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Assuming I have an SQL table with this schema:

CREATE TABLE(
foo INTEGER,
bar INTEGER,
baz INTEGER DEFAULT 0
);

which contains data

foo|bar|baz
-----------
1  |1  |2
2  |3  |4

and I am interested in values 1,2 for foo and 1,2,3 for bar. Is there an SQL request which would return "missing" values along with the existing ones:

foo|bar|baz
-----------
1  |1  |2
1  |2  |0
1  |3  |0
2  |1  |0
2  |2  |0
2  |3  |4

? I suspect there isn't, but perhaps I just don't know it?

UPDATE: 1) using SQLite 3; 2) the missing values are given by the DEFAULT clause; 3) the second table shows the expected result.

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Which DBMS are you using? –  a_horse_with_no_name Mar 15 '11 at 9:47
    
what is the logic to determine the "missing" values? –  Ronnis Mar 15 '11 at 9:48
    
What exactly do you mean by 'missing values'? –  gnuchu Mar 15 '11 at 9:49
    
Is the second table an example of the output you want or just an example table? –  Belinda Mar 15 '11 at 9:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Assuming you named your table Data, following would get you the results you've posted.

  • the WITH statement creates a temporary in memory table containing all Bar's from 1 to the Maximum present in your actual table.
  • the CROSS APPLY returns a row for every bar, existing in your table or not.
  • the CASE statement selects an existing baz if present, 0 if not.

SQL Statement

WITH q AS (
  SELECT  [bar] = 1
          , [MaxBar] = MAX(bar)
  FROM    Data
  UNION ALL 
  SELECT  q.bar + 1
          , q.MaxBar
  FROM    q
  WHERE   q.bar + 1 <= q.MaxBar
)  
SELECT  Data.foo
        , q.bar
        , CASE WHEN q.bar = Data.bar THEN Data.baz ELSE 0 END
FROM    q
        CROSS APPLY Data
ORDER BY
        Data.foo
        , q.bar

Test script

WITH Data AS (
  SELECT [foo] = 1, [bar] = 1, [baz] = 2
  UNION ALL SELECT 2, 3, 4
), q AS (
  SELECT  [bar] = MIN(bar)
          , [MaxBar] = MAX(bar)
  FROM    Data
  UNION ALL 
  SELECT  q.bar + 1
          , q.MaxBar
  FROM    q
  WHERE   q.bar + 1 <= q.MaxBar
)  
SELECT  Data.foo
        , q.bar
        , CASE WHEN q.bar = Data.bar THEN Data.baz ELSE 0 END
FROM    q
        CROSS APPLY Data
ORDER BY
        Data.foo
        , q.bar
share|improve this answer
    
@Alexey, I have slightly changed the statement to start from 1 io MIN(bar) just in case MIN(bar) would be different to 1. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Mar 15 '11 at 10:49

create following tables

table_foo

foo|
-----------
1  |
2  |

table_bar

bar|
-----------
1  |
2  |
3  |

After that, this query should do the trick:

select * from  table
UNION
(
    select 
        table_foo.foo,
        table_bar.bar,
        0 
    from
        table,
        table_foo, 
        table_bar
    where 
        table.foo != table_foo.foo and
        table.bar != table_bar.bar
)
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@Shamit THis won't work. 'Baz' will always return 0 –  Curt Mar 15 '11 at 10:01
    
@Curt, That should be expected since in the question Baz is Zero for all rows except the rows that were already present. –  Shamit Verma Mar 15 '11 at 10:04
    
@Shamit In the initial question, when foo=1 & bar=1, baz=2. I don't think this is true with your example –  Curt Mar 15 '11 at 10:19
    
This seems simplest and most portable. Would be nice to avoid temporary tables, but I can certainly live with them. –  Alexey Romanov Mar 15 '11 at 10:20
    
@Curt Oops, I see what you mean. –  Alexey Romanov Mar 15 '11 at 10:33

Assuming that your table is called MyTab, this sql will produce the second table of data (I'm assuming MSSQL):

select 
    f.foo,
    b.bar,
    baz = coalesce(m.baz,0)
from 
    (select foo = 1 union select foo = 2) f
    cross join (select bar = 1 union select bar = 2 union select bar = 3) b
    left join mytab m on f.foo = m.foo and b.bar = m.bar
share|improve this answer
    
I assume Alexey needs a solution that works with whatever rows are present in the table. This solution works but it would need adjusting every time rows are changed or added. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Mar 15 '11 at 10:13
    
@Lieven - Just working to the spec! - "I am interested in values 1,2 for foo and 1,2,3 for bar". I like your solution as a generalized case, but if he's only ever going to have these possible values then a simpler solution is best. –  Jon Egerton Mar 15 '11 at 10:25
    
following your logic, a select 1, 1, 2 union all select 1, 2, 0 union all... would even be simpler <g>. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Mar 15 '11 at 10:51
declare @foovalues table (foo int) -- values 1,2 for foo
insert into @foovalues values (1) 
insert into @foovalues values (2)

declare @barvalues table (bar int) -- values 1,2,3 for bar
insert into @barvalues values (1) 
insert into @barvalues values (2)
insert into @barvalues values (3)

declare @table table (foo int, bar int, baz int) -- your data
insert into @table values (1,1,2)
insert into @table values (2,3,4)

select x.foo, x.bar, isnull(baz, 0) as baz
from (select f.foo, b.bar from @foovalues f, @barvalues b) as x
left outer join @table t on t.foo = x.foo and t.bar = x.bar
order by x.foo, x.bar
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