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For MySQL, I want a query that returns a SUM of an expression, EXCEPT that I want the returned value to be NULL if any of the expressions included in the SUM are NULL. (The normal operation of SUM is to ignore NULL values.

Here's a simple test case that illustrates

CREATE TABLE t4 (fee VARCHAR(3), fi INT);
INSERT INTO t4 VALUES ('fo',10),('fo',200),('fo',NULL),('fum',400);

SELECT fee, SUM(fi) AS sum_fi FROM t4 GROUP BY fee

This returns exactly the result set I expect:

fee sum_fi
--- ------
fo     210
fum    400

What I want is a query that returns a DIFFERENT result set:

fee sum_fi
--- ------
fo    NULL
fum    400

What I want is for the value returned for sum_fi to be NULL whenever an included value is NULL. (This is different than the SUM aggregate function ignores NULL, and returns a total for the non-NULL expressions.)

Question: What query can I use to return the desired result set?

I don't find any built in aggregate function that exhibits this behavior.

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2  
similar question with marked solution: stackoverflow.com/questions/1288953/… –  Aaron W. Mar 15 '11 at 13:57
    
Thanks Aaron, my search didn't find that question. –  spencer7593 Mar 17 '11 at 22:12
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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

How about using SUM(fi is NULL) to determine if you have a NULL value in your data set? This should work:

SELECT fee, IF(SUM(fi is NULL), NULL, SUM(fi)) AS sum_fi FROM t4 GROUP BY fee
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thanks, this is working just fine for me. –  spencer7593 Mar 15 '11 at 20:12
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You can use this query:

SELECT fee, 
       IF(COUNT(fi) < (SELECT count(fee) FROM t4 temp2 WHERE temp1.fee = temp2.fee),
           NULL, SUM(fi)) AS sum_fi
FROM t4 temp1 GROUP BY fee

There is also this solution:

SELECT fee, CASE WHEN COUNT(*) = COUNT(fi) THEN SUM(fi) ELSE NULL END AS sum_fi
FROM t4 GROUP BY fee

which I derived from the answer of the question Aaron W tagged as a duplicate of this. Admittedly, the latter form looks better than my original idea.

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@spencer7593: The query had an error which I just fixed. Can you confirm? –  Jon Mar 15 '11 at 13:58
    
I prefer the second form. In my actual query (rather than the test case), the row source is not a simple t4, it is several tables joined with several predicates. I'd prefer not to repeat the specification for the t4 row source. –  spencer7593 Mar 15 '11 at 15:19
    
thanks - the second form works just fine for me. –  spencer7593 Mar 15 '11 at 20:13
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