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I'm trying to filter a VARCHAR column where the first letter is NOT an alpha.

Ex.
values = ['.net', '30 days', 'apple', 'beta']

returns ['.net', '30 days']

Note: for reference this is to group the names into filter buckets by first letter, where anything not an alpha character is grouped into '#' (think iPhone Contacts Browse grouping).

Filtering on a single alpha is easy with LIKE or substring, but I can't find a simple way to filter for ALL non-alpha characters.

EDIT: It is case-sensitive, but I'm expecting all lower-case, all the time.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Is the solution as easy as:

SELECT * 
FROM SomeTable 
WHERE SomeColumn NOT LIKE '[A-z]%'

?

EDIT: Changed [A-Z] to [A-z] just in case you're using a case-sensitive collation.

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+1 Nice one. Works on sql server. But is it compatible across all databases? –  Byron Whitlock Mar 14 '11 at 18:36
1  
I'm pretty sure the LIKE operator is supported by more than just T-SQL. I don't have enough experience with other systems to give you a definitive list, but I suggest trying it and reporting back. –  John Bledsoe Mar 14 '11 at 18:47
1  
LIKE is portable. The range syntax isn't AFAIK. BTW it is best to use '[A-z]%' so it works correctly on case sensitive collations for strings like zebra –  Martin Smith Mar 14 '11 at 21:00
    
Are we allowed to answer our own questions? A colleague suggested an alternate query for this case: SELECT * FROM SomeTable WHERE SomeColumn < 'a' –  mviamari Mar 16 '11 at 5:21
    
@miguardo Bad idea IMHO. Check the table of ASCII codes and you'll see that some non-alphas are after 'z', and there are more non-alphas between 'Z' and 'a'. –  John Bledsoe Mar 16 '11 at 12:49
select * from table
where ASCII(Name) NOT BETWEEN 65/* A */ and 90/* Z */
 AND ASCII(Name) NOT BETWEEN 97 /* a */ AND 122 /* z */

You didn't specify flavor so this is TSQL though I believe ASCII is supported in most SQL implementations. The inline comment characters (/* */) may differ.

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+1 compatibility is exactly my thought. –  Byron Whitlock Mar 14 '11 at 18:37
    
Won't use an index at all. LIKE is in the SQL standard and may use an index at least. ASCII isn't mentioned in ANSI SQL 92 –  gbn Mar 14 '11 at 18:53

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