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suppose you have the code

template <template<class> class BaseType>
class EST16
    : public BaseType<int>
{
public:
    EST16(double d) 
    {
    }
};

template <class T>
class SCEST
{
    T y;
};
typedef EST16<SCEST> EST16_SC;
class Child
    : public EST16_SC
{
public:
    Child()
        : EST16_SC(1.0)
    {
    }

};



class NotWorkingChild
    : public EST16<SCEST>
{
public:
    NotWorkingChild()
        : EST16<SCEST>(1.0)
    {
    }

};



TEST(TemplateTest, TestInstantiate)
{
    Child child;
    NotWorkingChild notWorkingChild; 
}

Child and NotWorkingChild differ only by the typedef. In GCC both compile, in Visual Studio the constructor of NotWorkingChild produces the following error:

2>..\..\..\src\itenav\test\SCKFErrorStateTest.cpp(43) : error C3200: 'SCEST<T>' : invalid template argument for template parameter 'BaseType', expected a class template
2>        with
2>        [
2>            T=int
2>        ]

Can you explain why this is the case? Is there a better portable solution than the typedef?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
Have you written any code that actually instantiates and uses the template classes? By that I mean in, say, main. One thing that might be happening is that VCC tests the instantiation when seeing the typedef, while GCC doesn't bother until one of your child classes is actually used. If that's true, then you would get errors in GCC as well, as soon as you actually write code that uses one of the child class templates. – phooji Mar 15 '11 at 17:09
    
Yes, I did. The TEST macro creates a Google Test that actually gets called from main(). – Philipp Mar 15 '11 at 17:25
    
Sorry -- the TEST macro was just after my scrolling cutoff, so I missed it. I'm not 100% why this fails, but I've posted an alternative approach below that should be more portable across compilers. It is also more readable, in my humble opinion :) – phooji Mar 15 '11 at 17:39
up vote 9 down vote accepted

The error message is because NotWorkingChild derives (indirectly) from SCEST<int>, which makes SCEST inside the scope of NotWorkingChild refer to the class SCEST<int>, instead of the template. MSVC is correct to reject this, and GCC4.5 should reject this too (GCC4.5 has more correct injected class name lookup).

Here is a solution that might work for both compilers

class NotWorkingChild
    : public EST16<SCEST>
{
public:
    NotWorkingChild()
        : EST16< ::SCEST >(1.0)
    {
    }

};

Notice that we use the scope resolution operator and need to put a space before :: (the token <: would otherwise be taken as a digraph).


Breaking News: C++0x will make the above work even if you do EST16<SCEST>. The reason is, that it says that if the injected class name is passed to a template template parameter, the injected class name is treated as a template, instead of as a type. Therefor, for C++0x, GCC would be the compiler doing it correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
Seems VS "14" CTP still requires the scope resolution operator. – Jens Åkerblom Nov 29 '14 at 18:37

It compiles on VS if you change the initialiser to just refer to the template class name, EST16. I.e.:

class NotWorkingChild : public EST16<SCEST>
{
public:
    NotWorkingChild()
        : EST16(1.0)
    {
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
that's correct, but I am looking for a portable solution and this does not compile with GCC :-( – Philipp Mar 15 '11 at 18:42

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