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So my whole problem is that I have two files one with following format(for Python 2.6):

#comments
config = {
    #comments
    'name': 'hello',
    'see?': 'world':'ABC',CLASS=3
}

This file has number of sections like this. Second file has format:

[23]
[config]
 'name'='abc'
 'see?'=
[23]

Now the requirement is that I need to compare both files and generate file as:

#comments
config = {
    #comments
    'name': 'abc',
    'see?': 'world':'ABC',CLASS=3
}

So the result file will contain the values from the first file, unless the value for same attribute is there in second file, which will overwrite the value. Now my problem is how to manipulate these files using Python.

Thanks in advance and for your previous answers in short time ,I need to use python 2.6

share|improve this question
    
The first one you can actually just import and use "config" afterwards. For the second type you probably need to write a little parser, which is a hard task if you never did it but a fairly easy one if you know what to do. Depending on how much time you have you should seriously consider learning parsers with that example. It is an important weapon in every coders arsenal. I would even say that you can barely call yourself coder without that skill. – erikb85 Mar 15 '11 at 13:57
2  
No need to write a parser, python has batteries included: configparser cc @erikb – Ocaso Protal Mar 15 '11 at 14:02
    
configparser didn't work, since the key/value pairs are surrounded by '-chars. Possibly commas will cause havoc as well... – Jonas Byström Mar 15 '11 at 15:11
    
erikb: importing won't include the comments. – Jonas Byström Mar 15 '11 at 15:16
    
@Space_C0wb0y thanks for editing ,I am new to this blog so code was not properly edited – Jagdev Singh Mar 16 '11 at 5:57

Was unable to find a beautiful solution due to the comments. This is tested and works for me, but requires Python 3.1 or higher:

from collections import OrderedDict

indenting = '\t'

def almost_py_read(f):
    sections = OrderedDict()
    contents = None
    active = sections
    for line in f:
        line = line.strip()
        if line.startswith('#'):
            active[line] = None
        elif line.endswith('{'):
            k = line.split('=')[0].strip()
            contents = OrderedDict()
            active = contents
            sections[k] = contents
        elif line.endswith('}'):
            active = sections
        else:
            try:
                k, v = line.split(':')
                k = k.strip()
                v = v.strip()
                active[k] = v
            except:
                pass
    return sections

def almost_ini_read(f):
    sections = OrderedDict()
    contents = None
    for line in f:
        line = line.strip()
        try:
            k, v = line.split('=')
            k = k.strip()
            v = v.strip()
            if v:
                contents[k] = v
        except:
            if line.startswith('[') and line.endswith(']'):
                contents = OrderedDict()
                sections[line[1:-1]] = contents
    print(sections)
    return sections

def compilefiles(pyname, ininame):
    sections = almost_py_read(open(pyname, 'rt'))
    override_sections = almost_ini_read(open(ininame, "rt"))
    for section_key, section_value in override_sections.items():
        if not sections.get(section_key):
            sections[section_key] = OrderedDict()
        for k, v in section_value.items():
            sections[section_key][k] = v
    return sections

def output(d, indent=''):
    for k, v in d.items():
        if v == None:
            print(indent+k)
        elif v:
            if type(v) == str:
                print(indent+k+': '+v+',')
            else:
                print(indent+k+' = {')
                output(v, indent+indenting)
                print(indent+'}')

d = compilefiles('a.txt', 'b.ini')
output(d)

Output:

#comments
config = {
    #comments
    'name': 'abc',
    'see?': 'world',
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Jonas Byström gosh ! you have great capacities, but you spoil them by ignoring regex tools. IMHO – eyquem Mar 15 '11 at 16:44
    
@eyquem Hehe, how much can you cut out using regex? Post the answer! :) – Jonas Byström Mar 15 '11 at 19:36
    
