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what I'm after is something I can feed a number into and it will return the highest order bit. I'm sure there's a simple way. Below is an example output (left is the input)

1 -> 1
2 -> 2
3 -> 2
4 -> 4
5 -> 4
6 -> 4
7 -> 4
8 -> 8
9 -> 8
...
63 -> 32
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16  
When I was at school 10 years ago I did it myself, if I go back I'll be sure to keep it up. Maybe try to be more constructive next time. –  Harley Holcombe Feb 9 '09 at 22:23

12 Answers 12

up vote 14 down vote accepted

This should do the trick.

int hob (int num)
{
    if (!num)
    	return 0;

    int ret = 1;

    while (num >>= 1)
    	ret <<= 1;

    return ret;
}

hob(1234) returns 1024
hob(1024) returns 1024
hob(1023) returns 512

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To make it work with zeros just add: while (num >>= 1 && num) –  Paul Hargreaves Sep 10 '08 at 6:21
    
Actually you need an if to check for zero. Since ret starts at 1 and grows, this algorithm won't make it hit 0, the answer for the input of 0. –  Kyle Cronin Sep 10 '08 at 14:39
3  
My answer is better. No loops! –  erickson Sep 20 '08 at 0:01
    
a good compiler will unroll loops for performance. If it actually does perform faster w/o the loop. –  davenpcj Feb 21 '12 at 17:09
1  
For GCC, the better function is __builtin_clz(v) -- it returns the number of leading (binary) zeros, and hence you can get the most significant bit position by 32-clz(num) (or 64-clzll(num) for 64 bit) –  Soren Oct 17 '13 at 16:56

From Hacker's Delight:

int hibit(unsigned int n) {
    n |= (n >>  1);
    n |= (n >>  2);
    n |= (n >>  4);
    n |= (n >>  8);
    n |= (n >> 16);
    return n - (n >> 1);
}

This version is for 32-bit ints, but the logic can be extended for 64-bits or higher.

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isn't it supposed to be a bit more efficient to use XOR in the last line? n ^ (n >> 1) –  alveko May 28 '13 at 15:48

like obfuscated code? Try this:

1 << ( int) log2( x)

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1  
I love this solution, but it's just a little too obfuscated. Still gets a vote as the most compact solution. –  Harley Holcombe Sep 11 '08 at 0:09
6  
If you want to pawn the job off on the FPU, sure. :) –  Jeffrey Hantin Jan 23 '09 at 3:52
4  
Mathematically correct, but this could be much slower than bitwise operations. –  mateusza Feb 2 '11 at 12:36
1  
It is possible to find log2 using bitwise, see my answer –  bobobobo Sep 11 '12 at 19:10
1  
If you cast it to double first, the exponent part of the number readily tells you the order. –  Calmarius Sep 20 '13 at 13:35

fls bottoms out to a hardware instruction on many architectures. I suspect this is probably the simplest, fastest way of doing it.

1<<(fls(input)-1)
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1  
Clearly the best answer. I wonder why all those websites like bit twiddling hacks, who focus so much on reducing the number of operations for this kind of problems, don't even mention this. –  Cimbali Mar 4 at 19:07

The linux kernel has a number of handy bitops like this, coded in the most efficient way for a number of architectures. You can find generic versions in include/asm-generic/bitops/fls.h (and friends), but see also include/asm-x86/bitops.h for a definition using inline assembly if speed of is the essence, and portability is not.

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This can easily be solved with existing library calls.

int highestBit(int v){
  return ffs(v) << 1;
}

The Linux man page gives more details on this function and its counterparts for other input types.

