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Hello I'm trying to write a CUDA kernel to perform the following piece of code.

for (n = 0; n < (total-1); n++)
{
  a = values[n];

  for ( i = n+1; i < total ; i++)
  {
    b = values[i] - a;
    c = b*b;

    if( c < 10)
        newvalues[i] = c;
    }
}

This is what I have currently, but it does not seem to be giving the correct results? does anyone know what I'm doing wrong. Cheers

__global__ void calc(int total, float *values, float *newvalues){

float a,b,c;

int idx = blockIdx.x * blockDim.x + threadIdx.x;

for (int n = idx; n < (total-1); n += blockDim.x*gridDim.x){
    a = values[n];

    for(int i = n+1; i < total; i++){
        b = values[i] - a;
        c = b*b;

    if( c < 10)
        newvalues[i] = c;

    }
}
share|improve this question
    
What is p in for ( i = n+1; p < total ; p++) ? –  ypercube Mar 15 '11 at 0:16
    
Typo. Sorry, should have been an i –  Roger Mar 15 '11 at 0:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Realize this problem in 2D and launch your kernel with 2D thread blocks. The total number of threads in x and y dimension will be equal to total . The kernel code should look like this:

__global__ void calc(float *values, float *newvalues, int total){


float a,b,c;

int n= blockIdy.y * blockDim.y + threadIdx.y;
int i= blockIdx.x * blockDim.x + threadIdx.x;

  if (n>=total || i>=total)
        return;

a = values[n];
b = values[i] - a;
c = b*b;
 if( c < 10)
        newvalues[i] = c;  

// I don't know your problem statement but i think it should be like: newvalues[n*total+i] = c;  


}

Update:

This is how you should call the kernel

dim3 block(16,16);
dim3 grid (  (total+15)/16,  (total+15)/16  );
calc<<<grid,block>>>(float *val, float *newval, int T);

Also make sure you add this line in kernel (see updated kernel)

if (n>=total || i>=total)
return;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I will try and see if this works –  Roger Mar 15 '11 at 8:49
    
Just a thought, I will call the kernel like this <<<x,1>>> where x is dim2 (total,total) or something like that? How could I take into account the outer loop is only to (total-1) Cheers –  Roger Mar 15 '11 at 8:58
    
kindly check the updated answer –  Jawad Masood Mar 15 '11 at 11:26
    
Thank you. May I ask why you've chosen 16? –  Roger Mar 15 '11 at 23:12
    
A 16x16 block has 256 threads. I chose this as a safe measure so that code will run on all cuda capable cards. One should be aware of bottlenecks and limitation of the card they are using. Fermi architecture supports 1024 threads per block while previous generations support only 512 threads per block. So you can make a block of size 32x32 for compute capability 2.0 (fermi) or greater. For cards having compute capabitly less than 2.0 you need to keep block size under or equal 22x22. Read this: blog.cuvilib.com/2010/06/09/… –  Jawad Masood Mar 16 '11 at 5:36

I'll probably be way wrong but the n < (total-1) check in

for (int n = idx; n < (total-1); n += blockDim.x*gridDim.x)

seems different than the original version.

share|improve this answer

Why don't you just remove the outter loop and start the kernel with as many threads as you need for this loop? It's a bit weird to have a loop that depends on your blockId. Normally you try to avoid these loops. Secondly it seems to me that newvalues[i] can be overriden by different threads.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not quite sure how to do that. Do you mean start the outer loop with (total-1) threads? I think you are right that newvalues[i] can be overwritten. What if I changed the code to newvalues[i] += c, would this sum the contribution from each thread? –  Roger Mar 15 '11 at 1:18
    
It would be much less problematic, but still problematic. Imagine the following scenario: Thread 1 loads newvalue[i] and modifies it. Before Thread 1 writes it to global memory, Thread 2 reads newvalue[i] to modify it too. You could use atomic Add or a form of reduce at the end of your kernel –  moggi Mar 15 '11 at 2:59
    
At the moment you use the outer for loop to iterate sevral times in one thread, but normaly you use CUDA in that way, that you start as much threads as you have iterations. So each thread will compute just one iteration of the outer loop. Only if you have more iterations than threads you can start, you must think about some form of a loop in your kernel. But your inner loop should stay in the kernel. –  moggi Mar 15 '11 at 3:06
    
Ah ok. I think that total will only be around 10000 max, so I assume I can have that many threads easily. Perhaps I would then do something like this? kernelcall<<<total-1,1>>>>( ...) and removing the outer for loop. Also, thanks for the atomicadd advise. I tried implementing it but still don't seem to get the right results from the kernel –  Roger Mar 15 '11 at 8:48
    
But your are aware of that your sample code isn't correct either, as it overrides newvalues[i] too? –  moggi Mar 15 '11 at 10:43

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