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I don't like standard mechanism of configuration in the .NET Framework. (ConfgurationManager, ConfigurationSection and other).

I want a simpler ability to manage my application configuration files.

For example, I want to create a folder named "Settings" in my application folder. There are several config files named.

Please, take a look:

Settings:
- smtp.config
- database.config
- something.config

Assume, the "smtp.config" file has the following simple stucture:

<smtp>
  <username>something</username>
  <hostname>something</hostname>
  ...
</smtp>

And I want to create the following class:

public class MySmtpSettings : SomeBaseClassFromSomeConfigLibrary
{
   // May be some simple attributes here
   public string username;

   // May be some simple attributes here. For example:
   // Like XPath: [ConfigAttr("smtp\username")], or simply: ConfigAttr("username")
   public string hostname;
   ...

   // Only code containing properties declaration.
}

And I want to use my setting object like:

var settings = new MySmtpSettings("smtp.config");
var hostname = settings.Hostname;

I don't want to use the ConfigurationSection class. It looks very hard.

Do you know where I can find an extensible, simple open source library for this?

UPD.

@jjrdk: Thank you for your answer but using the ConfigurationSection class I usually create the next code:

public class MyConfigurationSection : ConfigurationSection
{

  [ConfigurationProperty("username")]
  public ConfigurationTextElement<string> Username
  {
     get { return (ConfigurationTextElement<string>)this["username"]; }
     set { this["username"] = value; }
  }

  // ...
{

public class ConfigurationTextElement<T> : ConfigurationElement
{
    private T _value;
    protected override void DeserializeElement(XmlReader reader, bool serializeCollectionKey)
    {
        _value = (T)reader.ReadElementContentAs(typeof(T), null);
    }
    public T Value
    {
        get { return _value; }
    }
}

It does not look simple. Maybe I do something I do not understand?

share|improve this question
4  
I'd suggest that you rethink your view of the ConfigurationSection class. It's not that hard and does exactly what you are requesting. See it as a learning experience. –  jjrdk Mar 15 '11 at 12:06
    
What don't you like about the standard mechanism of configuration in the .NET Framework? –  RQDQ Mar 15 '11 at 12:09
    
@RQDQ: It requires a lot of code to describe the links between a classes and files. –  Jean Louis Mar 15 '11 at 12:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you don't want to use the ConfigurationManager you might want to look at a few of the object serializers.

You could also use one of the many Dependency Injection (DI)/Inversion of Control (IoC) frameworks... but if you don't like the complexity behind ConfigurationManager I'm sure you fill find DI even less appealing.

As a side note could you even use LINQ-to-XML or one of the many other XML/Text readers within the .Net Framework. Even good-ole INI files.

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1  
I love the DataContractSerializer and have used it for many things. However, one downside of the DataContractSerializer (especially for config files that might get manually edited in notepad) is the xml elements must be in alphabetic order. This is done for performance reasons, but isn't intuitive for config files. –  RQDQ Mar 15 '11 at 12:24
    
Very true. I also avoid it for config fiels because it doesn't support XML attributes (without a custom serializer.) –  Matthew Whited Mar 15 '11 at 12:49
    
The XmlSerializer looks very intresting for me. I will try it now. –  Jean Louis Mar 15 '11 at 12:50

I have used a piece of code that I don't know where it came from in the beginning, but using Google Code Search I managed to find it here: http://m3dafort2d.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/projects/NCode/NCode/Configuration/

I then use it like this:

public class AppSettings : DictionaryConvertible
{
    public AppSettings() { 
       // For unit testing
    }

    public AppSettings(ISettingsProvider settingsProvider) 
        : base(settingsProvider) {}        

    public string MyStringSetting { get; set; }
    public int MyIntSetting { get; set; }
    public bool MyBooleanSetting { get; set; }
}

This is setup to be used in a IoC scenario, but you can probably find a way to use it in a normal way.

I usually just configure the ISettingsProvider in the IoC container and then I configure the AppSettings class as well. I can then just inject that class into any component that need the settings. I can also split the configuration settings classes into several class if I want to group them into logical collections.

If you want to read settings for somewhere different than the AppSettings in web.config, simply implement another ISettingsProvider. I created one for SQL Server at one point.

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Writing a ConfigurationSectionHandler is not hard; it's simply a matter of traversing the nodes in the XML that's given to you as a parameter when the ConfigurationManager calls your code. You write one method (and probably a few helpers) that returns the data structure that you want for your configuration. For simple XML, the method can be quite simple as well. See the samples at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms228056.aspx.

public class MyHandler : IConfigurationSectionHandler
{
    #region IConfigurationSectionHandler Members

    public object Create(object parent, object configContext, XmlNode section)
    {
        var config = new MailConfiguration();
        foreach (XmlAttribute attribute in section.GetAttributes())
        {
              switch (attribute.Name)
              {
                   case "server":
                       config.Server = attribute.Value;
                       break;
                   ...
              }
        }

        foreach (XmlNode node in section.ChildNodes)
        {
              switch (node.Name)
              {
                   case "server":
                       config.Server = node.Value;
                       break;
                   ...
              }
        }
    }

    return config;

    #endregion
  }
}

Used as

var config = ConfigurationManager.GetSection("smtp") as MailConfiguration;
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it looks well. But why has the IConfigurationSectionHandler been deprecated in the .NET Framework version 2.0? (there are a note that is contained at the page you given me) –  Jean Louis Mar 15 '11 at 12:43

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