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Is there any performance difference (in C++) between the two styles of writing if-else, as shown below (logically equivalent code) for the likely1 == likely2 == true path (likely1 and likely2 are meant here as placeholders for some more elaborate conditions)?

// Case (1):
if (likely1) {
  Foo();
  if (likely2) {
    Bar();
  } else {
    Alarm(2);
  }
} else {
  Alarm(1);
}

vs.

// Case (2):
if (!likely1) {
  Alarm(1);
  return;
}
Foo();
if (!likely2) {
  Alarm(2);
  return;
}
Bar();

I'd be very grateful for information on as many compilers and platforms as possible (but with gcc/x86 highlighted).

Please note I'm not interested in readability opinions on those two styles, neither in any "premature optimisation" claims.

EDIT: In other words, I'd like to ask if the two styles are at some point considered fully-totally-100% equivalent/transparent by a compiler (e.g. bit-by-bit equivalent AST at some point in a particular compiler), and if not, then what are the differences? For any (with a preference towards "modern" and gcc) compiler you know.

And, to make it more clear, I too don't suppose that it's going to give me much of a performance improvement, and that it usually would be premature optimization, but I am interested in whether and how much it can improve/degrade anything?

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The best way to determine this is to try it our for your specific environment and compiler. –  Sjoerd Mar 15 '11 at 10:59
1  
On modern processors, generally speaking short forward branches are not expensive, whereas mispredicted branches may be expensive. By "expensive" of course I mean a few cycles, and calls out of line to other functions will upset all such guesswork anyway. So there may be small differences, and those differences may depend on the actual code in Foo, Bar and Alarm. Unfortunately it's not possible to distinguish between significant and insignificant differences, or to account for details of those functions, without getting into the "premature optimization" area you're not interested in. –  Steve Jessop Mar 15 '11 at 11:04
1  
The traditional answer on non-modern processors without branch prediction, though, is that the first is likely to be more efficient since in the common case it takes fewer branches. –  Steve Jessop Mar 15 '11 at 11:06
3  
Whether you're "interested" in premature optimisation "claims" or not, this is one, and you shouldn't worry about it. Your compiler can choose the best code to produce. That doesn't go away just because you waved your hand and said so. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 15 '11 at 11:08
1  
@Tomalak: the code is "incomplete" in the sense that calling the condition "likely" conveys to me that the condition has a better than 50% chance of being true. It does not convey the same thing to the compiler. So akavel has information which could conceivably be of use in optimization, but which is not currently expressed in the code (read as portable C++). I think it's legitimate to want to know whether it's of practical use, and if so how to convey it. "Predict if false" is a compiler strategy that I have seen in real use, and introduces an implementation-specific semantic difference. –  Steve Jessop Mar 15 '11 at 12:21

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I have no answers for specific platforms, but I can make a few general points:

  • The traditional answer on non-modern processors without branch prediction, is that the first is likely to be more efficient since in the common case it takes fewer branches. But you seem interested in modern compilers and processors.

  • On modern processors, generally speaking short forward branches are not expensive, whereas mispredicted branches may be expensive. By "expensive" of course I mean a few cycles

  • Quite aside from this, the compiler is entitled to order basic blocks however it likes provided it doesn't change the logic. So when you write if (blah) {foo();} else {bar();}, the compiler is entitled to emit code like:

 

  evaluate condition blah
  jump_if_true else_label
  bar()
  jump endif_label
else_label:
  foo()
endif_label:

On the whole, gcc tends to emit things in roughly the order you write them, all else being equal. There are various things which make all else not equal, for example if you have the logical equivalent of bar(); return in two different places in your function, gcc might well coalesce those blocks, emit only one call to bar() followed by return, and jump or fall through to that from two different places.

  • There are two kinds of branch prediction - static and dynamic. Static means that the CPU instructions for the branch specify whether the condition is "likely", so that the CPU can optimize for the common case. Compilers might emit static branch predictions on some platforms, and if you're optimizing for that platform you might write code to take account of that. You can take account of it either by knowing how your compiler treats the various control structures, or by using compiler extensions. Personally I don't think it's consistent enough to generalize about what compilers will do. Look at the disassembly.

  • Dynamic branch prediction means that in hot code, the CPU will keep statistics for itself how likely branches are to be taken, and optimize for the common case. Modern processors use various different dynamic branch prediction techniques: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Branch_predictor. Performance-critical code pretty much is hot code, and as long as the dynamic branch prediction strategy works, it very rapidly optimizes hot code. There might be certain pathological cases that confuse particular strategies, but in general you can say that anything in a tight loop where there's a bias towards taken/not taken, will be correctly predicted most of the time

  • Sometimes it doesn't even matter whether the branch is correctly predicted or not, since some CPUs in some cases will include both possibilities in the instruction pipeline while it's waiting for the condition to be evaluated, and ditch the unnecessary option. Modern CPUs get complicated. Even much simpler CPU designs have ways of avoiding the cost of branching, though, such as conditional instructions on ARM.

  • Calls out of line to other functions will upset all such guesswork anyway. So in your example there may be small differences, and those differences may depend on the actual code in Foo, Bar and Alarm. Unfortunately it's not possible to distinguish between significant and insignificant differences, or to account for details of those functions, without getting into the "premature optimization" accusations you're not interested in.

