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Is there a safe way to auto assign the keys in a posted array? Below are two examples of wrong ways...

foreach( $_POST as $key => $value ) {
     $$key = $value;
}

or

extract($_POST)

Is there a better way, or is it best to code:

$foo = $_POST('foo');
$bar = $_POST('bar');
....

for all 50 inputs on my form?

(the posted info will be inserted into a database).

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5  
It is best to refer to them with $_POST['variablename']. –  Orbling Mar 15 '11 at 1:23
1  
What do you want to do with them afterwards, thats the question. –  AbiusX Mar 15 '11 at 1:25
    
I know you're against extract (wisely) but what about making use of the prefix (and overwriting) options? See php.net/extract for more details. I'd think that should leave you safe enough? –  Alistair Mar 15 '11 at 1:25
4  
Both of your versions are simply trying to recreate the utterly moronic PHP "register_globals". The parents of the original PHP developer(s) responsible for that should've been burned at the stake to prevent it ever having been conceived of. –  Marc B Mar 15 '11 at 1:25
    
@Alistair: Depends on the prefixed used, can still get accidental/tainted overrides, if your prefix matches the start of any variables. –  Orbling Mar 15 '11 at 1:28

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

There is not a single reason to do it.
To handle user inputs an array is 100 times better than separate variables

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@superUntitled I'd rather assign it to another array in case of printing it back into form –  Your Common Sense Mar 15 '11 at 1:49
    
I do not think I am quite getting it... so you would recommend something like: foreach($_POST as $key=>$value) { $vars[$key] = $value; } –  superUntitled Mar 15 '11 at 2:00
1  
@superUntitled no, just $FORM = array_map('htmlspecialchars',$_POST); –  Your Common Sense Mar 15 '11 at 2:14
    
If you're going to put the data into a database, don't blanket HTML-escape it. Only do that if you're going to output it to HTML. –  deceze Mar 15 '11 at 2:51
    
@deceze there was another comment, dunno where it gone. The OP was going to print it out, to show form back in case of errors I suppose –  Your Common Sense Mar 15 '11 at 10:24

One more cautios way of extracting all input fields at once is:

extract( $_POST, EXTR_OVERWRITE, "form_" );

This way all your input variables will be called $form_foo and $form_bar at least. Avoid doing that in the global scope - not because global is evil, but because nobody ever cleans up there.

However since mostly you do that in a localized scope, you can as well apply htmlentities if for example you need all fields just for output:

extract(array_map("htmlspecialchars", $_POST), EXTR_OVERWRITE, "form_");
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haha just what i was writing now. +1 anyway i used it only on eg. $_POST['new_entry'] –  Valerij Mar 15 '11 at 1:31
    
is there a potential for a security threat with this method... is it bulletproof? –  superUntitled Mar 15 '11 at 1:45
    
@superUntitled: As I said on the comments to the question: "Depends on the prefixed used, can still get accidental/tainted overrides, if your prefix matches the start of any variables." –  Orbling Mar 15 '11 at 1:59
2  
Variables itself are never a security threat. It depends on how you use them. Having them in an array or under localized names makes no difference. Unless of course you use monster functions with lots of responsibilities and behaviour, where such $form_xyz certainly contribute to muddling the application flow. –  mario Mar 15 '11 at 2:01

Whilst, it is best to refer to them with $_POST['variablename'], it is possible to expand only the variables you are expecting.

$expected = array('name', 'telephone', /* etc */);

foreach ($_POST as $key => $value) {
    if (!in_array($key, $expected)) {
        continue;
    }

    ${$key} = $value;
}

Or, I prefer this:

foreach ($_POST as $key => $value) {
    switch ($key) {
        case 'name':
        case 'telephone':
        /* etc. */

            ${$key} = $value;
            break;
        default:
            break;
    }
}
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A safe way to extract variables into the local scope is not to. You're injecting variables into your local scope, which is a problem however you do it. Even if you limit the variables to only a few select ones that won't clash with other variable names in the scope now, if you start adding elements to your form you may be in trouble later.

Arrays are specifically for holding an unlimited amount of named values without crowding the variable namespace. Use them! You may have to type a little more, but that's par for the course.

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Thanks for the pro tip deceze. –  superUntitled Mar 15 '11 at 1:48

i like an approach where you let dynamic getters and setters in a class do all the work for you. here's how i would code it.

first

create a bass class to hold data:

class FormParameterHandler {
    protected $parameters;

    public function __construct($associative_array) {
        $this->parameters = array();

        foreach($associative_array as $key => $value) {
            $this->{$key} = $value;
        }
    }

    public function __get($key) {
        $value = null;

        if(method_exists($this, "get_$key")) {
            $value = $this->{"get_$key"}();
        } else {
            $value = $this->parameters[$key];
        }

        return $value;
    }

    public function __set($key, $value) {
        if(method_exists($this, "set_$key")) {
            $this->{"set_$key"}($value);
        } else {
            $this->parameters[$key] = $value;
        }
    }
}

next

create a specific class to use for some specific form where there is something special to validate. use your freedom as a programmer here to implement it any way you want to. and remember, since we're using reflection to look for setter methods, we can write specific setter methods for known problem areas, like e.g. to check for equal passwords in a "register user" form:

class RegisterFormParameterHandler extends FormParameterHandler {
    private $passwords_are_equal = null;

    public function __construct($register_form_parameters) {
        parent::__construct($register_form_parameters);
    }

    public function has_equal_passwords() {
        return $this->passwords_are_equal;
    }

    public function set_password($password) {
        $this->parameters['password'] = $password;
        $this->compare_passwords();
    }

    public function set_password_repeat($password_repeat) {
        $this->parameters['password_repeat'] = $password_repeat;
        $this->compare_passwords();
    }

    private function compare_passwords() {
        if(isset($this->parameters['password']) && isset($this->parameters['password_repeat'])) {
            $this->passwords_are_equal = ($this->parameters['password'] === $this->parameters['password_repeat']);
        }
    }
}

finally

use the derived class in a "register user" flow, to easily find out if the two entered passwords match:

