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The purpose of my question is to strengthen my knowledge base with Python and get a better picture of it, which includes knowing its faults and surprises. To keep things specific, I'm only interested in the CPython interpreter.

I'm looking for something similar to what learned from my PHP landmines question where some of the answers were well known to me but a couple were borderline horrifying.

Update: Apparently one maybe two people are upset that I asked a question that's already partially answered outside of Stack Overflow. As some sort of compromise here's the URL http://www.ferg.org/projects/python_gotchas.html

Note that one or two answers here already are original from what was written on the site referenced above.

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Not sure if there are much 'gotchas' moving from 2.5 to 2.6, if your intention is the python 2.X series in general, it may be better to change the title to 2.X. –  monkut Feb 10 '09 at 0:28
    
@monkut good point! –  David Feb 10 '09 at 1:10
    
What was wrong with the list in ferg.org/projects/python_gotchas.html ? –  S.Lott Feb 10 '09 at 2:19
    
@S. Lott - Nothing wrong with it, just that I didn't know about it and no one's asked this question in SO. –  David Feb 10 '09 at 4:29
1  
@hop The top rated answer right now for this question isn't mentioned in the ferg.org page. Maybe if Guido had written the ferg.org page and I had known about it, then I wouldn't have bothered, but no one singular person knows everything. –  David Feb 10 '09 at 18:40

18 Answers 18

Expressions in default arguments are calculated when the function is defined, not when it’s called.

Example: consider defaulting an argument to the current time:

>>>import time
>>> def report(when=time.time()):
...     print when
...
>>> report()
1210294387.19
>>> time.sleep(5)
>>> report()
1210294387.19

The when argument doesn't change. It is evaluated when you define the function. It won't change until the application is re-started.

Strategy: you won't trip over this if you default arguments to None and then do something useful when you see it:

>>> def report(when=None):
...     if when is None:
...         when = time.time()
...     print when
...
>>> report()
1210294762.29
>>> time.sleep(5)
>>> report()
1210294772.23

Exercise: to make sure you've understood: why is this happening?

>>> def spam(eggs=[]):
...     eggs.append("spam")
...     return eggs
...
>>> spam()
['spam']
>>> spam()
['spam', 'spam']
>>> spam()
['spam', 'spam', 'spam']
>>> spam()
['spam', 'spam', 'spam', 'spam']
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Excellent point! I actually have relied on this in a similar context, but I could easily see this catching the unwary off guard! –  David Feb 10 '09 at 1:34
    
That's the most well known gotcha, but I've never been bitten by it before knowing it. –  hasenj Feb 10 '09 at 1:44
    
The same is true for class level variables (an easy mistake to make when first learning python) –  Richard Levasseur Feb 10 '09 at 7:30
3  
The Python designers made a lot of good design decisions, but this was no one of them. +1 –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft May 25 '10 at 18:46
1  
You could use tuple instead of list as default argument. In general - default values should be of unchangeable type (NoneType, int, tuple etc.) –  Abgan Apr 15 '11 at 6:43

You should be aware of how class variables are handled in Python. Consider the following class hierarchy:

class AAA(object):
    x = 1

class BBB(AAA):
    pass

class CCC(AAA):
    pass

Now, check the output of the following code:

>>> print AAA.x, BBB.x, CCC.x
1 1 1
>>> BBB.x = 2
>>> print AAA.x, BBB.x, CCC.x
1 2 1
>>> AAA.x = 3
>>> print AAA.x, BBB.x, CCC.x
3 2 3

Surprised? You won't be if you remember that class variables are internally handled as dictionaries of a class object. If a variable name is not found in the dictionary of current class, the parent classes are searched for it. So, the following code again, but with explanations:

# AAA: {'x': 1}, BBB: {}, CCC: {}
>>> print AAA.x, BBB.x, CCC.x
1 1 1
>>> BBB.x = 2
# AAA: {'x': 1}, BBB: {'x': 2}, CCC: {}
>>> print AAA.x, BBB.x, CCC.x
1 2 1
>>> AAA.x = 3
# AAA: {'x': 3}, BBB: {'x': 2}, CCC: {}
>>> print AAA.x, BBB.x, CCC.x
3 2 3

