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Suppose there is some text from a file:

(bookmarks
("Chapter 1 Introduction 1" "#1"
("1.1 Problem Statement and Basic Definitions 2" "#2")
("1.2 Illustrative Examples 4" "#4")
("1.3 Guidelines for Model Construction 26" "#26")
("Exercises 30" "#30")
("Notes and References 34" "#34"))
)

How can I add 11 to the last number in each line if there is one, ie

(bookmarks
("Chapter 1 Introduction 1" "#12"
("1.1 Problem Statement and Basic Definitions 2" "#13")
("1.2 Illustrative Examples 4" "#15")
("1.3 Guidelines for Model Construction 26" "#37")
("Exercises 30" "#41")
("Notes and References 34" "#45"))
)

by using sed, awk, python, perl, regex ....

Thanks and regards!

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8 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
awk -F'#' 'NF>1{split($2,a,"[0-9]+");print $1 FS $2+11 a[2];next}1' infile

Proof of Concept

$ awk -F'#' 'NF>1{split($2,a,"[0-9]+");print $1 FS $2+11 a[2];next}1' infile
(bookmarks
("Chapter 1 Introduction 1" "#12"
("1.1 Problem Statement and Basic Definitions 2" "#13")
("1.2 Illustrative Examples 4" "#15")
("1.3 Guidelines for Model Construction 26" "#37")
("Exercises 30" "#41")
("Notes and References 34" "#45"))
)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! There is a problem, some lines in output miss the right half of parenthesis. –  Tim Mar 15 '11 at 12:13
    
@Tim my bad, I've updated my answer to accommodate your parenthesis. It also turned out a bit simpler than my previous answer –  SiegeX Mar 15 '11 at 20:47
    
SiegeX: Thanks! Some questions (1) why does "$2+11" works, since $2 is not completely numbers? (2) what is the purpose of "next"? will it work the same without "next"? (3) what does the "1" after "next}" mean? Will it work the same without the "1"? –  Tim Nov 19 '11 at 22:23
    
@Tim: (1) awk knows you can only do math on numbers, so it does the best it can and ignores the rest (2) 'next' tells awk to immediately take in the next input and start the processing over, potentially skipping over further processing that would have happened otherwise (3) the '1' outside of the brace is a shortcut to tell awk to unconditionally print $0. (4) 'next' and '1' work in concert. Anything that doesn't match the pattern (NF>1) is unconditionally printed thanks to '1'. Any line that does match is altered then explicitly printed via 'print'. 'next' prevents double printing. –  SiegeX Nov 20 '11 at 10:20
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use strict;
use warnings;
while(my $line = <DATA>){
  $line =~ s/#(\d+)/'#'.($1 + 11)/e;
}
__DATA__
(bookmarks
("Chapter 1 Introduction 1" "#1"
("1.1 Problem Statement and Basic Definitions 2" "#2")
("1.2 Illustrative Examples 4" "#4")
("1.3 Guidelines for Model Construction 26" "#26")
("Exercises 30" "#30")
("Notes and References 34" "#34"))
)

Output:

(bookmarks
("Chapter 1 Introduction 1" "#12"
("1.1 Problem Statement and Basic Definitions 2" "#13")
("1.2 Illustrative Examples 4" "#15")
("1.3 Guidelines for Model Construction 26" "#37")
("Exercises 30" "#41")
("Notes and References 34" "#45"))
)
share|improve this answer
    
You removed the # symbol –  SiegeX Mar 15 '11 at 4:52
    
@SiegeX: yes, you are right, now i have fixed it, thanks for pointing out the issue. –  Nikhil Jain Mar 15 '11 at 5:02
    
Thanks! I would like to input from a file and output to another file, so I try "perl -pe 's/#(\d+)/'#'.($1 + 11)/e' <input.txt >output.txt" in my terminal, however it now leave the last number empty, for example, in the second line, "("Chapter 1 Introduction 1" "#12"" becomes "("Chapter 1 Introduction 1" """. –  Tim Mar 15 '11 at 12:20
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In Python, try:

import re
m = re.search(r'(?<=#)([0-9]+)',txt)

to find the next number. Then set:

txt = txt[:m.start()] + str(int(m.group())+11) + txt[m.end():]

Repeat that (e.g. in a while-loop) as long as search doesnt find any further matches.

