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I'm reading the Pro MVC 2 book, and there is an example of creating an extension method for the HtmlHelper class.

Here the code example:

public static MvcHtmlString PageLinks(this HtmlHelper html, PagingInfo pagingInfo, Func<int,string> pageUrl)
{
    //Magic here.
}

And here is an example usage:

[Test]
public void Can_Generate_Links_To_Other_Pages()
{
    //Arrange: We're going to extend the Html helper class.
    //It doesn't matter if the variable we use is null            
    HtmlHelper html = null;

    PagingInfo pagingInfo = PagingInfo(){
        CurrentPage = 2,
        TotalItems = 28,
        ItemsPerPage = 10
    };

    Func<int, String> pageUrl = i => "Page" + i;

    //Act: Here's how it should format the links.
    MvcHtmlString result = html.PageLinks(pagingInfo, pageUrl);

    //Assert:
    result.ToString().ShouldEqual(@"<a href=""Page1"">1</a><a href=""Page2"">2</a><a href=""Page3"">3</a>")           

}

Edit: Removed part that confused the point of this question.

The question is: Why is the example using Func? When should I use it? What is Func?

Thanks!

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Mainly, I'd like to know what the Func<int, String> pageUrl = i => "Page1" + i; line is doing. –  delete Mar 15 '11 at 17:25
    
I don't understand. Func<T, T> has nothing to do with extension methods. What are you asking? –  BoltClock Mar 15 '11 at 17:26
    
You mean the declaration of PageLinks? The first parameter is this, i.e. it is an extension method. That parameter gets bound to the html object in the call. –  Pete Mar 15 '11 at 17:26
1  
NOTE: Please disregard the extension method bit, I wrote the wrong question. I mainly want to learn about what Func is, and why this example chose to use it. Also, when I should use it. I provided the example, only for context purposes. –  delete Mar 15 '11 at 17:29
    
Note: The reference to extension methods is purely because in the MVC book Func is first used in the chapter which introduces them. –  Poldie Mar 10 '13 at 17:10
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8 Answers

up vote 79 down vote accepted

A Func<int, string> like

Func<int, String> pageUrl = i => "Page" + i;

is a delegate accepting int as its sole parameter and returning a string. In this example, it accepts an int parameter with name i and returns the string "Page" + i which just concatenates a standard string representation of i to the string "Page".

In general, Func<TSource, TResult> accepts one parameter that is of type TSource and returns a parameter of type TResult. For example,

Func<string, string> toUpper = s => s.ToUpper();

then you can say

string upper = toUpper("hello, world!");

or

Func<DateTime, int> month = d => d.Month;

so you can say

int m = month(new DateTime(3, 15, 2011));
share|improve this answer
    
Ahhhhh. Something clicked. Thanks for the Func explanation. I really understand what it's doing now. :D –  delete Mar 15 '11 at 17:33
2  
Really helpful thanks –  unique Feb 5 '13 at 4:56
    
Great explanation, thank you! –  Finnayra Oct 27 '13 at 15:00
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Func<int, String> means a callback method that takes an int parameter and returns a String as the result.

The following expression, which is known as a lambda expression:

Func<int, String> pageUrl = i => "Page" + i;

expands to something like this:

Func<int, String> pageUrl = delegate(int i)
{
    return "Page" + i;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for expanding the lambda into the corresponding delegate. –  cod3monk3y Sep 2 '13 at 7:20
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The Func<int, string> line that you are inquiring about is known as a lambda expression.

Func<int, String> pageUrl = i => "Page" + i;

This line can be described as a function that takes an int parameter (i) and returns a string "Page" + i;

It can be re-written as:

delegate(int i)
{
    return "Page" + i;
}
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Is it possible to overload delegates, say if the input was a generic T where T : class? –  Travis J Apr 6 '13 at 20:45
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Because the PageLinks method is an Extension Method.

In extension method, the first parameter starts with this keyword to indicate that it is an Extension method on the type represented by the first parameter.

The Func<T1, T2> is a delegate which represents a transformation from type T1 to type T2. So basically, your PageLinks method will apply that transformation to int to produce a string.

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1  
Ok - but what about the Func part? –  delete Mar 15 '11 at 17:27
    
See my answer for link to Func. –  individual101101 Mar 15 '11 at 17:27
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Func<T, TResult>: Encapsulates a method that has one parameter and returns a value of the type specified by the TResult parameter. See this page for more details and examples. :-)

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I have implemented a where() extension method using Func please have a look...

public static IEnumerable<Tsource> Where<Tsource> ( this IEnumerable<Tsource> a , Func<Tsource , bool> Method )
{

    foreach ( var data in a )
    {
        //If the lambda Expression(delegate) returns "true" Then return the Data. (use 'yield' for deferred return)
        if ( Method.Invoke ( data ) )
        {
            yield return data;
        }
    }
}

You can use it like,

        foreach ( var item in Emps.Where ( e => e.Name == "Shiv" ).Select ( e1 => e1.Name ) )
        {
            Console.WriteLine ( item );
        }
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Have a blog post on this. Using Func you can resolve some of functional discrepancy. Read here.

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I'm not knowledgeable about C# but, I'm under the impression that the declaration declares the first parameter as "this".

So in the case of your execution of this method, the html.PageLinks(pagingInfo, pageUrl) really is PageLinks(html, pagingInfo, pageUrl) underneath.

share|improve this answer
1  
Nice guess, but no. It means that this is the definition of an extension method, and that the type after the word 'this' is the type being extended. –  Poldie Mar 10 '13 at 17:13
    
Thanks for the clarification! –  Dave G Mar 11 '13 at 11:33
3  
-1 this is a guess, inaccurate, and not relevant to the question about Func<T,T> –  cod3monk3y Sep 2 '13 at 7:23
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