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This seems like it should be a no-brainer, but I can't get a WPF storyboard to pause. I call Pause and nothing happens -- it keeps right on animating.

Here's a repro case: a button that animates its width. If you click the button, it calls Pause on the storyboard. I would expect that, as soon as I click the button, its width should stop changing; instead its width keeps right on animating as if I never called Pause.

NameScope.SetNameScope(this, new NameScope());
var storyboard = new Storyboard();

var button = new Button { Content = "Pause", Name = "pause" };
this.Content = button;
RegisterName(button.Name, button);
var animation = new DoubleAnimation(0, 200, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5));
Storyboard.SetTargetName(animation, button.Name);
Storyboard.SetTargetProperty(animation,
    new PropertyPath(FrameworkElement.WidthProperty));
storyboard.Children.Add(animation);

button.Click += (sender, e) => { storyboard.Pause(this); };
storyboard.Begin(this);

From what I understand of the docs, I should call the Pause(FrameworkElement) overload with the same parameter I passed to Begin, hence the Pause(this) above. But I've also tried storyboard.Pause(), with no change in behavior. I also tried storyboard.Pause(button) just for the heck of it, again with no effect. I would have tried storyboard.Pause(storyboard) and storyboard.Pause(animation) just to exhaust the possibilities, but neither one compiles -- it wants a FrameworkElement (or FrameworkContentElement).

How do I get the storyboad to pause?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I don't know why you are using that weired SetNameScope etc. Clearing your code i could make it work:

        //NameScope.SetNameScope(this, new NameScope());
        var storyboard = new Storyboard();

        var button = new Button { Content = "Pause", Name = "pause" };
        this.Content = button;
        //RegisterName(button.Name, button);
        var animation = new DoubleAnimation(0, 200, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5));
        Storyboard.SetTarget(animation, button);
        Storyboard.SetTargetProperty(animation,
            new PropertyPath(FrameworkElement.WidthProperty));
        storyboard.Children.Add(animation);

        button.Click += (sender, e) => { storyboard.Pause(); };
        storyboard.Begin();
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Huh. The MSDN docs insist that you must set a name scope, but your version is (a) simpler and (b) works. I'll take it. –  Joe White Mar 15 '11 at 0:52
    
I have to say I'm a little baffled.. I've been programming WPF for 5 years now, and that's the first time I've ever seen the usage of NameScope & RegisterName... :-/ –  Elad Katz Mar 15 '11 at 0:55
    
Looks like the magic combination of code changes is to (a) use SetTarget instead of SetTargetName, and (b) use the parameterless Begin and Pause instead of passing this. The NameScope is harmless, though unnecessary when using SetTarget. –  Joe White Mar 15 '11 at 0:57
    
yeah, well... i just removed everything i never use and it worked ;-) –  Elad Katz Mar 15 '11 at 0:59
    
The docs that insist on NameScope / RegisterName are here: "Storyboards Overview" msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms742868.aspx. I don't know why they say that -- I like your version a lot better. –  Joe White Mar 15 '11 at 0:59

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