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Was just wondering what's the most efficient way of generating all the cyclic permutations of a list in Python. In either direction. For example, given a list [1, 2, 3, 4], I want to generate either:

[[1, 2, 3, 4],
 [4, 1, 2, 3],
 [3, 4, 1, 2],
 [2, 3, 4, 1]]

where the next permutation is generated by moving the last element to the front, or:

[[1, 2, 3, 4],
 [2, 3, 4, 1],
 [3, 4, 1, 2],
 [4, 1, 2, 3]]

where the next permutation is generated by moving the first element to the back.

The second case is slightly more interesting to me because it results in a reduced Latin square (the first case also gives a Latin square, just not reduced), which is what I'm trying to use to do experimental block design. It actually isn't that different from the first case since they're just re-orderings of each other, but order does still matter.

The current implementation I have for the first case is:

def gen_latin_square(mylist):
    tmplist = mylist[:]
    latin_square = []
    for i in range(len(mylist)):
        latin_square.append(tmplist[:])
        tmplist = [tmplist.pop()] + tmplist
    return latin_square

For the second case its:

def gen_latin_square(mylist):
    tmplist = mylist[:]
    latin_square = []
    for i in range(len(mylist)):
        latin_square.append(tmplist[:])
        tmplist = tmplist[1:] + [tmplist[0]]
    return latin_square

The first case seems like it should be reasonably efficient to me, since it uses pop(), but you can't do that in the second case, so I'd like to hear ideas about how to do this more efficiently. Maybe there's something in itertools that will help? Or maybe a double-ended queue for the second case?

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Your implementation don't work -- they are adding list (ints) and lists, which is impossible. Furthermore, they are appending the same list instance in each iteration, so you will end up with a square that consists of n times the same line. –  Sven Marnach Mar 15 '11 at 15:33
    
Whoops, missed out on that, thanks. Didn't actually test the code :p –  ztangent Mar 15 '11 at 15:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

For the first part, the most concise way probably is

a = [1, 2, 3, 4]
n = len(a)
[[a[i - j] for i in range(n)] for j in range(n)]
# [[1, 2, 3, 4], [4, 1, 2, 3], [3, 4, 1, 2], [2, 3, 4, 1]]

and for the second part

[[a[i - j] for i in range(n)] for j in range(n, 0, -1)]
# [[1, 2, 3, 4], [2, 3, 4, 1], [3, 4, 1, 2], [4, 1, 2, 3]]

These should also be much more efficient than your code, though I did not do any timings.

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Wow, didn't think you could do this using list comprehensions! Perhaps I should have thought harder. Props for not having to use any extra modules. –  ztangent Mar 15 '11 at 15:51

You can use collections.deque:

from collections import deque

g = deque([1, 2, 3, 4])

for i in range(len(g)):
    print list(g) #or do anything with permutation
    g.rotate(1) #for right rotation
    #or g.rotate(-1) for left rotation

It prints:

 [1, 2, 3, 4]
 [4, 1, 2, 3]
 [3, 4, 1, 2]
 [2, 3, 4, 1]

To change it for left rotation just replace g.rotate(1) with g.rotate(-1).

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That rotate method is pretty cool. Never knew that dequeues could do that. Then again, I should probably have read the documentation thoroughly before asking. –  ztangent Mar 15 '11 at 15:54
    
As it is double-ended queue, rotate operation is probably efficiently implemented. –  Maciej Ziarko Mar 15 '11 at 16:01
    
And documentations are indeed our best friends. :) –  Maciej Ziarko Mar 15 '11 at 16:04

Using itertools to avoid indexing:

x = itertools.cycle(a)
[[x.next() for i in a] for j in a]
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