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3  
Actually, ffs returns the lowest order bit. –  Jivlain Mar 19 '12 at 1:56
1  
Use (64-__builtin_clzll(v)) instead.... –  Soren Oct 17 '13 at 16:53

A fast way to do this is via a look-up table. For a 32-bit input, and an 8-bit look-up table, in only requires 4 iterations:

int highest_order_bit(int x)
{
    static const int msb_lut[256] =
        {
            0, 0, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, // 0000_0000 - 0000_0111
            3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, // 0000_1000 - 0000_1111
            4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, // 0001_0000 - 0001_0111
            4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, // 0001_1000 - 0001_1111
            5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, // 0010_0000 - 0010_0111
            5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, // 0010_1000 - 0010_1111
            5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, // 0011_0000 - 0011_0111
            5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, // 0011_1000 - 0011_1111

            6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, // 0100_0000 - 0100_0111
            6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, // 0100_1000 - 0100_1111
            6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, // 0101_0000 - 0101_0111
            6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, // 0101_1000 - 0101_1111
            6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, // 0110_0000 - 0110_0111
            6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, // 0110_1000 - 0110_1111
            6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, // 0111_0000 - 0111_0111
            6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, // 0111_1000 - 0111_1111

            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1000_0000 - 1000_0111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1000_1000 - 1000_1111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1001_0000 - 1001_0111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1001_1000 - 1001_1111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1010_0000 - 1010_0111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1010_1000 - 1010_1111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1011_0000 - 1011_0111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1011_1000 - 1011_1111

            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1100_0000 - 1100_0111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1100_1000 - 1100_1111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1101_0000 - 1101_0111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1101_1000 - 1101_1111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1110_0000 - 1110_0111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1110_1000 - 1110_1111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1111_0000 - 1111_0111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1111_1000 - 1111_1111
        };

    int byte;
    int byte_cnt;

    for (byte_cnt = 3; byte_cnt >= 0; byte_cnt--)
    {
        byte = (x >> (byte_cnt * 8)) & 0xff;
        if (byte != 0)
        {
            return msb_lut[byte] + (byte_cnt * 8);
        }
    }

    return -1;
}
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4  
fastest to execute, but not to type ;) –  kenny Sep 21 '09 at 15:12
    
erickson's answer is faster... It uses less memory, so it's more cache efficient. –  Calmarius Sep 20 '13 at 13:39

Continually remove the low order bit comes to mind...

int highest_order_bit( int x )
{
    int y = x;
    do { 
        x = y;
        y = x & (x-1); //remove low order bit
    }
    while( y != 0 );
    return x;
}
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// Note doesn't cover the case of 0 (0 returns 1)
inline unsigned int hibit( unsigned int x )
{
  unsigned int log2Val = 0 ;
  while( x>>=1 ) log2Val++;  // eg x=63 (111111), log2Val=5
  return 1 << log2Val ; // finds 2^5=32
}
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There is a solution that works in log2(log2(n)) calls and needs log2(log2(n)) extra space for recursion. (There is another one that does not require extra space and works in (log2(log2(n)))^2 ). It is basically looking for the binary expansion of the exponent. The result is actually number of digits in a binary expansion but that is easy to convert to the highest bit value. Cannot be quicker! :)

void nextLevel(int* n, int r, int* dig, int d)
{
    r=r*r;

    if(*n>=r)
    {
        d = 2 * d;
        nextLevel(n,r,dig,d);

        if(*n>=r)
        {
            *n=*n/r;
            *dig += d;
        }
    }
}

main()
{
    int m=789;
    int n=m;

    int r = 2;
    int dig = 1;
    int d = 1;

    nextLevel(&n, r, &dig, d); 

    if(m==0) printf("highest bit value %d", 0 );
    else
    {
     if (n>=2) dig++; 
     printf("highest bit value %d", 0x01 << (dig-1) );
    }

}
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I would assume that you are working on an x86 architecture however it is important to understand the endian of the platform you are running when handling bitwise operations. Take a look at this article for a better idea: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endianness

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1  
Endianness only matters when considering the byte ordering in memory. Doing bit operations on the processor is not endian-specific. There are ways that the question could be answered that are endian-specific, but none have appeared yet. –  Commodore Jaeger Sep 10 '08 at 0:23

Why not simply do this:

int HiBit(int num){ return (num & 0x80000000) >> 31; }
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2  
This does not work, it does get any of the OP-provided examples correct. –  Pascal Cuoq Jul 23 '12 at 19:44
    
That tests if the highest bit in a 32 bit integer is set, not what was required. –  Wieser Software Ltd Apr 30 at 9:29

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