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I know that there is an algorithm that permits, given a combination of number (no repetitions, no order), calculates the index of the lexicographic order.
It would be very useful for my application to speedup things...

For example:

combination(10, 5)  
1 - 1 2 3 4 5  
2 - 1 2 3 4 6  
3 - 1 2 3 4 7  
....  
251 - 5 7 8 9 10  
252 - 6 7 8 9 10  

I need that the algorithm returns the index of the given combination.
es: index( 2, 5, 7, 8, 10 ) --> index

EDIT: actually I'm using a java application that generates all combinations C(53, 5) and inserts them into a TreeMap. My idea is to create an array that contains all combinations (and related data) that I can index with this algorithm.
Everything is to speedup combination searching. However I tried some (not all) of your solutions and the algorithms that you proposed are slower that a get() from TreeMap.
If it helps: my needs are for a combination of 5 from 53 starting from 0 to 52.

Thank you again to all :-)

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I take it from your example that what needs to be indexed is a list m entries taken from a set of n known elements? Is a lookup table feasible? –  Janus Mar 15 '11 at 3:46
    
Yes, it's feasible. –  StefanoS Mar 17 '11 at 1:49

9 Answers 9

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is a snippet that will do the work.

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    const int n = 10;
    const int k = 5;

    int combination[k] = {2, 5, 7, 8, 10};

    int index = 0;
    int j = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i != k; ++i)
    {
        for (++j; j != combination[i]; ++j)
        {
            index += c(n - j, k - i - 1);
        }
    }

    std::cout << index + 1 << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

It assumes you have a function

int c(int n, int k);

that will return the number of combinations of choosing k elements out of n elements. The loop calculates the number of combinations preceding the given combination. By adding one at the end we get the actual index.

For the given combination there are c(9, 4) = 126 combinations containing 1 and hence preceding it in lexicographic order.

Of the combinations containing 2 as the smallest number there are

c(7, 3) = 35 combinations having 3 as the second smallest number

c(6, 3) = 20 combinations having 4 as the second smallest number

All of these are preceding the given combination.

Of the combinations containing 2 and 5 as the two smallest numbers there are

c(4, 2) = 6 combinations having 6 as the third smallest number.

All of these are preceding the given combination.

Etc.

If you put a print statement in the inner loop you will get the numbers 126, 35, 20, 6, 1. Hope that explains the code.

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I tried this solution, but it's slower than using a TreeMap. With TreeMap my application goes at 1,2 seconds/iteration, instead, with this algorithm, it goes at 16 seconds/iteration. –  StefanoS Mar 17 '11 at 2:02
    
The only thing in the inner loop is the call to c(n, k). I would be suspicious of the implementation of that function. –  user515430 Mar 17 '11 at 18:14
    
public static int getCombsNumber(int N, int K) { int combinationsNumber=1; for( int i=0; i<K; i++) combinationsNumber*=N-i; for( int i=2; i<=K; i++) combinationsNumber/=i; return combinationsNumber; } –  StefanoS Mar 18 '11 at 0:44
    
The best thing to do is cache the c(n,k) values. –  Thomas Andrews Jul 20 '14 at 19:37

Convert your number selections to a factorial base number. This number will be the index you want. Technically this calculates the lexicographical index of all permutations, but if you only give it combinations, the indexes will still be well ordered, just with some large gaps for all the permutations that come in between each combination.

Edit: pseudocode removed, it was incorrect, but the method above should work. Too tired to come up with correct pseudocode at the moment.

Edit 2: Here's an example. Say we were choosing a combination of 5 elements from a set of 10 elements, like in your example above. If the combination was 2 3 4 6 8, you would get the related factorial base number like so:

Take the unselected elements and count how many you have to pass by to get to the one you are selecting.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
2 -> 1
1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
3 -> 1
1 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
4 -> 1
1 5 6 7 8 9 10
6 -> 2
1 5 7 8 9 10
8 -> 3

So the index in factorial base is 1112300000

In decimal base, it's

1*9! + 1*8! + 1*7! + 2*6! + 3*5! = 410040

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an example would be fantastic :-) –  StefanoS Mar 17 '11 at 2:04
    
@StefanoS See my edit. –  Null Set Mar 18 '11 at 7:18
    
Now I understood, thank you a lot :-) –  StefanoS Mar 23 '11 at 19:04

zero-base,

# v: array of length k consisting of numbers between 0 and n-1 (ascending)
def index_of_combination(n,k,v):
    idx = 0
    for p in range(k-1):
        if p == 0: arrg = range(1,v[p]+1)
        else: arrg = range(v[p-1]+2, v[p]+1)
        for a in arrg:
            idx += combi[n-a, k-1-p]
    idx += v[k-1] - v[k-2] - 1
    return idx
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This is Algorithm 2.7 kSubsetLexRank on page 44 of Combinatorial Algorithms by Kreher and Stinson.

r = 0
t[0] = 0
for i from 1 to k
    if t[i - 1] + 1 <= t[i] - 1
        for j from t[i - 1] to t[i] - 1
            r = r + choose(n - j, k - i)
return r

The array t holds your values, for example [5 7 8 9 10]. The function choose(n, k) calculates the number "n choose k". The result value r will be the index, 251 for the example. Other inputs are n and k, for the example they would be 10 and 5.