@Jonas Bystrom ,thanks for your answer but my requirement is that I have to use python 2.6 and as you written about comments we can remove the comments and I am confused with split because first file may be like #comments config = { #comments 'name': 'hello', 'see?': { 'world':'india':'jagdev' }, } And the output will be#comments config = { #comments 'name': 'abc', 'see?': { 'world':'india':'jagdev' }, } – Jagdev Singh Mar 16 '11 at 6:12
    
@Jonas Bystrom ,Now I chaged the code now have a look on code ,should I need to write a parser if so where to find the easy step to write parser. – Jagdev Singh Mar 16 '11 at 14:41
    
@Jagdev Have a look at eyquem's solution. If that doesn't do it for ya, build something that parse your stuff into a tree. Google and time is your friend, good luck! – Jonas Byström Mar 16 '11 at 15:54

I had a really long and hard time to manage to write the following code.

I had difficulties to manage with commas. I wanted the updated file to have after the updating the same format as the file to update before the updating : lines end with a comma, except for the last one.

This code is crafted for the particular problem as exposed by the questioner and can't be used as-is for another type of problem. I know. It's the problem of using a code based on regex and not on a parser, I'm fully aware of that. But I think that it is a canvas that can be relatively easily adapted to other cases, by changing the regexes, which is a relatively readily process thanks to the malleability of regexes.

def file_updating(updating_filename,updating_data_extractor,filename_to_update):
    # function whose name is hold by updating_data_extractor parameter 
    # is a function that 
    # extracts data from the file whose name is hold by updating_filename parameter
    # and must return a tuple:
    # ( updating dictionary , compiled regex )
    updating_dico,pat = updating_data_extractor( updating_filename )

    with open(filename_to_update,'r+') as f:
        lines = f.readlines()

        def jiji(line,dico = updating_dico ):
            mat = pat.search(line.rstrip())
            if mat and mat.group(3) in dico:
                return '%s: %s,' % (mat.group(1),dico.pop(mat.group(3)))
            else:
                return line.rstrip(',') + ','

        li = [jiji(line) for line in lines[0:-1] ] # [0:-1] because last line is '}'
        front = (mit.group(2) for mit in ( pat.search(line) for line in lines ) if mit).next()
        li.extend(front + '%s: %s,' % item for item in updating_dico.iteritems() )
        li[-1] = li[-1].rstrip(',')
        li.append('}')

        f.seek(0,0)
        f.writelines( '\n'.join(li)  )
        f.truncate()

Exemplifying code:

import re

bef1 = '''#comments
config =
{
#comments
    'name': 'hello',
    'arctic':01011101,
    'summu': 456,
    'see?': 'world',
    'armorique': 'bretagne'
}'''

bef2 = '''#comments
config =
{
#comments
    'name': 'abc',
    'see?': { 'world':'india':'jagdev'},
}'''



def one_extractor(data_containing_filename):

    with open(data_containing_filename) as g:
        contg = re.search('\[(\d+)\].+\[config\](.*?)\[(\\1)\]',g.read(),re.DOTALL)
        if contg:
            updtgen = ( re.match("([^=]+)=[ \f\t\v]*([^ \f\t\v].*|)",line.strip())
                        for line in contg.group(2).splitlines() )
            updating_data =  dict( mi.groups() for mi in updtgen if mi and mi.group(2))
        else:
            from sys import exit
            exit(updating_filename + " isn't a valid file for updating")

    pat = re.compile("(([ \t]*)([^:]+)):\s*(.+),?")

    return (updating_data,pat)



for bef in (bef1,bef2):

    # file to update:  rudu.txt
    with open('rudu.txt','w') as jecr:
        jecr.write(bef)

    # updating data:   renew_rudu.txt
    with open('renew_rudu.txt','w') as jecr:
        jecr.write('''[23]
    [config]
     'nuclear'= 'apocalypse'
     'name'='abc'
     'armorique'= 'BRETAGNE'
     'arctic'=
     'boloni'=7600
     'see?'=
     'summu'='tumulus'
    [23]''')


    print 'BEFORE ---------------------------------'
    with open('rudu.txt') as lir:
        print lir.read()

    print '\nUPDATING DATA --------------------------'
    with open('renew_rudu.txt') as lir:
        print lir.read()

    file_updating('renew_rudu.txt',one_extractor,'rudu.txt')

    print '\nAFTER ================================='
    with open('rudu.txt','r') as f:
        print f.read()

    print '\n\nX#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#\n'

