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I've written a class for processing strings and I have the following problem: the string passed in can come with spaces at the beginning and at the end of the string.

I need to trim the spaces from the strings and convert them to lower case letters. My code so far:

var searchStr = wordToSearchReplacemntsFor.ToLower();
        searchStr = searchStr.Trim();

I couldn't find any function to help me in StringBuilder. The problem is that this class is supposed to process a lot of strings as quickly as possible. So I don't want to be creating 2 new strings for each string the class processes.

If this isn't possible, I'll go deeper into the processing algorithm.

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2  
Probably Trim then Lower will make it a little bit faster ;-) –  Snowbear Mar 14 '11 at 19:12
    
@David Don't be hatin' :) –  Kon Mar 14 '11 at 19:29
    
@Kon I'm not hatin', but there's a horses for courses argument here. .net solves some problems well and others not so well. –  David Heffernan Mar 14 '11 at 19:32
    
I know, and I pretty much agree with your original question. I was just joking. –  Kon Mar 14 '11 at 19:33
    
If you truly need every ms... Read this: dotnetperls.com/tolower he says to use ToLower(referenceToACulture) instead of ToLower() –  xanatos Mar 14 '11 at 19:40

5 Answers 5

Cyberdrew has the right idea. With string being immutable, you'll be allocating memory during both of those calls regardless. One thing I'd like to suggest, if you're going to call string.Trim().ToLower() in many locations in your code, is to simplify your calls with extension methods. For example:

public static class MyExtensions
{
    public static string TrimAndLower(this String str)
    {
        return str.Trim().ToLower();
    }
}   
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Why int instead of string? –  Cyberdrew Mar 14 '11 at 19:20
    
Oops... copy/paste fail. :) –  Kon Mar 14 '11 at 19:23
    
LOL That's what I figured ;) –  Cyberdrew Mar 14 '11 at 19:23
1  
Yep, thanks for the heads-up. Btw, I also realized that a simple (non-extension) method would work just as well. But I fancy extension methods. :) –  Kon Mar 14 '11 at 19:28

Try method chaining.

Ex:

var s = " YoUr StRiNg".Trim().ToLower();
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2  
getting rid of one extra-variable should not help lot. We're still talking about creating 2 string instances here. –  Snowbear Mar 14 '11 at 19:13
    
It is just meant to be a starting point. I don't think ghet realizes that you can chain methods. –  Cyberdrew Mar 14 '11 at 19:14
    
wouldn't that also create 2 strings? " YoUr StRiNg".Trim() will return a string then ToLower(); creates another one. It's the same. –  ghet Mar 14 '11 at 19:14
1  
This is the only way of doing it, there's not secret faster way..and doing it yourself with a char array will be slower than the native methods of the CLR. ToLower() and Trim will be marginally faster though, but not ToLowerInvariant afaik –  Chris S Mar 14 '11 at 19:15

If the strings use only ASCII characters, you can look at the C# ToLower Optimization. You could also try a lookup table if you know the character set ahead of time

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One thing about this implementation is that it will only handle characters between A - Z. Characters above 127 such as Ö would not get converted to ö. Whereas the .NET String.ToLower would handle such cases. That may or may not be important to the person posing the question. –  selbie Mar 15 '11 at 4:27

Here's my attempt. But before I would check this in, I would ask two very important questions.

  1. Are sequential "String.Trim" and "String.ToLower" calls really impacting the performance of my app? Would anyone notice if this algorithm was twice as slow or twice as fast? The only way to know is to measure the performance of my code and compare against pre-set performance goals. Otherwise, micro-optimizations will generate micro-performance gains.

  2. Just because I wrote an implementation that appears faster, doesn't mean that it really is. The compiler and run-time may have optimizations around common operations that I don't know about. I should compare the running time of my code to what already exists.

    static public string TrimAndLower(string str)
    {
    
        if (str == null)
        {
            return null;
        }
    
        int i = 0;
        int j = str.Length - 1;
        StringBuilder sb;
    
        while (i < str.Length)
        {
            if (Char.IsWhiteSpace(str[i])) // or say "if (str[i] == ' ')" if you only care about spaces
            {
                i++;
            }
            else
            {
                break;
            }
        }
    
        while (j > i)
        {
            if (Char.IsWhiteSpace(str[j])) // or say "if (str[j] == ' ')" if you only care about spaces
            {
                j--;
            }
            else
            {
                break;
            }
        }
    
        if (i > j)
        {
            return "";
        }
    
        sb = new StringBuilder(j - i + 1);
    
        while (i <= j)
        {
            // I was originally check for IsUpper before calling ToLower, probably not needed
            sb.Append(Char.ToLower(str[i]));
            i++;
        }
    
        return sb.ToString();
    }
    
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So first of all, trim first and replace second, so you have to iterate over a smaller string with your ToLower()

other than that, i think your best algorithm would look like this:

  • Iterate over the string once, and check
    • whether there's any upper case characters
    • whether there's whitespace in beginning and end (and count how many chars you're talking about)
  • if none of the above, return the original string
  • if upper case but no whitespace: do ToLower and return
  • if whitespace:
    • allocate a new string with the right size (original length - number of white chars)
    • fill it in while doing the ToLower
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I'm pretty sure that you'll find that Trim and ToLower both return the original string if they do not change the string, so your "optimization" actually adds more work. –  OldFart Oct 9 '14 at 19:32

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