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Hi all first post here :) Let's start with a snippet of the code I'm using:

public MyClass : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
  private static MyClass _instance;
  public static MyClass Instance
  {
      get
      {
          if (_instance == null)
              _instance = new MyClass();
          return _instance;
      }
  }

  private bool _myProperty;
  public bool MyProperty
  {
      get
      {
        return _myProperty;
      }
      set
      {
          if (_myProperty!= value)
          {
              _myProperty= value;
              NotifyPropertyChanged("MyProperty");
          }
      }
   }

   private MyClass() { ... }
}

As you can see, it's a singleton class. In my view, I want to bind a control on MyProperty. My initial idea was to import MyClass as a static ressource in my view using something like:

<UserControl x:Class="Metrics.Silverlight.ChartView"
  xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
  xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
  xmlns:logic="clr-namespace:Metrics.Logic;assembly=Metrics.Logic">
  <UserControl.Resources>
    <logic:MyClass x:Key="myClass" />
  </UserControl.Resources>
</UserControl>

And bind it like so:

<Button Margin="5" Click="btnName_Click"  Visibility="{Binding Source={StaticResource myClass}, Converter={StaticResource visibilityConverter}, Path=MyAttribute, Mode=OneWay}">

Of course, this approach won't work since MyClass constructor's is private. I also cannot use x:static since it's not available in Silverlight 4.

I've been stuck on this problem far longer than I should have... How can I bind on MyProperty?

Any ideas?

Thanks in advance!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could have your UserControl, internally, expose the MyClass instance through it's own property, and bind locally to it's own "MyClass" instance. Since it's a Singleton, this will always be the same instance.

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Hi M. Copsey, I'd like to try out your suggestion, but I must admit that I don't quite understand how to approach this. I'm still new to silverlight/xaml programming. I'd appreciate if you could elaborate :) –  Tigel Mar 15 '11 at 12:38
    
@Tigel: This is basically the same as Elad's option listed below. I was just recommending leaving your singleton alone, but having a property in your control itself (non-static) that returns the singleton. –  Reed Copsey Mar 15 '11 at 16:04
    
Alright problem solved. Thanks for your help gentlemen! @Vladimir Dorokhov @Reed Copsey @Elad Katz –  Tigel Mar 15 '11 at 17:16

I advice to add additional class MyClassProvider:

public class MyClassProvider
{
    public MyClass MyClass { get { return MyClass.Instance; } }
}

Instance of this class you can place anywhere and bind to its MyClass property.

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You could implement the singleton slightly differently, like so:

  private static MyClass _instance;
  public MyClass Instance // note the getter is not static
  {
      get
      {
          if (_instance == null)
              _instance = new MyClass();
          return _instance;
      }
  }

so now you could do the following in xaml:

<UserControl x:Class="Metrics.Silverlight.ChartView"
  <UserControl.Resources>
    <logic:MyClass x:Key="myClass" />
  </UserControl.Resources>
</UserControl>

and bind it like this:

<Button Margin="5" Click="btnName_Click"  Visibility="{Binding Source={StaticResource myClass}, Converter={StaticResource visibilityConverter}, Path=Instance.MyAttribute, Mode=OneWay}">

notice that the singleton still is a singleton, but we just bypass Silverlight's missing static by not setting the getter as static.

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I'll have to wait till tomorrow to try this out, but this looks like a fine workaround. However, is it considered good practice to not have a static getter on a static member? What is the consequence of not having the getter static? –  Tigel Mar 15 '11 at 2:02
    
not too much.. it's used very often when implementing MVVM in Silverlight, in the ViewModelLocator pattern that was purposed by laurent Bugnion (mvvmlight). It's widely accepted. –  Elad Katz Mar 15 '11 at 2:05
    
I remembered that in some places in my code I need to access my singleton via a "MyClass.Instance.SomeMethod" call. This will not be possible if the getter is not static. –  Tigel Mar 15 '11 at 12:29
    
you can expose also a static member.. but come to think of it, @vladimir's solution is better than mine. –  Elad Katz Mar 15 '11 at 14:28

I have verified the following is working in Silverlight 5:

Keep your class MyClass unchanged, then create an property of MyClass with the name of MyClass in your business UserControl class:

public MyClass MyClass
{
    get { return <Namespace>.MyClass.Instance; }
}

Then in your business UserControl XAML, do binding like this:

<TextBlock Text="Visibility Test" Visiblity="{Binding Path=MyClass.MyProperty, Converter={somexmlns:SomeVisiblityConverterIfNecessary}", ElementName="yourBusinessUserControlName"/>

Once some where in your application, MyClass.Instance.MyProperty (here MyClass is the class name) changes the value of MyProperty, the above binding will be updated.

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This should work in Silverlight 4 & WP7.1 too. –  Justin XL Jun 19 '12 at 2:43

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