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Is there a way to check whether there is any subfolder exist inside a folder. I would like to do this in Perl?

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1  
any subfolders, or one specifically named one? –  Alnitak Mar 15 '11 at 14:35
    
any subfolders, not any specific one –  USer1111 Mar 15 '11 at 14:39

7 Answers 7

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can use the'File::Find' module for this purpose. File::Find processes and scans a directory recursively. Here is the sample code:

use File::Find;
my $DirName = 'dirname' ;

sub has_subdir 
{
    #The path of the file/dir being visited.
    my $subdir = $File::Find::name;

    #Ignore if this is a file.
    return unless -d $subdir;

    #Ignore if $subdir is $Dirname itself.
    return if ( $subdir eq $DirName);

    # if we have reached here, this is a subdirector.
    print "Sub directory found - $subdir\n";
}

#For each file and sub directory in $Dirname, 'find' calls 
#the 'has_subdir' subroutine recursively.
find (\&has_subdir, $DirName);
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super, this is what exactly i was looking for –  USer1111 Mar 16 '11 at 10:54
if(-e "some_folder/some_subfolder") {
   print "folder exists";
}
else {
   print "folder does not exist";
}
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2  
-e checks if a file or dir exists, not only a directory –  Mat Mar 15 '11 at 14:37

Glob through the contents of the directory, and check whether it is a directory with -d.

sub has_subfolder {
  my $directory = shift;
  for ( <$directory/*>, <$directory/.*> ) {
    next if m@/\.\.?$@; # skip . and ..
    return 1 if -d;
  }
  return 0;
}
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1  
I don't believe glob will find hidden directories –  Alnitak Mar 15 '11 at 14:45
    
@Alnitak: You're right; I've updated my answer. –  Tim Mar 15 '11 at 14:48
    
This is however probably inefficient on large directories - will most likely result in traversing the directory twice. –  Alnitak Mar 15 '11 at 14:56
    
Alnitak: That could easily be solved by making the glob <$dir/* $dir/.*> if efficiency is a problem, but I think this is more readable. –  Tim Mar 15 '11 at 14:58
if (grep -d, glob("$folder/*")) {
    print "$folder has subfolder(s)\n";
}  

If you want to deal with directories matching .*, you could do:

if (grep -d && !/\.\.?$/, glob("$folder/.* $folder/*")) {
    print "$folder has subfolder(s)\n";
}  
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1  
I never think to use glob. Good answer. (+1) –  Platinum Azure Mar 15 '11 at 14:41
2  
I don't believe glob will find hidden directories –  Alnitak Mar 15 '11 at 14:45
    
@Alnitak: Good point. (Removing +1 until fixed) –  Platinum Azure Mar 15 '11 at 14:49
    
ok that worked, but how can print those subfolder names? –  USer1111 Mar 15 '11 at 14:56
1  
@User: The if condition is an array containing those names. –  Tim Mar 15 '11 at 14:58
sub hasSubDir {
    my $dir_name = shift;
    opendir my $dir, $dir_name
      or die "Could not open directory $dir_name: $!";
    my @files = readdir($dir);
    closedir($dir);
    for my $file (@files) {
       if($file !~ /\.\.?$/) {
           return 1 if -d $dir/$file;
       }
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
still a -1 - you didn't closedir() before the early exit –  Alnitak Mar 15 '11 at 15:16
    
@Alnitak - doh! Thanks for the catch, edited. –  justkt Mar 15 '11 at 15:29
2  
You don't have to close lexical handles manually. closing happens automatically as soon as the last reference to the handle goes away –  planetp Mar 15 '11 at 18:41
    
@planetp - I didn't know that. IMHO still good practise to cleanup nicely. Someone might port the code to another language which doesn't do it for them. –  Alnitak Mar 17 '11 at 7:35

In order to check if a subfolder exists in a directory (without knowing any names):

my $dir_name = "some_directory";
opendir my $dir, $dir_name
    or die "Could not open directory $dir_name: $!";

my $has_subfolder = grep { -d && !/(^|\/)\.\.?$/ } map { ("$dir_name"||'.')."/$_" } readdir $dir;

In other words, it checks for one or more files in the directory which are themselves directories.

If you want a specific subfolder, just use Geo's answer.

Edit: This is getting silly now, but here's a truly general-purpose answer. :-P Someone else is getting the check mark anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
will this filter out '.' and '..' ? –  Alnitak Mar 15 '11 at 14:43
    
@Alnitak: Good point. Edited. –  Platinum Azure Mar 15 '11 at 14:45
    
don't forget to prepend the directory before the '-d' test, too! –  Alnitak Mar 15 '11 at 14:49
    
@Alnitak: Geez, I'm slipping today. –  Platinum Azure Mar 15 '11 at 14:51
    
but +1 anyway for using opendir/readdir instead of glob –  Alnitak Mar 15 '11 at 14:51

OK, I'm just gonna have to submit my own answer

sub has_subfolder {
  my $dir = shift;
  my $found = 0;
  opendir my $dh, $dir or die "Could not open directory $dir: $!";
  while (my $_ = readdir($dh)) {
    next if (/^\.\.?$/);        # skip '.' and '..'
    my $path = $dir . '/' . $_; # readdir doesn't return the whole path
    if (-d $path) {             # found a dir?  record it, and leave the loop!   
      $found = 1;
      last;    
  }
  closedir($dh);                # make sure we cleanup after!
  return $found;
}

Compared to other answers:

  • finds hidden directories
  • completes as soon as it finds a match
  • doesn't traverse the tree twice (once for normal files, and again for hidden files)

EDIT - I see the requirements just changed (sigh). Fortunately the code above is trivially modified:

sub get_folders {
  my $dir = shift;
  my @found;
  opendir my $dh, $dir or die "Could not open directory $dir: $!";
  while (my $_ = readdir($dh)) {
    next if (/^\.\.?$/);           # skip '.' and '..'
    my $path = $dir . '/' . $_;    # readdir doesn't return the whole path
    push(@found, $_) if (-d $path) # found a dir? record it 
  }
  closedir($dh);                   # make sure we cleanup after!
  return @found;
}
share|improve this answer
    
next if if? (It was a quick fix, hope you don't mind my editing it.) +1 for being a good sport. –  Platinum Azure Mar 15 '11 at 15:10
    
@Platinum good spot :) –  Alnitak Mar 15 '11 at 15:12
1  
All of those points apply to my answer too. You could mention that yours doesn't interpolate glob special characters, though. –  Tim Mar 15 '11 at 15:29
    
two of the three didn't apply in your original answer –  Alnitak Mar 15 '11 at 15:47
    
NEVER assign to $_ without localizing the variable. Place local $_; before each while loop, or better yet local *_; which protects against tied values. Or just write for (readdir $dh) {...} and let perl do all of that for you. –  Eric Strom Mar 17 '11 at 2:19

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