silently returning something bogus. –  Glenn Maynard Mar 15 '11 at 2:44

Pretty simple. Mask (for range), shift them into place, and or them together.

packed = ((a & 1) << 7) | ((b & 1) << 6) | ((c & 7) << 3) | (d & 7)

a = (packed >> 7) & 1
b = (packed >> 6) & 1
c = (packed >> 3) & 7
d = packed & 7
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def encode(a, b, c, d):
  return a | b << 1 | c << 2 | d << 5

def decode(x):
  return x & 1, (x >> 1) & 1, (x >> 2) & 7, (x >> 5) & 7
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Note that the parentheses around multiple return values are typically omitted in Python: return x & 1, (x >> 1) & 1, (x >> 2) & 7, (x >> 5) & 7). –  Glenn Maynard Mar 14 '11 at 18:08
    
Note that you have a hanging closing paranthesis. ;-) –  Santa Mar 14 '11 at 18:29

If you need to this kind of thing a lot then bit shifting can become tedious and error prone. There are third-party libraries that can help - I wrote one called bitstring:

To pack and convert to a byte:

x = bitstring.pack('2*uint:1, 2*uint:3', a, b, c, d).bytes

and to unpack:

a, b, c, d = bitstring.BitArray(bytes=x).unpack('2*uint:1, 2*uint:3')

This is probably overkill for your example, but it's helpful when things get more complicated.

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