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I have a class in which I have an enumeration, defined like this:

class X
   {
   public:
      enum Direction {DIR_LEFT, DIR_RIGHT};
   };

Now I want this enumeration to be reused in another class, like this:

class Y
   {
   public:
      typedef X::Direction Direction;
   };

As expected, using Y::Direction works correctly, e.g.:

void myFunction (Y::Direction dir)
{
}

But the values within the enumeration does not seem to be 'copied' together with the typedef. If I write the following, I get compilation errors:

myFunction (Y::DIR_LEFT);

Instead, I have to refer to the original place of the enumeration again, like this:

myFunction (X::DIR_LEFT);

Which defeats my purpose of typdefing the enumeration.

The only solution I see is to move the enumeration out of class X, and putting it in another class (e.g. MyEnums), so it can be reused by X and Y (although they should still use MyEnums::DIR_LEFT and MyEnums::DIR_RIGHT), but at least the code does not depend on class X anymore.

Why are the enumeration values itself no exposed via the typedef?

Are there any other patterns to manage enumerations in different classes?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Unfortunately C++ doesn't introduce a new scope with an enum although C++0x is improving things.

Practically this means that you can't typedef an enum and get the enumerated values as well.

What you can do is use a nested struct with the name you want for the enum and typedef THAT.

class X
{
public:
    struct Direction { enum EnumType {LEFT, RIGHT}; };
};

class Y
{
public:
    typedef X::Direction Direction;
};

Now you can do: myFunction (Y::Direction::LEFT);

The purpose of the nested struct is to create a "fake" scope to holld both the enum name and its values.

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3  
You probably should remove the DIR_ prefix because it was an artificial "poor man's namespace": struct Direction {enum {LEFT, RIGHT};}; - just a bit dirtier than the C++0x syntax enum class Direction {LEFT, RIGHT}; –  anatolyg Mar 15 '11 at 18:01
    
@anatolyg Indeed that's a good idea, I made that change. –  Mark B Mar 15 '11 at 18:19

If the original declaration:

    class X
    {
    public:
      enum Direction {DIR_LEFT, DIR_RIGHT};
    };

is embedded in a large legacy code-base, then we might want a solution that does not change any existing uses of X::Direction. In that case, the rather ugly:

    class Y
    {
    public:
       typedef enum X::Direction Direction;
       static const enum X::Direction DIR_LEFT = X:DIR_LEFT;
       static const enum X::Direction DIR_RIGHT = X:DIR_RIGHT;
    }

works...

Definitely not recommended for new code, however!

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Anything shared by more than one class should be factored outside of the classes and perhaps into a parent class.

direction.hpp:

#ifndef DIRECTION_HPP
enum Direction {DIR_LEFT, DIR_RIGHT};
#endif

x.hpp:

#ifndef X_HPP
#include "direction.hpp"

class X
{
  Direction dir;
};
#endif // X_HPP

y.hpp

#ifndef Y_HPP
#include "direction.hpp"

class Y
{
  Direction dir;
};
#endif // Y_HPP
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Aren't you now polluting the global namespace with your enum? The OP's version didn't have this problem. –  JBentley Oct 8 '13 at 16:46

Here is my understanding of how enums work in C++. (Or at least my observed behaviour of enums in Microsoft Visual C++.)

The enum keyword does not create a scope the same way that classes do.

The full name then for your enum 'Direction', is X::Direction. The values within that enum are still part of the class scope, so they are X::DIR_LEFT and X::DIR_RIGHT.

When you typedef the enum in another class, this does not change the scope of the values of the enum.

I suggest you put the enum inside a namespace in a header file if you want to share it in multiple locations.

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If you want the enum values to be members of both classes, the solution is to define a separate class with the enum, and inherit from it, e.g.:

class MyEnums
{
protected:
    ~MyEnums() {} //  Prevent delete through pointer to this class
public:
    enum Direction
    {
        DIR_LEFT,
        DIR_RIGHT
    };
};

class X : public MyEnums
{
    // ...
};

class Y : public MyEnums
{
    // ...
};

Users will see X::Direction, X::DIR_LEFT and Y::Direction, Y::DIR_LEFT. Of course, they'll still be able to pass a Y::DIR_LEFT to a function expecting an X::Direction; to prevent that, make MyEnums a template, with the derived class as the template argument.

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3  
it certainly looks like a misuse of inheritance :/ –  Matthieu M. Mar 15 '11 at 18:09
    
@Matthieu M. For what definition of "misuse"? It's a more or less standard technique in C++ to use inheritance to share declarations, see std::iterator, for example. –  James Kanze Mar 15 '11 at 19:20
    
it's not because the standard does it that it's necessarily good. The protected destructor should protect from a number of issues, but still it's "weird", in the sense that I can now pass polymophically classes that are quite unrelated. The typedef seems a superior alternative here. –  Matthieu M. Mar 16 '11 at 7:33
    
You can pass polymorphically types that are actually unrelated, but would you? I've never seen anyone passing around references to std::iterator, and I don't see why this would be any different. (I'm not sure that the typedef solution isn't superior, but it doesn't have the same effect. You still can't write X::DIR_LEFT, for example.) –  James Kanze Mar 16 '11 at 13:55
    
yes, the absence of scoping of traditional enums prevent uniform syntax. –  Matthieu M. Mar 16 '11 at 14:02

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