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I have an update stored procedure that implements optimistic locking. The stored procedure looks like this:

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[usp_Test] 
    @Id AS char(2),
       @recordTimestamp as timestamp
       ...
BEGIN       
    UPDATE XY
           ..
          WHERE ((Id = @Id) AND (recordTimeStamp = @recordTimestamp))       

if @@rowcount = 0
begin
RAISERROR ('this row was changed by another user', 18, 1)
end

SELECT timeStamp from XY where Id = @Idend

Is there a simpler way to return the new timestamp? I would really like to avoid the SELECT statement.

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1  
What version of SQL Server? –  Martin Smith Mar 15 '11 at 14:02
    
Microsoft SQL 2008 R2 –  Sebastjan Mar 15 '11 at 14:17
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Assuming at least SQL Server 2005 you can use OUTPUT

UPDATE XY
SET Col = 'foo'
OUTPUT inserted.recordTimeStamp
WHERE ((Id = @Id) AND (recordTimeStamp = @recordTimestamp))    

Or a version that uses a table variable to more closely mirror the behaviour of the original query.

DECLARE @Timestamp TABLE(stamp binary(8))

UPDATE XY
SET col='foo'
OUTPUT inserted.recordTimeStamp INTO @Timestamp
WHERE (Id = @Id) AND (recordTimeStamp = @recordTimestamp) 

if @@rowcount = 0
begin
RAISERROR ('this row was changed by another user', 18, 1)
end

SELECT stamp 
FROM @Timestamp
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It allmost works. The only problem is, that it skips the last if clause. ->> if @@rowcount = 0 begin RAISERROR ('this row was changed by another user', 18, 1) end –  Sebastjan Mar 15 '11 at 14:15
    
@@rowcount will still be zero if the timestamp doesn't match so the error will still be raised. If an empty result set is output then you also know that it didn't match. You could OUTPUT INTO @tablevariable then select from that at the end also. –  Martin Smith Mar 15 '11 at 14:18
    
Obviously I was blind. –  Sebastjan Mar 15 '11 at 15:18
    
@Damien - Yes it is empty. It doesn't return a time stamp in that case. I think that's the OP's desired result with the severity 18 error –  Martin Smith Mar 15 '11 at 15:29
    
@Martin - yeah, I realised after I commented that he was seeking this value if the update succeeded. I'd initially read it as some form of "how do I found out what the new value is that blocked my update", but realised that that didn't make a whole heap of sense either (since you'd want to know the other column values also) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Mar 15 '11 at 15:32
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Obviously I was blind. @@DBTS(http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms187366(SQL.90).aspx) command is the right way to go.

   ...
if @@rowcount = 0 
begin 
RAISERROR ('this row was changed by another user', 18, 1) 
end  
SELECT @@DBTS
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No I don't think so. That looks like a global variable not a connection scoped one from the docs. If you have concurrency it could return the value from a completely different row. The OUTPUT clause is the correct way. I would do it as per my answer. If for some reason your code can't deal with that then you would need to OUTPUT inserted.recordTimeStamp INTO @TableVariable then do the select from that at the end. –  Martin Smith Mar 15 '11 at 15:21
    
Yes you are right. The global variable @@DBTS returns the last-used timestamp value (VARBINARY) of the current database. I rushed into the wrong directions. Thank you. –  Sebastjan Mar 16 '11 at 8:17
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