Same goes for handling class variables in class instances (treat this example as a continuation of the one above):

>>> a = AAA()
# a: {}, AAA: {'x': 3}
>>> print a.x, AAA.x
3 3
>>> a.x = 4
# a: {'x': 4}, AAA: {'x': 3}
>>> print a.x, AAA.x
4 3
share|improve this answer

Loops and lambdas (or any closure, really): variables are bound by name

funcs = []
for x in range(5):
  funcs.append(lambda: x)

[f() for f in funcs]
# output:
# 4 4 4 4 4

A work around is either creating a separate function or passing the args by name:

funcs = []
for x in range(5):
  funcs.append(lambda x=x: x)
[f() for f in funcs]
# output:
# 0 1 2 3 4
share|improve this answer
1  
outputs should be 4 4 4 4 4 and 0 1 2 3 4 –  Hammer Jul 10 '13 at 16:40
    
@hammer: fixed, thanks –  Richard Levasseur Jul 11 '13 at 18:04

Dynamic binding makes typos in your variable names surprisingly hard to find. It's easy to spend half an hour fixing a trivial bug.

EDIT: an example...

for item in some_list:
    ... # lots of code
... # more code
for tiem in some_other_list:
    process(item) # oops!
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Yeah that's kind of screwed me up once or twice, any chance you could provide an example in your answer though? –  David Feb 9 '09 at 23:46
5  
It's kinda your fault if you have "lots of code" in one function .. –  hasenj Feb 10 '09 at 1:43
2  
I suppose so, but this was just for illustration's sake. Actual ocurrences of this type of bug tend to be a bit more involved. –  Algorias Feb 10 '09 at 21:44
7  
You can use static checkers like PyLint to find these mistakes -- tiem would be marked as an unused variable. –  DzinX Apr 7 '11 at 9:13
try:
    int("z")
except IndexError, ValueError:
    pass

reason this doesn't work is because IndexError is the type of exception you're catching, and ValueError is the name of the variable you're assigning the exception to.

Correct code to catch multiple exceptions is:

try:
    int("z")
except (IndexError, ValueError):
    pass
share|improve this answer

There was a lot of discussion on hidden language features a while back: hidden-features-of-python. Where some pitfalls were mentioned (and some of the good stuff too).

Also you might want to check out Python Warts.

But for me, integer division's a gotcha:

>>> 5/2
2

You probably wanted:

>>> 5*1.0/2
2.5

If you really want this (C-like) behaviour, you should write:

>>> 5//2
2

As that will work with floats too (and it will work when you eventually go to Python 3):

>>> 5*1.0//2
2.0

GvR explains how integer division came to work how it does on the history of Python.

share|improve this answer
3  
Definitely a gotcha. It's gotten so than adding "from future import division" to every new .py file I create is practically a reflex. –  Chris Upchurch Feb 10 '09 at 19:18
1  
Makes sense supposing that 5 and 2 are actually variables. Otherwise you could just write 5./2 –  Algorias Feb 10 '09 at 21:46
    
Why are you multiplying by 1.0? Wouldn't it be just as easy to make 5 be 5.0 or float(5) in case 5 is hidden in a variable. –  Nope Jul 27 '09 at 17:31
17  
"The correct work-around is subtle: casting an argument to float() is wrong if it could be a complex number; adding 0.0 to an argument doesn't preserve the sign of the argument if it was minus zero. The only solution without either downside is multiplying an argument (typically the first) by 1.0. This leaves the value and sign unchanged for float and complex, and turns int and long into a float with the corresponding value." (PEP 238 - python.org/dev/peps/pep-0238) –  Tom Dunham Jul 28 '09 at 16:15
    
Tom, thanks...guess i didn't know this :) –  Nope Jul 29 '09 at 3:08

Not including an __init__.py in your packages. That one still gets me sometimes.

