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I was writing a program that tell the user to input a random string, and then print out all the duplicates and the number of time each of them repeats. I was running it through gdb and this is the output:

Here is the program:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
  //Read a string word by word and put into a vector
  //loop through the vector:
  //  If there are two words duplicate:
  //    loop through another vector (used to store duplicate word)
  //    compare if these two words are the same as the duplicate word stored
  //      If the same: ++count[i]
  //      If not: push_back(count) ; ++count[i]

  string word;
  vector<string> sentence;
  vector<string> duplicate;
  vector<int> times;
  int count = 1;

  while (cin >> word) {
    if (word == "ctrlz") {
      break;
    }
  sentence.push_back(word);    
  }

  vector<string>::size_type i = 0;
  vector<string>::size_type j = 0;

  while (i != sentence.size()) {
    if (sentence[i] == sentence[i+1]) {
      while (j != sentence.size()) {
        if (duplicate.size() == 0) {
          duplicate.push_back(sentence[i]);
          times.push_back(count);
          ++times[0];
        }
        else { 
          if (sentence[i] != duplicate[j]) {
            duplicate.push_back(sentence[i]);
            times.push_back(count);
            ++times[j+1];          
          }
          else {
            ++times[j];
          }
        }
      ++j;
      }
    }
  ++i;  
  }

  while (i != duplicate.size()) {
    cout << duplicate[i] << ' ';
    ++i;
  }

  return 0;
}


I got this after running gdb:

(gdb) run 
Starting program: /home/phongcao/C++/6.12
phong phong phong phong phong phong 
ctrlz

Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
0x001c58d9 in std::string::size() const () from /usr/lib/libstdc++.so.6 
(gdb) 


What does this output mean? How can I fix this segmentation fault?

share|improve this question
2  
Show the code and we'll be able to help you more. Odds are the code has a buffer overflow somewhere or it's deleteing or freeing something it shouldn't. –  user470379 Mar 15 '11 at 0:53
    
I suspect your program has overwritten the stack - but we need to see some code to suggest things - or you need to run valgrind or similar –  Mark Mar 15 '11 at 0:54
2  
@AbiusX 5% is awfully generous. –  user470379 Mar 15 '11 at 0:56
1  
@AbiusX: No. I think your inexperience makes you wrong. I think your claims without proof make you wrong. I think you are wrong because the bug is obvious (its in the code). Every claim I have come across that blaims the compiler (apart from 2) have always been show to be in the user code. Its usally shoddy handling of pointers or overrunning the end of the array. I bet every time you have claimed this nonsense valgrind would have shown you were wrong. To claim its a compiler bug you better also come up with the appropriate bug number to show you know what you are talking about –  Loki Astari Mar 15 '11 at 22:10
1  
@Martin: Well, from your anger I can easily guess that you're a programmer with average error in 100 LOC. My test results indicate i have below 1 errors in 100 lines of codes. Thats why all your problems with GCC were programmers fault and not mine. –  AbiusX Mar 15 '11 at 23:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Some bugs:

if (sentence[i] == sentence[i+1]) {

Your loop permits i to be size()-1 - So you're reading one past the end of the vector sentence.

while (i != sentence.size()) {
    while (j != sentence.size()) {
     ...
     ++j;
   }
   ++i;
}

j is never reset - next iteration of the outer loop it'll start at sentence.size() - You likely don't want that.

You should solve this with a std::map<std::string, int>:

std::map<std::string, int> words;
while (cin >> word) {
    if (word == "ctrlz") {
         break;
    }
    words[word] += 1;
}
for (std::map<std::string>::const_iterator it = words.begin(); it != words.end(); ++it) { 
     if (it->second > 1) {
         cout << it->second << " copies of " << it->first << endl;
     }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Assuming g++ is being used, adding -D_GLIBCXX_DEBUG to compile line is a good way to catch such bugs. –  Employed Russian Mar 15 '11 at 17:56

Rather than running it in gdb, run it in valgrind (technically "memcheck" is the name of the default tool it comes with). This will probably point right away to the source of your problems (which may or may not be exactly the place where it finally crashes).

share|improve this answer

Your problem is right here: if (sentence[i] == sentence[i+1])

On the last iteration of the loop, i == sentence.size()-1, and i+1 == sentence.size() which is outside the bounds of the vector.

In addition, ++times[j+1]; assumes you've already push_backed j+2 integers, but on the first time through the loop, you've only push_backed j+1 integers.

share|improve this answer

Segmentation Fault happens when you try to access (read/write) memory that is far away from your programs variables, e.g:

char s[100];
int a=100000;
s[a]=2;

So you should be looking for array indexes, and pointers and ensure they're pointing to your application memories. Also sending small arrays or unallocated pointers to functions that assume they have enough memory causes the same error (inside that function).

string.h functions assume you have made memory for them.

share|improve this answer
    
why negative??? –  AbiusX Mar 15 '11 at 1:12

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