Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
 > CREATE TABLE student(
-> student_id INT(2) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
-> first_name VARCHAR(10),
-> last_name VARCHAR(10)
-> );

 > CREATE TABLE course(
-> course_id CHAR(5) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
-> course_name VARCHAR(50),
-> student_id INT(2) NOT NULL,
-> CONSTRAINT student_student_id_fk
-> FOREIGN KEY (student_id)
-> REFERENCES student(student_id)
-> );

Thats how i created two tables namely student and course. Then i entered data in the student table. But when i enter some invalid data in the course table, it doesn't gives me any error. For example: VALUES('A1','SUB 1',34); gets the entry in the course table even if there is no primary key '34' in the student table.

Also, i can delete records in the student table, even if there is referential integrity. So, how can enforce the constraints?

share|improve this question
    
I'm happy to help you, but it would be nice once in a while for you to click on the tick next to answers when they help you to acknowledge the help. –  RichardTheKiwi Mar 15 '11 at 17:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The easiest way to do this is to change your storage engine to InnoDB which supports the constraints.

For old MyISAM tables, you will have to use triggers on BOTH sides to enforce an FK relationship

Some links for self-help

Create your tables like this

 > CREATE TABLE student(
-> student_id INT(2) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
-> first_name VARCHAR(10),
-> last_name VARCHAR(10)
-> ) ENGINE = INNODB;

 > CREATE TABLE course(
-> course_id CHAR(5) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
-> course_name VARCHAR(50),
-> student_id INT(2) NOT NULL,
-> CONSTRAINT student_student_id_fk
-> FOREIGN KEY (student_id)
-> REFERENCES student(student_id)
-> ) ENGINE = INNODB;
share|improve this answer
    
I really cannot understand the 'storage engine to InnoDB', Sorry, i am a beginner. –  Gopal Mar 15 '11 at 5:36
    
@Gopal - MySQL comes with a variety of storage engines that actually manage the data. You can specify a different engine with each table. If you don't specify an engine, it will use the default engine, which is MyISAM. It is fast for many things (which is why it is the default), but it does not support foreign key constraints like you want. The InnoDB engine does. –  Ted Hopp Mar 15 '11 at 5:44
    
When i use the code SHOW CREATE TABLE course, I get this: course | CREATE TABLE course ( course_id char(5) NOT NULL, course_name varchar(50) DEFAULT NULL, student_id int(2) NOT NULL, PRIMARY KEY (course_id), KEY student_student_id_fk (student_id) ) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 | –  Gopal Mar 15 '11 at 5:48
    
So, yes, you are right, it uses MyISAM storage engine by default. –  Gopal Mar 15 '11 at 5:52

For someone having the same problem, if you already created your table using MyISAM, you can change it to InnoDB using.

ALTER TABLE table_name ENGINE=InnoDB;

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.