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One of the biggest surprises I ever had with Python is this one:

a = ([42],)
a[0] += [43, 44]

This works as one might expect, except for raising a TypeError after updating the first entry of the tuple! So a will be ([42, 43, 44],) after executing the += statement, but there will be an exception anyway. If you try this on the other hand

a = ([42],)
b = a[0]
b += [43, 44]

you won't get an error.

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1  
Or you could simply write: a[0].extend([43, 44]). –  DzinX Apr 7 '11 at 9:17
1  
Wow. I consider changing and raising an exception afterwards a bug in Python. Any reason why this might be just a wart? –  Alfe Sep 5 '12 at 12:24
    
WOW. I expected the error, but I didn't expect it to actually modify the list too. That's ugly. However, I don't believe I've ever run into this because I make a habit of not using tuples with data that I want to change. Even if it points to the same list, I'd rather the values remain immutable. If I want to have positional elements that can change, I'd either use a list, dictionary or class. –  johannestaas Feb 7 at 21:58

List slicing has caused me a lot of grief. I actually consider the following behavior a bug.

Define a list x

>>> x = [10, 20, 30, 40, 50]

Access index 2:

>>> x[2]
30

As you expect.

Slice the list from index 2 and to the end of the list:

>>> x[2:]
[30, 40, 50]

As you expect.

Access index 7:

>>> x[7]
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
IndexError: list index out of range

Again, as you expect.

However, try to slice the list from index 7 until the end of the list:

>>> x[7:]
[]

???

The remedy is to put a lot of tests when using list slicing. I wish I'd just get an error instead. Much easier to debug.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree. It really hides those one-off bugs. –  johannestaas Feb 7 at 21:49

The only gotcha/surprise I've dealt with is with CPython's GIL. If for whatever reason you expect python threads in CPython to run concurrently... well they're not and this is pretty well documented by the Python crowd and even Guido himself.

A long but thorough explanation of CPython threading and some of the things going on under the hood and why true concurrency with CPython isn't possible. http://jessenoller.com/2009/02/01/python-threads-and-the-global-interpreter-lock/

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2  
check out the new multiprocessing module available in 2.6 for thread-like handling using separate processes if the GIL is bothering you. docs.python.org/library/multiprocessing.html –  monkut Feb 10 '09 at 0:26
    
@monkut - Definitely looks cool, I swore I was reading about something similar to this module a year or so ago. –  David Feb 10 '09 at 4:30
1  
@David - must have been pyprocessing which has been made part of the standard libraries under the guise of multiprocessing –  Ravi Jul 26 '09 at 8:48

James Dumay eloquently reminded me of another Python gotcha:

Not all of Python's “included batteries” are wonderful.

James’ specific example was the HTTP libraries: httplib, urllib, urllib2, urlparse, mimetools, and ftplib. Some of the functionality is duplicated, and some of the functionality you'd expect is completely absent, e.g. redirect handling. Frankly, it's horrible.

If I ever have to grab something via HTTP these days, I use the urlgrabber module forked from the Yum project.

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I remember a couple years back giving up trying to accomplish what I wanted with the suite of tools above and ended up using pyCurl. –  David Feb 12 '09 at 3:03
2  
The fact that there's a module named urllib and a module named urllib2 still gets under my skin. –  Jason Baker Aug 26 '09 at 12:06
1  
This is probably the real reason for Python 3 :) They got to the point of, 'wait, where's the... let's start over'. –  orokusaki Jan 7 '10 at 6:39
1  
what's wrong with ftplib exactly? –  Giampaolo Rodolà Jan 7 '12 at 14:24

Unintentionally mixing oldstyle and newstyle classes can cause seemingly mysterious errors.