Note: The regExp (?<=#)([0-9]+) matches any sequence of digits which follow the #-character. start() yields the start-position of the next match; end() yields the end-Position and group() yields the actual match. The expression str(int(m.group()) +11) converts the matched number to an int-value, adds 11 and re-converts in to a string.

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If you can use Ruby(1.9+)

$ ruby -ne 'puts $_=/#/?$_.gsub(/(.*#)(\d+)(.*)/){"#{$1}"+($2.to_i+11).to_s+"#{$3}"}:$_' file
(bookmarks
("Chapter 1 Introduction 1" "#12"
("1.1 Problem Statement and Basic Definitions 2" "#13")
("1.2 Illustrative Examples 4" "#15")
("1.3 Guidelines for Model Construction 26" "#37")
("Exercises 30" "#41")
("Notes and References 34" "#45"))
)
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In Python

dh = '''"Chapter 1 Introduction 1" "#1"
"1.1 Problem Statement and Basic Definitions 2" "#2"
"1.2 Illustrative Examples 4" "#4"
"1.3 Guidelines for Model Construction 26" "#26"
"Exercises 30" "#30"
"Notes and References 34" "#34"'''

pat = re.compile('^(".+?(\d+)" *"#)\\2" *$',re.M)

def zoo(mat):
    return '%s%s"' % (mat.group(1),str(int(mat.group(2))+11))

print dh
print
print pat.sub(zoo,dh)

result

"Chapter 1 Introduction 1" "#1"
"1.1 Problem Statement and Basic Definitions 2" "#2"
"1.2 Illustrative Examples 4" "#4"
"1.3 Guidelines for Model Construction 26" "#26"
"Exercises 30" "#30"
"Notes and References 34" "#34"

"Chapter 1 Introduction 1" "#12"
"1.1 Problem Statement and Basic Definitions 2" "#13"
"1.2 Illustrative Examples 4" "#15"
"1.3 Guidelines for Model Construction 26" "#37"
"Exercises 30" "#41"
"Notes and References 34" "#45"

.

But beginning from the preceding string as exposed in your other message:

eh = '''Chapter 3 Convex Functions 97 
3.1 Definitions 98  
3.2 Basic Properties 103'''

pat = re.compile('^(.+?(\d+)) *$',re.M)

def zaa(mat):
    return '"%s" "%s"' % (mat.group(1),str(int(mat.group(2))+11))

print eh
print
print pat.sub(zaa,eh)

result

Chapter 3 Convex Functions 97 
3.1 Definitions 98  
3.2 Basic Properties 103

"Chapter 3 Convex Functions 97" "108"
"3.1 Definitions 98" "109"
"3.2 Basic Properties 103" "114"

Is all that a homework ?

.

EDIT :

I corrected the first above code

dh = '''(bookmarks
("Chapter 1 Introduction 1" "#1")
("1.1 Problem Statement and Basic Definitions 2" "#2")
("1.2 Illustrative Examples 4" "#4")
("1.3 Guidelines for Model Construction 26" "#26")
("Exercises 30" "#30")
("Notes and References 34" "#34"))
)'''

pat = re.compile('^(\(".+?(\d+)" *"#)\\2" *(\)\)?)$',re.M)

def zoo(mat):
    return '%s%s"%s' % (mat.group(1),str(int(mat.group(2))+11),mat.group(3))

print dh
print
print pat.sub(zoo,dh)

result

(bookmarks
("Chapter 1 Introduction 1" "#1")
("1.1 Problem Statement and Basic Definitions 2" "#2")
("1.2 Illustrative Examples 4" "#4")
("1.3 Guidelines for Model Construction 26" "#26")
("Exercises 30" "#30")
("Notes and References 34" "#34"))
)

(bookmarks
("Chapter 1 Introduction 1" "#12")
("1.1 Problem Statement and Basic Definitions 2" "#13")
("1.2 Illustrative Examples 4" "#15")
("1.3 Guidelines for Model Construction 26" "#37")
("Exercises 30" "#41")
("Notes and References 34" "#45"))
)
share|improve this answer
    
none of these match the OP's desired output –  SiegeX Mar 15 '11 at 7:04
    
@Siegex OK, I corrected the input text, I put the parentheses , I hadn't believed the text was really with them. Is it right, now ? –  eyquem Mar 15 '11 at 8:47
    
