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Google pages suggest you to minify HTML, that is, remove all the unnecessary spaces. CodeIgniter does have the feature of giziping output or it can be done via .htaccess. But still I also would like to remove unnecessary spaces from the final HTML output as well.

I played a bit with this piece of code to do it, and it seems to work. This does indeed result in HTML that is without excess spaces and removes other tab formatting.

class Welcome extends CI_Controller 
{
    function _output()
    {
        echo preg_replace('!\s+!', ' ', $output);
    }

    function index(){
    ...
    }
}

The problem is there may be tags like <pre>,<textarea>, etc.. which may have spaces in them and a regular expression should remove them. So, how do I remove excess space from the final HTML, without effecting spaces or formatting for these certain tags using a regular expression?

Thanks to @Alan Moore got the answer, this worked for me

echo preg_replace('#(?ix)(?>[^\S ]\s*|\s{2,})(?=(?:(?:[^<]++|<(?!/?(?:textarea|pre)\b))*+)(?:<(?>textarea|pre)\b|\z))#', ' ', $output);

ridgerunner did a very good job of analyzing this regular expression. I ended up using his solution. Cheers to ridgerunner.

share|improve this question
12  
Do not do HTML using regular expressions. – SLaks Mar 15 '11 at 13:23
    
Infinite upvotes to you, SLaks. – Delan Azabani Mar 15 '11 at 13:24
    
ok, so what could be a good way of reformatting final html output then? – Aman Mar 15 '11 at 13:30
2  
Like the two others comments above, I suggest you to read this great answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/728260/html-minification/… Don't do that. Do much more before.. – guillaumepotier Mar 15 '11 at 13:34
    
possible duplicate... stackoverflow.com/questions/3480343/… – jondavidjohn Mar 15 '11 at 14:20
up vote 34 down vote accepted

For those curious about how Alan Moore's regex works (and yes, it does work), I've taken the liberty of commented it so it can be read by mere mortals:

function process_data_alan($text) // 
{
    $re = '%# Collapse ws everywhere but in blacklisted elements.
        (?>             # Match all whitespaces other than single space.
          [^\S ]\s*     # Either one [\t\r\n\f\v] and zero or more ws,
        | \s{2,}        # or two or more consecutive-any-whitespace.
        ) # Note: The remaining regex consumes no text at all...
        (?=             # Ensure we are not in a blacklist tag.
          (?:           # Begin (unnecessary) group.
            (?:         # Zero or more of...
              [^<]++    # Either one or more non-"<"
            | <         # or a < starting a non-blacklist tag.
              (?!/?(?:textarea|pre)\b)
            )*+         # (This could be "unroll-the-loop"ified.)
          )             # End (unnecessary) group.
          (?:           # Begin alternation group.
            <           # Either a blacklist start tag.
            (?>textarea|pre)\b
          | \z          # or end of file.
          )             # End alternation group.
        )  # If we made it here, we are not in a blacklist tag.
        %ix';
    $text = preg_replace($re, " ", $text);
    return $text;
}

I'm new around here, but I can see right off that Alan is quite good at regex. I would only add the following suggestions.

  1. There is an unnecessary capture group which can be removed.
  2. Although the OP did not say so, the <SCRIPT> element should be added to the <PRE> and <TEXTAREA> blacklist.
  3. Adding the 'S' PCRE "study" modifier speeds up this regex by about 20%.
  4. There is an alternation group in the lookahead which is ripe for applying Friedl's "unrolling-the-loop" efficiency construct.
  5. On a more serious note, this same alternation group: (i.e. (?:[^<]++|<(?!/?(?:textarea|pre)\b))*+) is susceptible to excessive PCRE recursion on large target strings, which can result in a stack-overflow causing the Apache/PHP executable to silently seg-fault and crash with no warning. (The Win32 build of Apache httpd.exe is particularly susceptible to this because it has only 256KB stack compared to the *nix executables, which are typically built with 8MB stack or more.) Philip Hazel (the author of the PCRE regex engine used in PHP) discusses this issue in the documentation: PCRE DISCUSSION OF STACK USAGE. Although Alan has correctly applied the same fix as Philip shows in this document (applying a possessive plus to the first alternative), there will still be a lot of recursion if the HTML file is large and has a lot of non-blacklisted tags. e.g. On my Win32 box (with an executable having a 256KB stack), the script blows up with a test file of only 60KB. Note also that PHP unfortunately does not follow the recommendations and sets the default recursion limit way too high at 100000. (According to the PCRE docs this should be set to a value equal to the stack size divided by 500).

Here is an improved version which is faster than the original, handles larger input, and gracefully fails with a message if the input string is too large to handle:

// Set PCRE recursion limit to sane value = STACKSIZE / 500
// ini_set("pcre.recursion_limit", "524"); // 256KB stack. Win32 Apache
ini_set("pcre.recursion_limit", "16777");  // 8MB stack. *nix
function process_data_jmr1($text) // 
{
    $re = '%# Collapse whitespace everywhere but in blacklisted elements.
        (?>             # Match all whitespaces other than single space.
          [^\S ]\s*     # Either one [\t\r\n\f\v] and zero or more ws,
        | \s{2,}        # or two or more consecutive-any-whitespace.
        ) # Note: The remaining regex consumes no text at all...
        (?=             # Ensure we are not in a blacklist tag.
          [^<]*+        # Either zero or more non-"<" {normal*}
          (?:           # Begin {(special normal*)*} construct
            <           # or a < starting a non-blacklist tag.
            (?!/?(?:textarea|pre|script)\b)
            [^<]*+      # more non-"<" {normal*}
          )*+           # Finish "unrolling-the-loop"
          (?:           # Begin alternation group.
            <           # Either a blacklist start tag.
            (?>textarea|pre|script)\b
          | \z          # or end of file.
          )             # End alternation group.
        )  # If we made it here, we are not in a blacklist tag.
        %Six';
    $text = preg_replace($re, " ", $text);
    if ($text === null) exit("PCRE Error! File too big.\n");
    return $text;
}

p.s. I am intimately familiar with this PHP/Apache seg-fault problem, as I was involved with helping the Drupal community while they were wrestling with this issue. See: Optimize CSS option causes php cgi to segfault in pcre function "match". We also experienced this with the BBCode parser on the FluxBB forum software project.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow that was quite in depth analysis, I didn't knew all these details. Thanx a lot, I will try your regex. – Aman Mar 17 '11 at 4:41
    
could i have the test file that you were using ? – Aman Mar 17 '11 at 10:28
    
@Aman Yes, but it will be some time before I post it (the file is an article in progress (in HTML)...) – ridgerunner Mar 18 '11 at 5:02
2  
@william - "render"? error 324 from what - httpd.exe? php.exe? Will need more information to proceed. First try setting pcre.recursion_limit to 524 (the script currently sets it to 16777). Just comment out the one line and uncomment the other. – ridgerunner Jul 26 '12 at 17:36
1  
@maartenmachiels - Sorry but I can't offer you an opinion one way or the other. If you do use regex, be sure to read and take safeguards as recommended in my answer to a similar question. Stack overflows and silent crashing of executables is not good! – ridgerunner Feb 6 '14 at 16:28

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