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Hi i have this command pattern example from the web , but there is something i dont understand is the typedef thing , what is the * Action represns here i dont even have this method defined ... here is the code example :

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

class Number
{
  public:
    void dubble(int &value)
    {
        value *= 2;
    }
};

class Command
{
  public:
    virtual void execute(int &) = 0;
};

class SimpleCommand: public Command
{
    typedef void(Number:: *Action)(int &);
    Number *receiver;
    Action action;
  public:
    SimpleCommand(Number *rec, Action act)
    {
        receiver = rec;
        action = act;
    }
     /*virtual*/void execute(int &num)
    {
        (receiver-> *action)(num);
    }
};

class MacroCommand: public Command
{
    vector < Command * > list;
  public:
    void add(Command *cmd)
    {
        list.push_back(cmd);
    }
     /*virtual*/void execute(int &num)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < list.size(); i++)
          list[i]->execute(num);
    }
};

int main()
{
  Number object;
  Command *commands[3];
  commands[0] = &SimpleCommand(&object, &Number::dubble);

  MacroCommand two;
  two.add(commands[0]);
  two.add(commands[0]);
  commands[1] = &two;

  MacroCommand four;
  four.add(&two);
  four.add(&two);
  commands[2] = &four;

  int num, index;
  while (true)
  {
    cout << "Enter number selection (0=2x 1=4x 2=16x): ";
    cin >> num >> index;
    commands[index]->execute(num);
    cout << "   " << num << '\n';
  }
}
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1  
possible duplicate of What does "typedef void (*Something)()" mean –  Suma Mar 15 '11 at 7:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The typedef defines a pointer to a function which is a method of class Number and accepts an int.

Note that when you provide an actual function, it's dubble, and it is implemented. But you can add more, and when you do - you would only change the Number class, not the Command and others.

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1  
See newty.de/fpt/fpt.html for more info re: function pointers –  levis501 Mar 15 '11 at 7:23
    
but why i need the typedef here ? can't i just declare the pointer to function ? also i dont understand in the example what is the Action class ? i didn't define any Action class –  user63898 Mar 15 '11 at 7:33
    
@user63898: I downvoted your question, because you don't read all the answers before asking further question! –  Nawaz Mar 15 '11 at 8:15
    
Many people find the pointer to member syntax somewhat difficult to read; the typedef simplifies it. –  James Kanze Mar 15 '11 at 9:02
 typedef void(Number:: *Action)(int &);

This typedef defines a type with name Action. The type Action is a member-function-pointer to a member function of class Number whose parameter type is int& and return type is void.

Since Action is the name of the type, that is why you see this name in constructor of SimpleCommand.

SimpleCommand(Number *rec, Action act)
{               //see this ^^^^^^ - being used as type!
    receiver = rec;
    action = act;
}
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using http://www.cdecl.org (a very useful site) with void(Number:: *Action)(int &) as input (note that it does not handle typedefs) gives this:

declare Action as pointer to member of class Number function (reference to int) returning void Warning: Unsupported in C -- 'pointer to member of class' Warning: Unsupported in C -- 'reference'

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