  • It's almost always premature to micro-optimize code that isn't written yet. It's very hard to predict the performance of functions named Foo and Bar. Presumably the purpose of the question is to discern whether there's any common gotcha that should inform coding style. To which the answer is that, thanks to dynamic branch prediction, there is not. In hot code it makes very little difference how your conditions are arranged, and where it does make a difference that difference isn't as easily predictable as "it's faster to take / not take the branch in an if condition".

  • If this question was intended to apply to just one single program with this code proven to be hot, then of course it can be tested, there's no need to generalize.

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"no need to generalize" :-)) –  Bo Persson Mar 15 '11 at 12:48
    
Thanks a lot for this answer! Your suspicions for origin of the question were close to true when you wrote: "Presumably the purpose of the question is to discern whether there's any common gotcha that should inform coding style. To which the answer is that, thanks to dynamic branch prediction, there is not." But later I became just curious, and the rest of your answer perfectly satisfies my curiosity :) and provides interesting insights into modern compilers and CPUs. –  akavel Nov 4 '11 at 12:58

It depends greatly on the compiler, and the optimization settings. If the difference is crucial - implement both, and either analyze the assembly, or do benchmarks.

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I know it depends on those (please note that I've already mentioned I'm interested in various compilers). I do also know that for a concrete fragment of code benchmarks/assembly are The Final Answer (but this question is a bit more general). Otherwise, this answer for me reads as "I don't know", only more elaborate. –  akavel Mar 15 '11 at 11:37
    
@akavel: I really don't know. No-one does. If you have a specific compiler - go and check, I can help you with suggestions on what to check, as I did. If not - what's the point in asking? I think that had I written "42" it would be as correct as what I wrote. Because that's what you've asked. –  littleadv Mar 15 '11 at 11:42

It is compiler dependent. Check out the gcc documentation on __builtin_expect. Your compiler may have something similar. Note that you really should be concerned about premature optimization.

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Yes, I've seen the __builtin_expect & likes, and I'm interested in what's the default behaviour -- when not using them. –  akavel Mar 15 '11 at 11:40

The answer depends a lot on the type of "likely". If it is an integer constant expression, the compiler can optimize it and both cases will be equivalent. Otherwise, it will be evaluated in runtime and can't be optimized much.

Thus, case 2 is generally more efficient than case 1.

As input from real-time embedded systems, which I work with, your "case 2" is often the norm for code that is safety- and/or performance critical. Style guides for safety-critical embedded systems often allow this syntax so a function can quit quickly upon errors.

Generally, style guides will frown upon the "case 2" syntax, but make an exception to allow several returns in one function either if

1) the function needs to quit quickly and handle the error, or

2) if one single return at the end of the function leads to less readable code, which is often the case for various protocol and data parsers.

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1  
Why is (2) more efficient than (1) in the state case where both "likely" conditions are true? I'm prepared to believe it if there's a reason, but certainly the naive answer is that on a dumb CPU (1) would be slightly better due to taking 1 (or perhaps 0) branches instead of 2. Of course if the compiler by default static-predicts all if conditions as false, then it would be the other way around due to two mispredictions in the common case. –  Steve Jessop Mar 15 '11 at 11:19

If you are this concerned about performance, I assume you are using profile guided optimization.

If you are using profile guided optimization, the two variants you have proposed are exactly the same.

In any event, the performance of what you are asking about is completely overshadowed by performance characteristics of things not evident in your code samples, so we really can not answer this. You have to test the performance of both.

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Though I'm with everyone else here insofar as optimizing a branch makes no sense without having profiled and actually having found a bottleneck... if anything, it makes sense to optimize for the likely case.

Both likely1 and likely2 are likely, as their name suggests. Thus ruling out the also likely combination of both being true would likely be fastest:

if(likely1 && likely2)
{
    ... // happens most of the time
}else
{
    if(likely1)
        ...
    if(likely2)
        ...
    else if(!likely1 && !likely2) // happens almost never
        ...
}

Note that the second else is probably not necessary, a decent compiler will figure out that the last if clause cannot possibly be true if the previous one was, even if you don't explicitly tell it.

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if probability of each likely is 0.5, assuming they're unrelated, then probability of both being true is certainly not the fastest. Correct me if I'm rusty on my discrete math 101... That is exactly the kind of premature optimization you shouldn't be doing. –  littleadv Mar 15 '11 at 11:32
    
I'm not sure I'd call them "likely" if the probability was 0.5... –  Adam Bowen Mar 15 '11 at 11:45
    
@Adam, doesn't matter. probability of two independent events to happen together is less than the probability of each happening separately. –  littleadv Mar 15 '11 at 11:48
    
I think this just maintains the fallacy that putting something first in an if/else makes that case faster. –  Steve Jessop Mar 15 '11 at 11:56
    
@littleadv: What you fail to see is the fact that if both conditions are likely (0.5 is not likely, it's average, I would call 0.75 or 0.8 likely) then it is also either "likely" or at least "above average" that they are both true. The exception being a linear correlation between the two conditional of which there is no mention (the OP would not make sense in that case, either). Which means you have reduce the number of branches by 2 for the case that occurs more often at the cost of increasing it by 1 for the case that occurs less often - which is a net gain. –  Damon Mar 15 '11 at 13:23

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