Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Assume I have a template class like this:

template<typename T>
class Foo {};

And a class like:

class PossibleArg
{ typedef int required_type; }

Is it possible to write a static_assert in class Foo which checks if T::required_type is defined?

share|improve this question
    
I'm search for a solution which doesn't require third-party libs like boost. –  cytrinox Mar 14 '11 at 21:18
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Maybe something looks like:

template <typename T>
class Foo {
  static_assert(sizeof(T::required_type) > 0, "Never shows up");
};

EDIT: Other way: SFINAE

template <typename T>
struct has_required_type
{
  typedef char yes[1];
  typedef char no[2];

  template <typename C>
  static yes& test(typename C::required_type*);

  template <typename>
  static no& test(...);

  static const bool value = sizeof(test<T>(0)) == sizeof(yes);
};

template <typename T>
class Foo {
  static_assert(has_required_type<T>::value, "Hasn't required type");
};
share|improve this answer
add comment

You can use BOOST_MPL_HAS_XXX_TRAIT_DEF, in Boost.MPL:

BOOST_MPL_HAS_XXX_TRAIT_DEF( required_type )

BOOST_MPL_ASSERT(( has_required_type< PossibleArg > ));

BOOST_MPL_HAS_XXX_TRAIT_DEF is a macro, taking a name xxx as parameter, which generates a metafunction has_xxx< T > that evaluates to true if T define a nested type named xxx.

(Note that an MPL metafunction is a compile-time function whose result can be accessed using ::type. The result in this case is a compile-time boolean constant(i.e. a bool_.)

share|improve this answer
add comment

If your goal is to get a compiler error if T doesn't have a required_type you could just typedef it in Foo. Or am I missing something?

template<typename T>
class Foo {
  typedef typename T::required_type T_required_type;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, thats how I solve the problem for now. But since C++0x defines static_assert, using it seems a nicer soltion. –  cytrinox Mar 14 '11 at 21:20
add comment

If you're actually looking for static_assert, there's something similar over here - Static assert without boost or C++0x

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.