$registerFormParameterHandler = new RegisterFormParameterHandler($_POST);

if($registerFormParameterHandler->has_equal_passwords()) {
    print "are equal";
    //register user
} else {
    print "are not equal";
}

you can test this by creating an html form that has one input field with the name "password", and another input field with the name "password_repeat".

to access any of the form data, use your form data object variable name, followed by the access operator "dash larger than" -> , followed by the name of the parameter. in the example above, if there was an input field named "user_name", it would be accessed through a call to

$registerFormParameterHandler->user_name

or, if you have defined the name of the field you want to get in some other variable, use reflection:

$registerFormParameterHandler->{$settings['form_data_user_name']}

have fun! :)

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+1 for effort. That's certainly overengineering in many cases. Getter/setter methods are unfavorable, but I like that you avoid CamelCase for method names, and it's a useable approach to place verifying business logic where it belongs. –  mario Mar 15 '11 at 3:34
    
thanks! :) delegating responsibilities to the most suitable place was my intention ^^ but why are getter/setter methods unfavorable? they play such an important role in this scenario. it's thanks to them that it's possible to have safe guarding methods for a select few properties, and basic unguarded behavior for the rest. also, white listing is possible, although i didn't implement it in this example. would white listing functionality make it better in your opinion? –  davogotland Mar 15 '11 at 11:50
    
I like the theory and general idea of your answer, but I feel that in regards to the question of "safety" when extracting array elements from the $_POST superglobal, you have not moved the ball forward. In the FormParameterHandler class, your constructor could be unsafe because it makes an assumption about the $_POST elements (that they are fit to be made properties). –  Anthony Rutledge Oct 16 at 16:26

The answer to your question depends on the computer, language, and security knowledge of the programmer. The opening sequence of processing $_POST is kind of like the opening move in a game of chess. Many use foreach loops without realizing that foreach will make a copy of the contents of $_POST the way you have it used (Programming PHP: Chpater 5, p.128-129). Wouldn't it be funny if you caused a buffer overflow simply by using foreach!

One commenter implied that everything should just be worked with inside of the $_POST superglobal. There are some merits to this.... However, forgetting cache memory for a moment, access to array values is slower than direct access to a variable. Since you have fifty (50) controls to validate (and do who knows what with), I might not want to take that array access performance hit more than 50 times (the original access hits). Moreover, if you are concerned about writing secure input validation routines, keeping your dirty laundry (non-validated input) separate from your clean (validated input) laundry is a good idea. That said, you may need a clean array anyway (hence the $_POST advocate's response), but at least you are reducing risk in the process by keeping the hopefully good separate from the potentially bad.

Is there a safe way to auto assign the keys in a posted array?

I might start like this:

Fucntion library for this example.


function all_controls_submitted($controls)
{
    $postKeys = array_keys($_POST);

    foreach($controlNames as $key)
    {
        if(! array_key_exists($key, $postKeys))
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

function all_controls_set($controls)
{
    foreach($controlNames as $key)
    {
        if(! isset($_POST[$key]))
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

if(is_array($_SERVER) && isset($_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'], $_SERVER[REQUEST_URI]) && $_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] === 'GET' && $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'] === '/contact.php')
{
    $newForm = true;
}
elseif (is_array($_SERVER) && isset($_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'], $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI']) && $_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] === 'POST' && $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'] === '/contact.php') 
{
    $newForm = false;

    $controlNames = array('firstName', 'lastName', 'e-mail', 'company', 'subject', 'message', 'captcha');

    define('NUM_CONTROLS_EXPECTED', count($controlNames)); //Seven (7)

    if(is_array($_POST) && count($_POST) === NUM_CONTROLS_EXPECTED && all_controls_submitted($controlNames) && all_controls_set($controlNames))
    {
        //Begin input validation
    }
}
else
{
    header('location: http://www.nsa.gov');
}

Notice that I prep things with the $controlNames array, therefore I do not have to ask $_POST for the keys. After all, I should know them! :-) The two user defined functions, all_controls_submitted() and all_controls_set() are two fundamental questions that should be asked before trying to use any values in post (I say, anyway). Admittedly, I do use $_POST in all_controls_submitted(), but only to obtain the names of the controls submitted, not the values.

$postKeys = array_keys($_POST);

However, who is to say that the control names themselves could not be poisonous and in need of input validation?!! Same goes for values in $_SERVER. See, a chess game.

Is there a safe way to auto assign the keys in a posted array? I cannot tell you for certain, but perhaps something like the of code above could help? You'd have the keys, at least.

Programming PHP: Chapter 5, p.125

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