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Incorrect decrement of the reference count of an object that is not owned at this point by the caller on iPhone. It is happening with NSString which I clearly init and release within the for loop. I have tried to do the same as an autoreleases string but I get leaks. I assume the culprit is the stringbytrimming call. Any suggestions, by the way this does not leak, but I get the warning in build and analyze. Everything also works fine and the app does not crash.

for(int i=0;i<storyQuantity;i++) {
            NSString *imageString = [[NSString alloc] init];
            imageString = [[[storiesArray objectAtIndex:i] objectForKey: @"image"] stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet:[NSCharacterSet whitespaceAndNewlineCharacterSet]];  // must add trimming to remove characters

            imageLoader *imageOperation = [[imageLoader alloc] initWithImageURL:imageString target:self action:@selector(didImageLoad:) number:i];

            AppDelegate_iPad *appDelegate = [[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate];
            [appDelegate.queue_ addOperation:imageOperation];
            [imageOperation release];
            [imageString release];
        }

UPDATE - added my imageLoader class, which to the best of my knowledge does not have a leak

- (id)initWithImageURL:(NSString *)url target:(id)target action:(SEL)action number:(int)number {
    if(self = [super init]) {
        _action = action;
        _target = target;
        _number = number;
        if(url == nil) {
            return nil;
        } else {
            _imgURL = [[NSURL alloc] initWithString:[url copy]];
        }
    }
    return self;
}

- (id)main {

    NSAutoreleasePool *pool = [NSAutoreleasePool new];

    if ([self isCancelled]) {
        NSLog(@"OPERATION CANCELLED");
        [UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = NO;
        [pool drain];
        return nil;
    } else {

        [UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = YES;

        NSData *imgData = [[NSData alloc] initWithContentsOfURL:_imgURL];
        UIImage *image = [[UIImage alloc] initWithData:imgData];
        [imgData release];

        if ([self isCancelled]) {
            NSLog(@"OPERATION CANCELLED");
            [image release];
            [UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = NO;
            [pool drain];
            return nil;
        } else { 

            NSNumber *tempNumber = [NSNumber numberWithInt:_number];
            NSDictionary *tempDict = [NSDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys:tempNumber, @"number", image, @"image", nil];
            [image release];

            if([_target respondsToSelector:_action])
                [_target performSelectorOnMainThread:_action withObject:tempDict waitUntilDone:NO];
        }
    }

    [pool drain];
    return nil;

}

- (void)dealloc {
    [_imgURL release];
    [super dealloc];
}
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It seems like you could use a bit of brushing up on your C pointer skills. I recommend studying: boredzo.org/pointers –  Dave DeLong Mar 15 '11 at 14:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Since you are reassigning the imageString variable, the reference to the original object is lost. Why allocate an empty string anyway? Just change the code to

NSString *imageString = [[[storiesArray objectAtIndex:i] objectForKey: @"image"]
   stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet:[NSCharacterSet whitespaceAndNewlineCharacterSet]];

and remove the [imageString release] and you're good to go.

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thanks, but this gives me a leak. again more than likely due to stringbytrimmingcharacters, i could try retain and then release with it. –  zambono Mar 15 '11 at 16:23
    
You are actually going 'the autorelease route' right now. stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet returns an autoreleased instance, which you happen to (incorrectly) release manually as well. –  Rengers Mar 15 '11 at 16:26
    
some more info if I do NSString *imageString = [[[[storiesArray objectAtIndex:i] objectForKey: @"image"] stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet:[NSCharacterSet whitespaceAndNewlineCharacterSet]]retain]; and then release I also get a leak but only if I cancelalloperations in the queue. –  zambono Mar 15 '11 at 18:27
    
In the code you posted is no memory leak, unless there is no autorelease pool (which you would see in the log output). My guess is, that the leak is in the imageLoader class. Did you check if all references are released in the dealloc? –  Fönsi Mar 15 '11 at 20:28
    
thanks frenetisch i just added my imageloader class to the question –  zambono Mar 15 '11 at 20:37

Don't track reference counts as a way into understanding memory management. It's only going to confuse you. Things manipulate your objects' reference counts from deep in the framework, and if you watch those numbers jump around for (apparently) no reason, you'll just go insane and post a series of increasingly crazy questions here, which we'll then have to deal with. Believe me--we've seen it before.

So just ignore the reference count number, and make sure you're retaining and releasing objects properly.

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3  
this question was not posted due to a reference count, but due to the warning received in Build and Analyze. As you can see I alloc, and release within the for loop. –  zambono Mar 15 '11 at 16:29

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