@SiegeX: Thanks! (1) Not a homework. No homework is like that. I am learning to create bookmark for djvu files, but manually doing it is tedious and error-prone. (2)I would like to input from a file and output to another. How to do that? –  Tim Mar 15 '11 at 12:23
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From my answer to your earlier question:

awk '{n = $NF + 11; print "(\"" $0 "\" \"#" n "\")"}' inputfile

or

awk 'BEGIN {q="\x22"} {n = $NF + 11; print "(" q $0 q " " q "#" n q ")"}' inputfile

This works on the data as you presented in the previous question. I can't determine how you're getting from that to the example you posted in this question since there's a difference in the way the parentheses are nested. You also don't say whether the (bookmarks ) wrapper already exists in the original input or if some code we don't see is adding it while other things are being added.

What you're doing is starting to look a little bit like XML. Perhaps you should use the real thing and use proper tools to manipulate it.

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Thanks! (1) I am learning to create bookmark for djvu files from this link ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1522901#3 . (2) The previous post and the current one are just two of my steps to make the bookmark text files. I mannually add "bookmarks" as the first line between the two steps. If there is a single script to accomplish all the steps, that will be fantastic! (3) I don't know about XML and don't know if djvu is related to XML. Is it? If yes, what are "the real thing and use proper tools to manipulate it"? –  Tim Mar 15 '11 at 16:44
    
@Tim: You can use one of the commands from this answer in the step before you add the (bookmarks ) around it. I don't know the first thing about djvu or djvused, but a quick google turns up djvuxml. XML files can be easily manipulated using the appropriate Python or Perl module or shell utilities such as xmlstarlet. –  Dennis Williamson Mar 15 '11 at 16:57
    
@DennisWilliamson What is that newfangled XML stuff that you speak of? These are good ol' sexps! –  Gilles Jul 20 '11 at 16:50
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Python:

import re
file_name="bin/SO/bookmarks.txt"

print "unmodified file:"
with open(file_name) as f:
    for line in f:
        print line.rstrip()

print   

print "modified file:"
i=11
with open(file_name) as f:
    for line in f:
        m=re.match(r'(^.*"#)(\d+)(.*$)',line)
        if m:
            new_line=m.group(1)+str(int(m.group(2))+i)+m.group(3)
            print new_line
        else:
            print line.rstrip()

Output:

unmodified file:
(bookmarks
("Chapter 1 Introduction 1" "#1"
("1.1 Problem Statement and Basic Definitions 2" "#2")
("1.2 Illustrative Examples 4" "#4")
("1.3 Guidelines for Model Construction 26" "#26")
("Exercises 30" "#30")
("Notes and References 34" "#34"))
)

modified file:
(bookmarks
("Chapter 1 Introduction 1" "#12"
("1.1 Problem Statement and Basic Definitions 2" "#13")
("1.2 Illustrative Examples 4" "#15")
("1.3 Guidelines for Model Construction 26" "#37")
("Exercises 30" "#41")
("Notes and References 34" "#45"))
)
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This syntax is s-expressions (sexps for short), easiest to manipulate in Lisp and related languages such as Scheme. Easiest for complex tasks, that is; if you can assume that your input is sufficiently tame (e.g. no "# inside chapter titles, newlines where you illustrate them, etc.), then for this task a text processing tool (as shown by other answers) is preferable.

In Lisp or Scheme, reading and writing the data as structured data is as simple as (read) and (write data). Other things aren't so easy, for example there's no standard way to read the command line arguments in Lisp or Scheme.

Here's a Lisp program that does the desired transformation. It treats the data as structured data, so you don't have to worry about the presentation. The first line, to obtain the first command line argument, is for CLisp; the rest is portable Common Lisp.

(setq delta (parse-integer (car ext:*args*)))
(defun shift-page (page)
  (format nil "#~D" (+ delta (parse-integer page :start 1))))
(defun shift-pages (entry)
  (let ((title (car entry))
        (page (cadr entry))
        (subentries (cddr entry)))
    (cons title (cons (shift-page page) (mapcar #'shift-pages subentries)))))
(let ((toc (read)))
  (write (cons 'bookmarks (mapcar #'shift-pages (cdr toc)))))
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