Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have 2 bool flags and need to filter my collection accordingly. There has to be an cleaner way to do this. If anyone can point me in the right direction I'd appreciate it. Thanks.

var _filteredEvents = from ev in _events 
                      select ev;
if (!queueEmail) // don't queue email
{
    if (!queueTextMessaging) // don't queue textmessaging
    {
        _filteredEvents = from ev in _events
                              where ev.QueueTypeEnumText != QueueType.TextMessage.ToString() 
                                && ev.QueueTypeEnumText !=QueueType.Email.ToString()
                              select ev;
    }
    else
    {
         _filteredEvents = from ev in _events
                              where ev.QueueTypeEnumText != QueueType.Email.ToString()
                              select ev;
    }
}
else //queue email
{
    if (!queueTextMessaging) //don't queue textmessaging
    {
        _filteredEvents = from ev in _events
                          where ev.QueueTypeEnumText != QueueType.TextMessage.ToString()
                          select ev;
    }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Since LINQ uses deferred execution, you can just change the Where() extensions onto your object, and reassign it as you go:

var _filteredEvents = _events; 
if (!queueEmail)
     _filteredEvents =  _filteredEvents.Where(ev => ev.QueueTypeEnumText != QueueType.Email.ToString());
if (!queueTextMessaging)
     _filteredEvents =  _filteredEvents.Where(ev => ev.QueueTypeEnumText != QueueType.TextMessage.ToString());
share|improve this answer
    
Can someone elaborate on this a little bit? I am interested. How exactly is this working. Maybe I don't fully understand deferred execution. A brief explanation would be splendid. Maybe just walk me through each line and explain what's happening. Is the second IF adding a .Where() to the .Where() that is already there from the first IF? I was under the impression you couldn't assign a generic var after it had been initialized. – Chev Mar 14 '11 at 18:40
    
This is awesome, thanks! I did get an error because I was using a strongly typed collection so I updated line 1 to "_events.AsEnumerable()" and it went away. Error was "Cannot implicitly convert type. 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable..." – mokumaxCraig Mar 14 '11 at 18:47
1  
@Chevex: You can reassign to a "var" - but you can't change it's type. If the original var is IEnumerable<T>, then you can assign "over it" as much as you'd like. By calling _filteredEvents.Where(), we return a new IEnumerable<T>, and just replace the reference in _filteredEvents. This can be done as many times as you want, since the execution of the "query" doesn't actually occur until you enumerate the collection. This means, when we finally do the enumeration (after the above code), all of the where clauses will get executed as well as the original "select" if its required. – Reed Copsey Mar 14 '11 at 18:50
    
Got it. Thank you for the crystal clear explanation. – Chev Mar 14 '11 at 18:52

You can make one where clause:

where 
     (queueTextMessaging || ev.QueueTypeEnumText != QueueType.TextMessage.ToString())
   &&(queueEmail || ev.QueueTypeEnumText !=QueueType.Email.ToString())
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Mark! You and Jon had the same idea. Both were useful to me. – mokumaxCraig Mar 14 '11 at 18:51
var _filteredEvents =
  from ev in _events where (
    queueTextMessaging || ev.QueueTypeEnumText != QueueType.TextMessage.ToString() &&
    queueEmail || ev.QueueTypeEnumText !=QueueType.Email.ToString())
  select ev;
share|improve this answer
    
I really like this solution as well. Thanks Jon! – mokumaxCraig Mar 14 '11 at 18:50

I would simply create a Method testing the condition for you

var _filteredEvents = from ev in _events where Test(queueEmail, queueTextMessaging, ev) select ev;

...

bool Test(bool foo, bool bar, Event ev) {...}

share|improve this answer
3  
That won't work if it's using something like LINQ to SQL. – Jon Skeet Mar 14 '11 at 18:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.