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I saw it suggested on a blog that the following was a reasonable way to do a "reverse-lookup" using the getCode(int) in a Java enum:

public enum Status {
    WAITING(0),
    READY(1),
    SKIPPED(-1),
    COMPLETED(5);

    private static final Map<Integer,Status> lookup 
            = new HashMap<Integer,Status>();

    static {
        for(Status s : EnumSet.allOf(Status.class))
            lookup.put(s.getCode(), s);
    }

    private int code;

    private Status(int code) {
        this.code = code;
    }

    public int getCode() { return code; }

    public static Status get(int code) { 
        return lookup.get(code); 
    }
}

To me, the static map and the static initializer both look like a bad idea, and my first thought would be to code the lookup as so:

public enum Status {
    WAITING(0),
    READY(1),
    SKIPPED(-1),
    COMPLETED(5);

    private int code;

    private Status(int code) {
        this.code = code;
    }

    public int getCode() { return code; }

    public static Status get(int code) { 
        for(Status s : values()) {
            if(s.code == code) return s;
        }
        return null;
    }
}

Are there any obvious problems with either method, and is there a recommended way to implement this kind of lookup?

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Btw, for you Map building loop you could have done for(Status s : values()) lookup.put(s.code, s); –  Peter Lawrey Mar 15 '11 at 19:40
4  
Is there something wrong with using Enum.valueOf()? Are you unable to store Strings? –  Jonathan Mar 15 '11 at 20:06

5 Answers 5

Though it has higher overhead, the static map is nice because it offers constant-time lookup by code. Your implementation's lookup time increases linearly with the number of elements in the enum. For small enums, this simply will not contribute significantly.

One issue with both implementations (and, arguably, with Java enums in general) is that there's really a hidden extra value that a Status can take on: null. Depending on the rules of the business logic, it may make sense to return an actual enum value, or throw an Exception, when the lookup "fails."

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2  
@Matt, I believe both ways are constant time lookup because there is a constant number of items in the Map. –  jjnguy Mar 15 '11 at 18:36
4  
@jinguy, they might both be "constant" time operations, but the constant in each operation is different. One is the time to find a value in a hashtable, the other is the time required to loop through a variable (but constant at runtime) array of values. If you had one million values in this enum (not practical, but just an example) then you would prefer the map-lookup option. –  matt b Mar 15 '11 at 18:42
3  
@jjnguy: stating that an algorithm is O(n) does not imply that n can change at runtime. What if this performed an analogous lookup on an immutable (therefore fixed-at-runtime) list? That would absolutely be an O(n) algorithm, where n is the size of the list. –  Matt Ball Mar 15 '11 at 18:43
5  
@jjnguy have a look at rob-bell.net/2009/06/a-beginners-guide-to-big-o-notation O(1) is "an algorithm that will always execute in the same time (or space) regardless of the size of the input data set." whereas O(N) is "an algorithm whose performance will grow linearly and in direct proportion to the size of the input data set" so while in this case the size of the data set doesn't change from run to run (why I think you consider it 'constant'), the performance of the algorithm is still based on the size of the input data set (in this case, the number of entries in the enum) –  digitaljoel Mar 15 '11 at 18:55
2  
I think in this case we should go and compare the absolute space and time characteristics for real-world enum sizes, not for N → ∞. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 15 '11 at 18:58

Here is an alternative which may be even a bit faster:

public enum Status {
    WAITING(0),
    READY(1),
    SKIPPED(-1),
    COMPLETED(5);

    private int code;

    private Status(int code) {
        this.code = code;
    }

    public int getCode() { return code; }

    public static Status get(int code) {
        switch(code) {
            case  0: return WAITING;
            case  1: return READY;
            case -1: return SKIPPED;
            case  5: return COMPLETED;
        }
        return null;
    }
}

Of course, this is not really maintainable if you want to be able to add more constants later.

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This is exactly the same as looping through values() at runtime as far as speed goes. –  jjnguy Mar 15 '11 at 18:43
5  
Not exactly the same, the switch version could use a lookup table to jump directly to the right code instead of doing a series of tests: artima.com/underthehood/flowP.html –  Dan Berindei Mar 15 '11 at 18:51
7  
@jjnguy: No, the compiler can optimize this switch to use a binary search, or a lookup table (depending on the numbers). And you don't need to create and populate the values() array before (which alone would make this variant O(n)). Of course, now the method is longer, so loading it takes longer. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 15 '11 at 18:54
    
@Dan, it could, but does it? –  jjnguy Mar 15 '11 at 18:55
1  
But this is an absolutely inacceptable solution in terms of clean code. With this solution you got two different places where the id is mapped to the enum value, so there can be bugs when the mappings differ! –  Zordid Mar 27 '13 at 12:25

Maps.uniqueIndex from Google's Guava is quite handy for building lookup maps.

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Obviously the map will provide constant time lookup whereas the loop won't. In a typical enum with few values, I don't see a problem with the traversal lookup.

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Both ways are perfectly valid. And they have technically the same Big-Oh running time.

However, if you save all of the values to a Map first, you save the time it takes to iterate through the set each time you want to do a lookup. So, I think that the static map and initializer are a slightly better way to go.

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3  
As the number of enum constants is and constant, everything is O(1) :-) –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 15 '11 at 18:36
6  
Nah, the linear lookup runs in linear time O(n) instead of O(1) for the HashMap. On the other hand, n is 4... –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Mar 15 '11 at 18:37
    
@Paulo, great. That's what I thought. –  jjnguy Mar 15 '11 at 18:37
3  
@jjnguy: The thing is, an increase in the number of constants is a linear increase in the runtime of the lookup, making the lookup O(N). That the number of constants doesn't change at runtime is immaterial. –  ColinD Mar 15 '11 at 19:12
2  
@jjnguy: that comment is meaningless. N is the number of items. Period. –  EJP Mar 16 '11 at 0:56

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