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I have a list of objects MyObjects in a List collection.

The object model is something like:

public class MyModel
{
  int prop1 {get;set;}
  int propn {get;set;}
  int TheIndex {get;set;}
}

I finish a few linq-to-objects queries and I end up with var TheOutputSoFar = ....

TheOutputSoFar contains the list of MyModel but each item in the collection has TheIndex = 0. I'm looking for a way to make TheIndex increment by 1 in each item of the collection. This is what I tried but it's not working:

var OutputDailyAppointments1 = from a in TheOutputSoFar
.Select(a => a).AsEnumerable().Select((a, i) =>
new ViewDailyAppointmentsModel{TheIndex = i};

Any suggestions? Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Don't use Linq for that:

int index = 0;
foreach (var model in TheOutputSoFar)
    model.TheIndex = index++;
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Make the TheIndex property public.

public class MyModel
{
  int prop1 {get;set;}
  int propn {get;set;}
  public int TheIndex {get;set;}
}

var outputDailyAppointments1 = TheOutputSoFar.Select((a, i) =>
    new ViewDailyAppointmentsModel{TheIndex = i});

But I'm not sure why you're using TheOutputSoFar to create indexes, you can do

var outputDailyAppointments1 = Enumerable.Range(0, TheOutputSoFar.Count())
    .Select( i => new ViewDailyAppointmentsModel{TheIndex = i});
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You should be careful about how you structure your code. LINQ should be used to model queries, not as a means to mutate objects.

Your code (as posted) has a number of potential problems. For instance, the result of Select((a,i) => new ViewDailyAppointmentsModel{...} is a query. It is not actually mutating your collection ... it will produce a new collection of model objects each time it is evaluated. The original collection will not reflect any changes. Is this actually your intent?

If the TheIndex property is transient, and only needed when processing the collection, consider moving it out into an anonymous type constructed as part of the query:

public class MyModel
{  
    int prop1 {get;set;}  
    int propn {get;set;}
}

var OutputDailyAppointments1 = TheOutputSoFar
   .Select((a, i) => new {Item = a, TheIndex = i}; // anonymous object captures index

If, on the other hand, you actually want to update your set of objects so each captures its final position in the list, then just use a loop (don't use LINQ for this..):

int position = 0;
foreach( var item in TheOutpuSoFar )
{
    item.TheIndex = position++;
}

You should also consider whether the design choice of incorporating the index of an item directly into it's set of properties is what you want. It's generally difficult to maintain consistency in such a model, and it's easy to end up with a collection where the Index property does not correctly reflect its intent. There are a number of potential traps to avoid here - such as confusion if you ever use methods like OrderBy to reorder such items.

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I had a question I wanted to followup with. The reason I need the index is that instead of referring to an object by its ID, I'm referring to it by its index in the collection. I don't want to pass to the client the actual ID of the item he's looking at. So on the page, when I get a json request, it comes in as "the 6th element in the collection" and then I keep the collection in the session where I can then determine the ID of this 6th element. Is this a bad way to do it? –  frenchie Mar 19 '11 at 4:10

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