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I would like to provide a WHERE condition on an inner query by specifying innertable.id = outertable.id. However, MySQL (5.0.45) reports "Unknown column 'outertable.id' in 'where clause'". Is this type of query possible?

The inner query is pivoting rows to columns using a GROUP BY. This could be entirely be performed in the outer query, but would possibly incur additional overhead due to the extra joins.

Alternatively, I can leave off the WHERE condition in the inner query and instead specify an ON outertable.id = innerquery.id, but it would then fetch the entire inner query rowset to join again the outer, which is inefficient.

The actual SQL appears below:

select t.ticketid, u.userid, t.fullname, u.loginapi_userid, t.email, tp.subject, tp.contents, a.PhoneNumber, a.Location, a.Extension, a.BusinessUnit, a.Department
from swtickets t
inner join swticketposts tp on t.ticketid = tp.ticketid
inner join swusers u on t.userid = u.userid
left join
  (
  select
  cfv.typeid,
  min(case cfv.customfieldid when 1 then cfv.fieldvalue end) as 'PhoneNumber',
  min(case cfv.customfieldid when 3 then cfv.fieldvalue end) as 'Location',
  min(case cfv.customfieldid when 5 then cfv.fieldvalue end) as 'Extension',
  min(case cfv.customfieldid when 8 then cfv.fieldvalue end) as 'BusinessUnit',
  min(case cfv.customfieldid when 9 then cfv.fieldvalue end) as 'Department'
  from swcustomfieldvalues cfv
  where cfv.typeid = t.ticketid
  group by cfv.typeid
  ) as a on 1 = 1
where t.ticketid = 2458;
share|improve this question
2  
My original question is, "Is this type of query possible?" (in relation to MySQL 5.0). Changing schema or schlepping on application code is outside the question topic. –  Taylor Gerring Feb 10 '09 at 15:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 20 down vote accepted

The answer to your question is no, it is not possible to reference correlation names as you are doing. The derived table is produced by your inner query before the outer query starts evaluating joins. So the correlation names like t, tp, and u are not available to the inner query.

To solve this, I'd recommend using the same constant integer value in the inner query, and then join the derived table in the outer query using a real condition instead of 1=1.

SELECT t.ticketid, u.userid, t.fullname, u.loginapi_userid, t.email,
  tp.subject, tp.contents, a.PhoneNumber, a.Location, a.Extension,
  a.BusinessUnit, a.Department
FROM swtickets t
 INNER JOIN swticketposts tp ON (t.ticketid = tp.ticketid)
 INNER JOIN swusers u ON (t.userid = u.userid)
 LEFT OUTER JOIN (
  SELECT cfv.typeid,
    MIN(CASE cfv.customfieldid WHEN 1 THEN cfv.fieldvalue END) AS 'PhoneNumber',
    MIN(CASE cfv.customfieldid WHEN 3 THEN cfv.fieldvalue END) AS 'Location',
    MIN(CASE cfv.customfieldid WHEN 5 THEN cfv.fieldvalue END) AS 'Extension',
    MIN(CASE cfv.customfieldid WHEN 8 THEN cfv.fieldvalue END) AS 'BusinessUnit',
    MIN(CASE cfv.customfieldid WHEN 9 THEN cfv.fieldvalue END) AS 'Department'
  FROM swcustomfieldvalues cfv
  WHERE cfv.typeid = 2458
  GROUP BY cfv.typeid
  ) AS a ON (a.typeid = t.ticketid)
WHERE t.ticketid = 2458;
share|improve this answer

I would write it with multiple joins. When you say that it "would possibly incur additional overhead" that tells me that you haven't tested it to be sure. If you have decent indexes the joins should be pretty trivial.

This also shows just one of the pitfalls of the generic "hold everything" table design pattern.

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed. The design is called Entity-Attribute-Value. It breaks normalization in multiple ways, and it's very hard to use. –  Bill Karwin Feb 10 '09 at 2:57
    
Using the "WHERE cfv.typeid = 2458" in the inner query (cfv) causes a nasty table scan on cfv due to simple lack of index, however, leaving out this condition makes things even worse causing a "Using temporary; Using filesort" in addition to an additional table scan on the derived query. –  Taylor Gerring Feb 10 '09 at 15:28
    
I'm not sure what you mean by "inner query". There would be 5 new inner joins, so maybe that's what you mean. I would hope that your CFV table would have an index on typeid. I'd probably have a clustered index on typeid and customfieldid in that order. –  Tom H. Feb 10 '09 at 16:01

You're using the Entity-Attribute-Value design, and there's ultimately no way to make this scalable if you try to generate conventional result sets. Don't try to do this in one query.

Instead, query your normalized tables first:

SELECT t.ticketid, u.userid, t.fullname, u.loginapi_userid, t.email, 
  tp.subject, tp.contents
FROM swtickets t
 INNER JOIN swticketposts tp ON (t.ticketid = tp.ticketid)
 INNER JOIN swusers u ON (t.userid = u.userid)
WHERE t.ticketid = 2458;

Then query your custom fields, with the result on multiple rows of the result set:

SELECT cfv.customfieldid, cfv.fieldvalue
FROM swcustomfieldvalues cfv
WHERE cfv.typeid = 2458;

You'll get multiple rows in the result set, one row for each custom field:

+---------------+--------------+
| customfieldid | fieldvalue   |
+---------------+--------------+
|             1 | 415-555-1234 |
|             3 | Third office |
|             5 | 123          |
|             8 | Support      |
|             9 | Engineering  |
+---------------+--------------+

You then need to write application code to map the result-set fields to the application object fields, in a loop.

Using an Entity-Attribute-Value table in this way is more scalable both in terms of performance and code maintenance.

share|improve this answer
    
This suggestion is accomplishing similar as the original question query (change "where cfv.typeid = t.ticketid" to "where cfv.typeid = 2458"); instead, it depends on code outside the database to perform the pivot. –  Taylor Gerring Feb 10 '09 at 15:00
    
Yes, exactly. In the case of EAV, there's no way to make it efficient in one query. You should do the pivot in application code. –  Bill Karwin Feb 10 '09 at 17:27

My suggestion was going to be what you ruled out on the grounds of efficiency. E.g. leaving out the where clause and using a join (as per t.ticketid = a.ticketid)

Have you been able to prove your thoughts on inefficiency by some concrete examples? I know what you are saying but whatever method you use every row in the outer query is being joined to every row in the inner query so depending on the execution plan it may not be as inefficient as you suspect?

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I imagine the problem is 'cfv.typeid = t.ticketid' then? My thinking about that would be that, while MySQL supports correlated subqueries, what you're trying to do seems like it could fail in a join because the 'inner' query isn't really 'inside' the rest of the query like it is in a WHERE clause. But it looks like you could just take the where clause out of the subquery and make your join condition on a.typeid = t.ticketid.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, that was leftover from another variation of the query. It had nothing to do with the actual error being produced, so I have removed it from the question above. –  Taylor Gerring Feb 9 '09 at 23:13

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