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I am from PHP and quick learn OOP Python base PHP 's knowledge for example I have a class

<?php
class Cat{
    private $name;
    private $age;
    private $color;

    public function getName()
    {
        return $this->name;
    }

    public function setName($value)
    {
        $this->name = $value;
    }

    public function getAge()
    {
        return $this->age;
    }

    public function setAge($value)
    {
        $this->age = $value;
    }

    public function getColor()
    {
        return $this->color;
    }

    public function setColor($value)
    {
        $this->color = $value;
    }

}
?>

What is equivalence to python OOP code?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

An exact equivalent would be this:

class Cat(object):
    def __init__(self, name...):
        self.__name = name # __ make the var private
        ...

    def getName(self):
        return self.__name

    def setName(self, name):
        self.__name = name

    ...

It will work, but you would never do that in Python. Here is why:

  • Nothing is really private in Python, and you can always bypass restrictions using some tricks in this language. So you usually value more communication, doc and API that enforcing a behaviour.
  • Accessing directly attribute is perfectly fine in Python. If you don't something special while getting or setting, then you don't write getters and setters. The best Python libs do this.
  • You have something called 'properties' allowing you to change your mind after the fact. If in 1 month, you decide to do something while getting and setting a var, you can do it without changing you API.

Here is how you would to it in proper Python:

class Cat(object):
    def __init__(self, name):
        self.name = name

c = Cat('billy')
print c.name
# billy
c.name = 'kit'
print c.name
# kit

Now, what if suddenly you want to change your mind and ensure the name is always capitalize on when you store it ? You just add a property:

class Cat(object):

    def __init__(self, name):
        self._name = name # '_' is just a convention and does nothing

    @property # when you do cat.name, it will call this function
    def name(self):
        return self._name

    @name.setter # when you do cat.name = x, it will call this function
    def name(self, name):
        """ Make the name uppercase when setting it """
        self._name = name.upper()

The code change, but from outside, it looks exactly the same:

c = Cat('billy')
print c.name
# BILLY
c.name = 'kit'
print c.name
# KIT

What are the main benefits?

  • You don't have to write getter and setter most of the time, it same times and make the code shorter, hence easier to read.
  • If you change your mind, you can always write ONE getter/setter. Only the one you need, not all the other ones. The API keeps looking consistent.
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for great example of properties. – delnan Mar 15 '11 at 19:28
    
great explanation,thanks – steve Mar 16 '11 at 7:47
class Cat(object):
    def __init__(self, name, age, color):
        self.name = name
        self.age = age
        self.color = color

No, I'm not joking.

  1. Cut that getter/setter stuff, we have properties for a reason.
  2. If you're going to have an attribute, you better have it all the time (i.e. from creation onward), or AttributeErrors ensue. Even though PHP allows you to silence those (Python doesn't), they're a "code smell" in all languages.
  3. In Python 2.x, you need to inherit from object (directly or indirectly) - otherwise, you get one of those nasty relicts from the past, old-style classes. Just don't bother with it. In Python 3, you don't need that boilerplate though (old-style classes are gone, everything inherits object if nothing else).
  4. And this is important: You won't learn Python (or any other language) by comparing a few short snippets. Read a tutorial, some real code and Python questions on SO. Also, practice practice practice and have the code reviewed.
share|improve this answer
    
very ,shorter than PHP code. – steve Mar 15 '11 at 17:01
    
Old style class here. – cmaynard Mar 15 '11 at 17:02
    
@kramthegram: Not anymore. The original version had a syntax error (missing colon) as well. – delnan Mar 15 '11 at 17:03
    
thanks for your tips.(point 4). – steve Mar 16 '11 at 7:49
class Cat(object):
   def __init__(self, name, age, color):
        self.name = name
        self.age = age
        self.color = color

Setters and getters are not usually used in Python; you can use property if you really need to do something fancy in them, so the interface won't ever need to change. Since the interface won't have to change if you decide to add 5 to every value you set, there's no need to type out the extra functions.

Incidentally, this isn't really OOP. It's just a C struct spelled out in Python. If you want to add OOP-style methods for, say, petting your cat, you can. Just add this to the class:

def pet(self):
    # Do whatever petting does to a cat.
    pass
share|improve this answer
    
object or Object ? – ypercubeᵀᴹ Mar 15 '11 at 17:02
    
__getattr__, __getattribute__ and __setattr__ are more similar to PHP's __get and __set. In Python, we have properties to make the get/set identical to plain old attribute access/assignment to the outside. – delnan Mar 15 '11 at 17:03
    
@delnan: Whoops, you're right. I mixed the property up with __getattr__. I guess I don't use them very often. Fixed. – nmichaels Mar 15 '11 at 17:06
    
@ypercube: object. – nmichaels Mar 15 '11 at 17:07

Everyone has good answers, but I thought I'd include an example of the built-in property function.

class Cat(object):
    def __init__(sef, name, age, color):
        self._name = name
        self._age = age
        self._color = color

    def get_name(self):
        return self._name

    def set_name(self, value):
        self._name = value

    def get_age(self):
        return self._age    

    def set_age(self, value):
        self._age = value

    def get_color(self):
        return self._color

    def set_color(self, value):
        self._color = value

    name = property(get_name, set_name)
    age = property(get_age, set_age)
    color = property(get_color, set_color)
share|improve this answer
    
Using property as a decorator is actually even better. Also, you have syntax errors (colons missing) and slipped in a old-style class (is this the collective fail question? I did that too!). See ideone.com/akR5f for an example. – delnan Mar 15 '11 at 17:13
    
You shouldn't do this unless there's an important, compelling reason to do so... – chmullig Mar 15 '11 at 17:18
    
The problem is you shouldn't use the same name for property and variable. It will cause infinite loop. Use member name like self._name instead. – Kabie Mar 15 '11 at 17:23
    
@delnan After reading up on the class changes I now am shaking my head at my old crappy python code. Also: I fixed my obvious errors. – Greg Buehler Mar 15 '11 at 18:07
    
I'm not quite sure why my answer is better than @e-satis's... – Greg Buehler Mar 16 '11 at 13:12

Your code is more like this.

However, unless you need customized setter and getter, don't do this.

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