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Is there a more appropriate/efficient data structure for a Transaction Queue than using a List. I've tried using Queues and Stacks but neither fits the bill correctly.

I've outlined my problem in detail below with examples showing why I've ended up with a List for the time being. Any suggestions of alternative data structures (preferably but not limited to those with an implementation in the .Net BCL) are appreciated.

Problem

Maintain a transaction queue of Insert()/Delete() operations which will be later persisted to arbitrary backing storage when the user calls a Commit() method or discarded when they call the Rollback() method.

Operations must be enacted on the in-memory state of the object affected since subsequent operations may rely on the state of the object created by previous operations.

Example 1

I have an object obj which starts as an empty collection. The user inserts an item i and then delete the item i.

They then call Rollback(), given the following data structures for the queue the following happens in the rollback:

  • Queue - obj.Delete(i), obj.Insert(i) -> incorrect since obj should remain empty after the rollback
  • Stack - obj.Insert(i), obj.Delete(i) -> correct since obj remains empty
  • List (Reverse Traversal) - obj.Insert(i), obj.Delete(i) -> correct since obj remains empty

If they call Commit() instead then the following happens:

  • Queue - obj.Insert(i), obj.Delete(i) -> correct since obj remains empty
  • Stack - obj.Delete(i), obj.Insert(i) -> incorrect since obj is not empty
  • List (Forward Traversal) - obj.Insert(i), obj.Delete(i) -> correct since obj remains empty

So for this example Queue works for Commit() but not Rollback() and a Stack shows the inverse behaviour but both are incorrect. Only List shows correct behaviour though note that for commit we traverse the list in a forward direction while for a rollback we traverse the list in a reverse direction.

Example 2

Now consider having again an object obj which this time starts with the single item i contained in itself.

This time the sequence of operations is a Delete of i followed by an Insert of i.

If they call Rollback() the following happens:

  • Queue - obj.Insert(i), obj.Delete(i) -> incorrect since obj ends up as empty
  • Stack - obj.Delete(i), obj.Insert(i) -> correct since obj contains the single item i still
  • List (Reverse Traversal) - obj.Delete(i), obj.Insert(i) -> correct since obj contains the single item i still

If they instead called Commit() the following happens:

  • Queue - obj.Delete(i), obj.Insert(i) -> correct since obj contains the single item i still
  • Stack - obj.Insert(i), obj.Delete(i) -> incorrect since obj ends up as empty
  • List (Forward Traversal) - obj.Delete(i), obj.Insert(i) -> correct since obj contains the single item i still

As with the previous example only using List is correct in both cases but we have to traverse it in different directions depending on whether we are committing or rolling back.

Bottom Line

While using a List is not inefficient in itself I just wondered whether there was a more appropriate data structure which is a better fit for my problem?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Technically you could use a LinkedList<T>. It's like a Queue + Stack: you can add and remove from head and from tail, and in both cases it's O(1) (but it's normally slower than a List, for reasons connected to memory locality and the need to allocate memory for each adding of an element)

(Please, don't kill me because I said a LinkedList<T> is like Queue + Stack... I know the difference... I meant only that it can be used in both ways at the same time)

I'll add that, if you consider Rollback an "exception" (something rare), then you can use a Queue and, when you have a Rollback, Reverse the output of the Queue using LINQ. Being an "exception", it can be slower (and you don't even need LINQ... You can do a ToArray() and traverse the array in reverse order)

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