Say you have a simple class hierarchy consisting of superclass A and subclass B. When B is instantiated, A's constructor must be called first. The code below correctly does this:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = 1

class B(A):
    def __init__(self):
        super(B, self).__init__()
        self.b = 1

b = B()

But if you forget to make A a newstyle class and define it like this:

class A:
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = 1

you get this traceback:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "AB.py", line 11, in <module>
    b = B()
  File "AB.py", line 7, in __init__
    super(B, self).__init__()
TypeError: super() argument 1 must be type, not classobj

Two other questions relating to this issue are 489269 and 770134

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Floats are not printed at full precision by default (without repr):

x = 1.0 / 3
y = 0.333333333333
print x  #: 0.333333333333
print y  #: 0.333333333333
print x == y  #: False

repr prints too many digits:

print repr(x)  #: 0.33333333333333331
print repr(y)  #: 0.33333333333300003
print x == 0.3333333333333333  #: True
share|improve this answer
    
This is a compromise so that the float string is reasonably portable across python's platforms, since python uses hardware floats. –  u0b34a0f6ae Aug 26 '09 at 9:03
def f():
    x += 1

x = 42
f()

results in an UnboundLocalError, because local names are detected statically. A different example would be

def f():
    print x
    x = 43

x = 42
f()
share|improve this answer
    
If you use global x inside of f(), that will allow you to reference variables outside of f's scope. –  David Feb 21 '11 at 18:46
    
@David: I know why you get an error. The point of the post is that most people don't expect to get an error here, so it's a gotcha. –  Sven Marnach Feb 21 '11 at 21:20
    
I was commenting more for the sake of others, not all but most of the gotchas here have solutions. For myself, I didn't even know about the global symbol/operator until two years after I started using Python. –  David Feb 22 '11 at 6:25
    
Using global variables such as that is a bad code smell, anyways. I'm glad you didn't come across it till 2 years in. Means you're not getting functions to perform on global scope variables. –  Zoran Pavlovic Dec 18 '12 at 8:40
    
@ZoranPavlovic: You get the same issue when using closures instead of global variables. A counter implemented as a closure would be perfectly reasonable, but you have to be careful. –  Sven Marnach Dec 18 '12 at 20:29

You cannot use locals()['x'] = whatever to change local variable values as you might expect.

This works:

>>> x = 1
>>> x
1
>>> locals()['x'] = 2
>>> x
2

BUT:

>>> def test():
...     x = 1
...     print x
...     locals()['x'] = 2
...     print x  # *** prints 1, not 2 ***
...
>>> test()
1
1

This actually burnt me in an answer here on SO, since I had tested it outside a function and got the change I wanted. Afterwards, I found it mentioned and contrasted to the case of globals() in "Dive Into Python." See example 8.12. (Though it does not note that the change via locals() will work at the top level as I show above.)

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locals() at module level is the same thing as globals() anywhere in the module, is it not? It notes that globals() will take the change. –  u0b34a0f6ae Aug 26 '09 at 9:07

Using class variables when you want instance variables. Most of the time this doesn't cause problems, but if it's a mutable value it causes surprises.

class Foo(object):
    x = {}

But:

>>> f1 = Foo()
>>> f2 = Foo()
>>> f1.x['a'] = 'b'
>>> f2.x
{'a': 'b'}

You almost always want instance variables, which require you to assign inside __init__:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.x = {}
share|improve this answer
    
I've seen a few people caught off guard with this problem, especially those going from PHP. –  David May 16 at 15:37

Python 2 has some surprising behaviour with comparisons:

>>> print x
0
>>> print y
1
>>> x < y
False

What's going on? repr() to the rescue:

>>> print "x: %r, y: %r" % (x, y)
x: '0', y: 1
share|improve this answer
    
This is actually fixed in Python 3: TypeError: unorderable types: str() < int(). –  Simeon Visser Oct 1 at 16:39

If you assign to a variable inside a function, Python assumes that the variable is defined inside that function:

>>> x = 1
>>> def increase_x():
...     x += 1
... 
>>> increase_x()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in increase_x
UnboundLocalError: local variable 'x' referenced before assignment

Use global x (or nonlocal x in Python 3) to declare you want to set a variable defined outside your function.

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