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I am using .net 1.1. I have a session class in which I have stored many static variables that hold some data to be used by many classes.

I want to find a simple way of destroying this class instead of resetting every variable one by one. For example if there is a static class MyStatic, I would have liked to destroy/remove this class from the memory by writing MyStatic = null, which is not currently possible,

Additional question.

The idea of singleton is good, but I have the following questions:

If singleton is implemented, the 'single' object will still remain in the memory. In singleton, we are only checking if an instance is already existing. how can i make sure that this instance variable also gets destroyed.

I have a main class which initializes the variable in the static class. Even if I plan to implement a Rest() method, I need to call it from a method, for eg, the destructor in the main class. But this destructor gets called only when GC collects this main class object in the memory, which means the Reset() gets called very late

thanks pradeep

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8 Answers 8

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Don't use a static class to store your variables. Use an instance (and make it a singleton if you only want one instance at any given time.) You can then implement IDisposible, and just call Dispose() when you want to destroy it.

For more information check out this site: http://csharpindepth.com/Articles/General/Singleton.aspx

EDIT

The object is still subject to garbage collection, so unless you are using lots of unmanaged resources, you should be fine. You can implement IDisposible to clean up any resources that need to be cleaned up as well.

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Is it an error to create more than one? If not don't use the Singleton pattern and just use a regular class. –  Ron Warholic Feb 10 '09 at 6:18
    
Right, you only need to create a singleton if none of the class members rely on instance data that could potentially be different from instance to instance. Generally, if you could implement the member as static, then it should work in a singleton just fine. –  Kyle Trauberman Feb 10 '09 at 7:06

Instead of a static class, have a static instance of a class:

class Foo
{
  public int Something;
  public static Foo Instance = new Foo();
  public void Reset()
  {
    Instance = new Foo();
  }
}

void test
{
  int i = Foo.Instance.Something;
}

You can also delegate to an instance of the class:

class Foo
{
  public int Something
  {
    get { return instance.something; }
  }
  private int something;
  private static Foo instance = new Foo();
  public void Reset()
  {
    instance = new Foo();
  }
}

void test
{
  int i = Foo.Something;
}
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There's no way to destroy a static unless it resides in a separate AppDomain in which case you can get rid of it by unloading the AppDomain. However it is usually better to avoid statics.

EDIT: Additional question

When the singleton is no longer referenced it will be collected just as everything else. In other words, if you want it collected you must make sure that there are no references to it. It goes without saying that if you store a static reference to your singleton, you will have the same problem as before.

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Use a Singleton like ktrauberman said, and have an initialization method or a reset method. You only have to write the code once and call the method.

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class myclass

{

private static myclass singleobj = null;
private myclass(){}
public static myclass CreateInstance()
{
if(singleobj == null)
  singleobj =  new myclass();

return singleobj
}

}
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I much prefer the pattern: return singleobj ?? (singleobj = new myclass()); –  abelenky Feb 10 '09 at 7:01

Building on Ahemd Said's answer: (and props to him!)

class Singleton
{
    private static Singleton instance  = null;
    private Singleton(){}   // private constructor: stops others from using

    public static Singleton Instance
    {
        get { return instance ?? (instance = new Singleton()); }
        set {
                if (null != value)
                { throw new InvalidValueException(); }
                else
                { instance = null; }
            }
    }
}


void SampleUsage()
{
    Singleton myObj = Singleton.Instance;
    // use myObj for your work...
    myObj.Instance = null;  // The set-operator makes it ready for GC
}

(untested... but mostly right, I think) You could also add in usage of the IDispose interface for more cleanup.

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I want to know while the memory space referred by 'Instance' is waiting to be collected by GC, if the same object is referred by some other variable, will the object contain the new values or the old value? –  pradeeptp Feb 10 '09 at 7:36
    
I confess, there is likely a bug in my code in that regard. –  abelenky Feb 10 '09 at 8:09
    
I think the last line in the SampleUsage is inoccrect in sampleusage? –  Ahmed Said Feb 11 '09 at 7:47

The best way in your condition is to have an Reset() method built-in as well, which can reset the values of the class.

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You destroy objects, not classes. There's nothing wrong with static classes--C# provides them for a reason. Singletons are just extra overhead, unless you actually need an object, e.g. when you have to pass the object as a parameter.

Static classes contain only static variables. These variables tend to last for the lifetime of the app, in which case you don't have to worry about disposing referenced objects, unless you have a mild case of OCD. That just leaves the case where your static class allocates and releases resources throughout its lifetime. Dispose of these objects in due course as you usually would (e.g., "using...").

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