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I've been starting to play around with node.js recently and I've come across a situation where I need a little guidance around the prescriptive node.js way of accomplishing a task. In this particular case I need to create a bunch of directories and, when all of the directories have been created I need to perform some final operation. The order in which the directories are created does not matter, I just need to perform a final operation after the last one is.

The easiest way the accomplish this would be to fall back to the old synchronous habits. That is, just call fs.mkdirSync for each of the directories and perform the operation at the end. For example:

fs.mkdirSync('a', 0755);
fs.mkdirSync('a/b', 0755);
fs.mkdirSync('a/b/c', 0755);
performFinalOperation();

While this would work, it doesn't feel like it's the node.js way of doing it. Obviously, the program would block while it waits for the OS to create the directory and return. On a heavily loaded system with a file system that's mounted remotely each of the mkdirSync calls could take a very long time. So clearly, this isn't the best approach.

One of node.js' main selling points is the fact that it's asynchronous. So the calls to fs.mkdir could be chained through the callbacks:

fs.mkdir('a', 0755, function(e) {
    if (!e) {
        fs.mkdir('a/b', 0755, function(e) {
            if (!e) {
                fs.mkdir('a/b/c', 0755, function(e) {
                    if (!e) {
                        performFinalOperation();
                    }
                });
            }
        });
    }
});

Again, this approach I'm sure works, but it leads to really deep nesting and code duplication. It does have the benefit of not blocking while the directories are created, but at what cost?

Another approach would be to get really fancy in an effort to avoid the code duplication and nesting:

(function (directories) {
    if (directories.length === 0) {
        performFinalOperation();
    } else {
        var tail = arguments.callee;
        fs.mkdir(directories.shift(), 0755, function(e) {
            tail(directories);
        });
    }
})(['a', 'a/b', 'a/b/c']);

This approach makes use of all sorts of crazy stuff: anonymous self calling functions and the magical arguments.callee. But worst of all, it isn't obvious what the code is doing at first glance.

So, while the concrete question is around creating directories I'm more interested in the approach that a seasoned node.js veteran would take when this sort of situation arises. I'm specifically not interested in what libraries are around to make this easier.

share|improve this question
    
I'd use Deferreds or create a helper function that calls itself recursively as long as there are remaining folders to be created. –  Tower May 11 '11 at 17:15
    
Hey, if you were looking for an utility that does that for you, you'd use async. It takes the pain of dealing with the asynchronous model. It's better to separate the tasks and not reinvent the wheel. IMHO :) –  jmendeth Oct 14 '12 at 10:07

8 Answers 8

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Oh, hey Bryan :)

I'm specifically not interested in what libraries are around to make this easier.

The seasoned Node veteran has written at least one of their own control flow libs. We just copied Twisted's Deferred classes since they already did the hard work and research into async programming. This inverts the standard callback-as-argument pattern and I like the resulting code, but if you want to nest a bunch of callbacks you can still do that with Deferred and end up with just as much of a mess.

With the restriction of not using libraries people generally do exactly what you wrote. There really isn't any other choice. Without language changes such as generators the best we can do is use libraries. If you don't want to use an existing one you will end up rolling your own or just writing a lot of boilerplate.

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1  
+1 one of the best things node has going for it is it's module ecosystem. The core is kept reasonably small (not solving every problem) so userland modules can solve these kinds of problems. This keeps node lightweight, agile and constantly evolving. –  timoxley Jan 22 '12 at 1:06

Your second solution can be greatly simplified, and include errors like this:

var mkdirs = function(dirs, mode, cb){
  (function next(e) {
    (!e && dirs.length) ? fs.mkdir(dirs.shift(), mode, next) : cb(e);
  })(null);
};
share|improve this answer
    
This took me a while to understand because I never use the ?: operator with side effects like that. Maybe a traditional if-based solution would be clearer? –  strager Mar 16 '11 at 2:16
    
+1, but would be nice if you can have a little more explanation of what's happening here ? –  RobertPitt Mar 16 '11 at 10:30
1  
To me this looks more like code-golfing than actually simplifying anything. –  Oscar Kilhed Mar 16 '11 at 15:53
1  
+1 Actually, I think this is much more cleaner/clearer and expresses the intent quite beautifully!! The key is to notice that the named function "next" is being called recursively and that the closure variable dirs is being manipulated as a state variable. On the absolute last call (when dirs is empty - assuming e is always null), cb is invoked. Except for the first call to next (which is explicit with null passed to it), all other calls (to next) will be made by fs.mkdir. –  dhruvbird Mar 16 '11 at 16:32

npm install mkdirp

var mkdirp = require('mkdirp').mkdirp;

mkdirp('/tmp/foo/bar/baz', 0755, function (err) {
    if (err) console.error(err)
    else console.log('pow!')
});
share|improve this answer
    
Haha that's an option too :P... –  Alfred Mar 16 '11 at 10:08
    
Hi substack. mkdirp is great, but I think the OP is asking for a more general solution (Prescriptive JS). The directories are just an example of such a case. –  jmendeth Oct 14 '12 at 12:25

I believe the way to do this is with a counter. Start with the number of directories to make, then decrement it when each operation completes. Also test for zero at this point and perform final operation.

See http://howtonode.org/control-flow-part-iii

share|improve this answer
    
This is ideal for tasks which can run in parallel, it's not the best solution when tasks should be run sequentially (there is no need for a counter at all here). –  Adrien Mar 15 '11 at 19:49

Hm, this is speculation, and I hardly know any Javascript, but how about something with an end result like this?

Asynchronously
  .Do(function(callback) { 
    fs.mkdir('a', 0755, callback);
  })
  .Then(function(result, callback) { 
    if(!result)
      fs.mkdir('a/b', 0755, callback); 
  })
  .Then(function(result, callback) {
    if(!result)
      fs.mkdir('a/b/c', 0755, callback);
  })
  .Then(function(result, callback) {
    if(!result)
      performFinalOperation();
  });
share|improve this answer

I would recommend looking into Step. It makes the transition from synchronous to asynchronous much easier.

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  • The seasoned veterans wrote libraries to simplify this. You don't want to hear about this so I am not going to much into the details but I really like async.js.
  • Also this post(video) from Yahoo! is really interesting to avoid writting spaghetti-code
share|improve this answer

How about this approach. I think it is quite clear, it handles errors, and it doesn't make use of arguments.callee which is more magic than I'm generally comfortable with.

var fs = require('fs');

function mkdirs(dirs, cb, err) {
    if (err) {
        return cb(err);
    }

    if (dirs.length === 0) {
        return cb();
    }

    var dir = dirs.shift();
    fs.mkdir(dir, mkdirs.bind(this, dirs, cb));
}

// Test it.
mkdirs(['a', 'a/b', 'a/b/c'], function (e) {
    if (e) {
        return console.log("An error:", e);
    }

    console.log("No error.");
});
share|improve this answer

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