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Null Set has the right approach. The index corresponds to the factorial-base number of the sequence. You build a factorial-base number just like any other base number, except that the base decreases for each digit.

Now, the value of each digit in the factorial-base number is the number of elements less than it that have not yet been used. So, for combination(10, 5):

(1 2 3 4 5) == 0*9!/5! + 0*8!/5! + 0*7!/5! + 0*6!/5! + 0*5!/5!
            == 0*3024 + 0*336 + 0*42 + 0*6 + 0*1
            == 0

(10 9 8 7 6) == 9*3024 + 8*336 + 7*42 + 6*6 + 5*1
             == 30239

It should be pretty easy to calculate the index incrementally.

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There's another way to do all this. You could generate all possible combinations and write them into a binary file where each comb is represented by it's index starting from zero. Then, when you need to find an index, and the combination is given, you apply a binary source on the file. Here's the function. It's written in VB.NET 2010 for my lotto program, it works with Israel lottery system so there's is a bonus (7-th) number, just ignore it.

Public Function Comb2Index( _
ByVal gAr() As Byte) As UInt32
 Dim mxPntr As UInt32 = WHL.AMT.WHL_SYS_00     '(16.273.488)
 Dim mdPntr As UInt32 = mxPntr \ 2
 Dim eqCntr As Byte
 Dim rdAr() As Byte

    modBinary.OpenFile(WHL.WHL_SYS_00, _
    FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read)

    Do
    modBinary.ReadBlock(mdPntr, rdAr)
RP: If eqCntr = 7 Then GoTo EX

        If gAr(eqCntr) = rdAr(eqCntr) Then
           eqCntr += 1
           GoTo RP

        ElseIf gAr(eqCntr) < rdAr(eqCntr) Then
            If eqCntr > 0 Then eqCntr = 0
               mxPntr = mdPntr
               mdPntr \= 2

        ElseIf gAr(eqCntr) > rdAr(eqCntr) Then
            If eqCntr > 0 Then eqCntr = 0
            mdPntr += (mxPntr - mdPntr) \ 2
        End If

    Loop Until eqCntr = 7

EX: modBinary.CloseFile()
    Return mdPntr

End Function

P.S. To generate 16 million combs takes 5 to 10 mins on Core 2 DUO. To find the index using binary search on file takes 397 milliseconds on SATA drive.

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Assuming the maximum setSize is not too large, you can simply generate a lookup table, where the inputs are encoded this way:

  int index(a,b,c,...)
  {
      int key = 0;
      key |= 1<<a;
      key |= 1<<b;
      key |= 1<<c;
      //repeat for all arguments
      return Lookup[key];
  } 

To generate the lookup table, look at this "banker's order" algorithm. Generate all the combinations, and also store the base index for each nItems. (For the example on p6, this would be [0,1,5,11,15]). Note that by you storing the answers in the opposite order from the example (LSBs set first) you will only need one table, sized for the largest possible set.

Populate the lookup table by walking through the combinations doing Lookup[combination[i]]=i-baseIdx[nItems]

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EDIT: Never mind. This is completely wrong.


Let your combination be (a1, a2, ..., ak-1, ak) where a1 < a2 < ... < ak. Let choose(a,b) = a!/(b!*(a-b)!) if a >= b and 0 otherwise. Then, the index you are looking for is

choose(ak-1, k) + choose(ak-1-1, k-1) + choose(ak-2-1, k-2) + ... + choose (a2-1, 2) + choose (a1-1, 1) + 1

The first term counts the number of k-element combinations such that the largest element is less than ak. The second term counts the number of (k-1)-element combinations such that the largest element is less than ak-1. And, so on.

Notice that the size of the universe of elements to be chosen from (10 in your example) does not play a role in the computation of the index. Can you see why?

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This does not give the lexicographic ordering. For example, combination(5,3) has (1,2,5) in position 3, but this formula gives 5. –  PengOne Mar 16 '11 at 2:19
    
You're right. This is completely wrong. I don't know what I was thinking. –  mhum Mar 16 '11 at 4:00
    
too easy to be true... –  StefanoS Mar 16 '11 at 23:16

If you have a set of positive integers 0<=x_1 < x_2< ... < x_k , then you could use something called the squashed order:

I = sum(j=1..k) Choose(x_j,j)

The beauty of the squashed order is that it works independent of the largest value in the parent set.

The squashed order is not the order you are looking for, but it is related.

To use the squashed order to get the lexicographic order in the set of k-subsets of {1,...,n) is by taking

1 <= x1 < ... < x_k <=n

compute

 0 <= n-x_k < n-x_(k-1) ... < n-x_1

Then compute the squashed order index of (n-x_k,...,n-k_1)

Then subtract the squashed order index from Choose(n,k) to get your result, which is the lexicographic index.

If you have relatively small values of n and k, you can cache all the values Choose(a,b) with a

See Anderson, Combinatorics on Finite Sets, pp 112-119

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