Result:

>>> 
BEFORE ---------------------------------
#comments
config =
{
#comments
    'name': 'hello',
    'arctic':01011101,
    'summu': 456,
    'see?': 'world',
    'armorique': 'bretagne'
}

UPDATING DATA --------------------------
[23]
    [config]
     'nuclear'= 'apocalypse'
     'name'='abc'
     'armorique'= 'BRETAGNE'
     'arctic'=
     'boloni'=7600
     'see?'=
     'summu'='tumulus'
    [23]

AFTER =================================
#comments,
config =,
{,
#comments,
    'name': 'abc',
    'arctic':01011101,
    'summu': 'tumulus',
    'see?': 'world',
    'armorique': 'BRETAGNE',
    'boloni': 7600,
    'nuclear': 'apocalypse'
}


X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#

BEFORE ---------------------------------
#comments
config =
{
#comments
    'name': 'abc',
    'see?': { 'world':'india':'jagdev'},
}

UPDATING DATA --------------------------
[23]
    [config]
     'nuclear'= 'apocalypse'
     'name'='abc'
     'armorique'= 'BRETAGNE'
     'arctic'=
     'boloni'=7600
     'see?'=
     'summu'='tumulus'
    [23]

AFTER =================================
#comments,
config =,
{,
#comments,
    'name': 'abc',
    'see?': { 'world':'india':'jagdev'},
    'armorique': 'BRETAGNE',
    'boloni': 7600,
    'summu': 'tumulus',
    'nuclear': 'apocalypse'
}


X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#X#

>>>  

.

EDIT:

I have improved the code because I was still insatisfied. Now the "variable" front catches the blank characters ( ' ' or '\t' ) at the beginning of the data-containing lines in the file to be updated.

I had also forgot the instruction f.truncate() which is very important to not keep a tail of undesired characters.

I am satisfied to see that my code works well even with the following file in which a value is a dictionnary, as presented by Jagdev:

#comments
config =
{
#comments
    'name': 'abc',
    'see?': { 'world':'india':'jagdev'},
}

That confirms me in my choice to process line after line , and not trying to run through the entire file with a regex.

.

EDIT 2:

I again changed the code. The updating is performed by a function that takes as arguments :

  • the name of the updating file (the file containing the data used to udpdate another file)

  • and the function that is suited to extract the data from this particular updating file

Hence, it is possible to update a given file with data from various updating files. That makes the code more generic.

share|improve this answer

Very roughly (i.e. this hasn't been tested at all, and there are numerous imprvements that could be made such as the use of regex and/or pretty-printing):

dicts = []
with open('file1') as file1:
  try:
    file1content = file1.read()
    eval(file1content )
    file1content.strip(' ')
    file1content.strip('\t')
    for line in file1content.splitlines():
      if '={' in line: 
        dicts.append(line.split('={').strip())
  except:
    print 'file1 not valid'
with open('file2') as file2:
  filelines = file2.readlines()
  while filelines:
    while filelines and '[23]' not in filelines[0]:
      filelines.pop(0)
    if filelines:
      filelines.pop(0)
      dictname = filelines.pop(0).split('[')[1].split(']')[0]
      if dictname not in dicts:
        dicts.append(dictname)
        exec(dictname + ' = {}')
      while filelines and '[23]' not in filelines[0]:
        line = filelines.pop(0)
        [k,v] = line.split('=')
        k.strip()
        v.strip()
        if v:
          exec(dictname + '[k] = v')
with open('file3', 'w') as file3:
  file3content = '\n'.join([`eval(dictname)` for dictname in dicts])
  file3.write(file3content)
share|improve this answer

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