Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to display a list of records from a database table ordered by some numeric column. The table looks like this:

CREATE TABLE  items (
  position int NOT NULL,
  name varchar(100) NOT NULL,
);
INSERT INTO items (position, name) VALUE
(1, 'first'),
(5, 'second'),
(8, 'third'),
(9, 'fourth'),
(15, 'fifth'),
(20, 'sixth');

Now, the order of the list should change according to a parameter provided by the user. This parameter specifies which record comes first like this:

position = 0
order should be = 1, 5, 8, 9, 15, 20

position = 1
order should be = 20, 1, 5, 8, 9, 15

position = 2
order should be = 15, 20, 1, 5, 8, 9

In other words the last record becomes the first and so on. Can you think of a way to do this in SQL?

I'm using MySQL but an example in any SQL database will do.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
This is a fun problem and I like the variety of solutions. –  Alkini Feb 10 '09 at 22:42

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

See how this works for you. Uses generic SQL so it should be valid for MySql (untested) as well.

DECLARE @user_sort INTEGER
SET @user_sort = 0

SELECT position, name FROM 
(
  SELECT I1.position, I1.name, COUNT(*) AS rownumber, (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM items) AS maxrows
  FROM items I1, items I2
  WHERE I2.position <= I1.position
  GROUP BY I1.position, I1.name
) Q1
ORDER BY 
  CASE WHEN maxrows - rownumber < (@user_sort % maxrows) THEN 1 ELSE 2 END, position

Note: * If the user provided sort index is greater than the row count, the value will wrap to within the valid range. To remove this functionality, remove the "% maxrows" from the ORDER BY.

Results:

SET @user_sort = 0

position    name
1   first
5   second
8   third
9   fourth
15  fifth
20  sixth

SET @user_sort = 1

position    name
20  sixth
1   first
5   second
8   third
9   fourth
15  fifth

SET @user_sort = 2

position    name
15  fifth
20  sixth
1   first
5   second
8   third
9   fourth

SET @user_sort = 9

9   fourth
15  fifth
20  sixth
1   first
5   second
8   third
share|improve this answer
    
This is a great solution. Congratulations. I'll have to see how's the performance of it. –  Bob Bright Feb 10 '09 at 1:21
    
Not bad but the self-join seems unnecessary; see my take on it. –  Alkini Feb 10 '09 at 22:33

Are you sure you want to do this in SQL?

To me, this sounds like you should load the results in a dataset of some sort, and then either re-order them as you want, or position the starting point at the correct position.

Possibly using a linked list.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, doing it in SQL reduces the amount of memory needed on the web server and thus more request can be processed. (The Database is on another server). –  Bob Bright Feb 10 '09 at 1:26
    
Splicing a list on the web server shouldn't be too taxing. A solution like beach's is going to be considerably harder on the database server though, as it involves a self-cross-join which MySQL won't be able to optimize away (check the query plan). –  bobince Feb 10 '09 at 2:22
    
I've never used MySQL so I do not know the performance pitfalls of that server (and couldn't test it). Even with indexed Primary Keys, is the performance in MySQL that bad? I've used this trick in MSSQL many times without problems. But yes, ideally, this should be done outside the database server. –  beach Feb 10 '09 at 3:23
    
This is a little dogmatic, but accomplishing this in the database (with SQL) is arguably better because it isolates the data-related business logic from application code. –  Alkini Feb 10 '09 at 22:38

ORDER BY (FIELD(position, 1, 5, 8, 9, 15, 20) + parameter) % 7

Edit: To make the peanut gallery happy, the general solution is:

ORDER BY (SELECT ix + parameter - 1 FROM (SELECT i.position, @ix := @ix + 1 AS ix FROM (SELECT @ix := 0) AS n, items AS i ORDER BY position) AS s WHERE s.position = items.position) % (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM items)

share|improve this answer
    
Your solution is to hard code the order? What happens when another record is added? I'm sorry but that's not going to work. –  Bob Bright Feb 10 '09 at 1:16
    
I posted a solution for the question asked, not for some other random question. –  chaos Feb 10 '09 at 1:38

I'm riffing on beach's solution here, but eliminating the self-join and only selecting from the items table twice (and using Oracle syntax):

select 
    i.position
  , i.name
from(
  select 
      items.*
    , ( SELECT COUNT(*) FROM items ) AS maxrows
  from items
  order by position
) i
order by 
  case 
    when rownum > maxrows - 2 -- NOTE: change "2" to your "position" variable
      then 1 - 1 / rownum -- pseudo-rownum < 1, still ascending
    else
      rownum
  end
;
share|improve this answer
    
I was wondering where "rownum" came from and guessed you were using oracle (and now see that you stated that.) That is the problem with older versions of MSSQL and MySQL - no rownum. However, the self-join style is portable (which can be useful.) Platform tweaks should be applied if available. –  beach Feb 10 '09 at 23:02
    
That's the portable solution to rownum? Eek! But, fair enough. –  Alkini Feb 10 '09 at 23:18

If it's a set list that you know the number of items you could do something like:

SELECT *
FROM Items
ORDER BY CASE WHEN Position >= Position THEN POSITION ELSE Position+1000 END

But its really ugly.

share|improve this answer
    
I ended up using something similar to this but I'd like to note that this solution doesn't bring the last item to top like it was required. (Ie. the order is wrong) –  Bob Bright Feb 10 '09 at 1:18

This really is not an ideal thing to be doing in SQL.

I have solution, but with large tables it will be slow.

DECLARE @iOrder INT
SET @iOrder = 4

SELECT abc.position,abc.name FROM
(
SELECT position,name,ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY position) AS rownum
FROM items
) abc
WHERE abc.rownum >= @iOrder
UNION ALL
SELECT def.position, def.name FROM
(
SELECT position,name,ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY position) AS rownum
FROM items
) def
WHERE def.rownum < @iOrder

Note that the use of UNION (Without the all) will reorder the results as it'll be looking for duplicates

share|improve this answer

As per John's comment, but with LIMIT syntax instead (ROW_NUMBER/OVER doesn't work in MySQL and besides LIMIT is much easier to read):

(
    SELECT position, name FROM items
    ORDER BY position
    LIMIT @offset, @bignum
) UNION ALL (
    SELECT position, name FROM items
    ORDER BY position
    LIMIT @offset
)

Where @bignum is an arbitrary number higher than any number of results you might have.

I'm still not wholly convinced this will in practice be faster than rearranging the list on the web server... would depend exactly how you were dealing with the result set and how big it was, I suppose. But at least it avoids the self-cross-join involved in beach's clever approach.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.