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How can I authorise a client (in this case a client is an application) to use a web service within .NET,

For example: I want a 3rd pary application to call a method but not allow other applications within the network to call this method.

I want to avoid transport layer authorisation and use message based authorisation.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should take a look at the WS-Security and WS-Policy standards. The best way is to have the client application sign all requests (with a private key) and check this signature on the server side.

We use a setup like this, with the following WS-Policy definitions in the WSDL:

<!--Endpoint Policy-->
<wsp:Policy wsu:Id="Endpoint_policy"
            xmlns:wsp="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2004/09/policy"
            xmlns:wsu="http://docs.oasis-open.org/wss/2004/01/oasis-200401-wss-wssecurity-utility-1.0.xsd">
  <wsp:ExactlyOne>
    <wsp:All>

      <sp:AsymmetricBinding
         xmlns:sp="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2005/07/securitypolicy">
        <wsp:Policy>
          <sp:InitiatorToken>
            <wsp:Policy>
              <sp:X509Token
                 sp:IncludeToken="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2005/07/securitypolicy/IncludeToken/AlwaysToRecipient">
                <wsp:Policy>
                  <sp:WssX509V3Token10 />
                </wsp:Policy>
              </sp:X509Token>
            </wsp:Policy>
          </sp:InitiatorToken>

          <sp:RecipientToken>
            <wsp:Policy>
              <sp:X509Token
                 sp:IncludeToken="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2005/07/securitypolicy/IncludeToken/Never">
                <wsp:Policy>
                  <sp:WssX509V3Token10 />
                </wsp:Policy>
              </sp:X509Token>
            </wsp:Policy>
          </sp:RecipientToken>

          <sp:AlgorithmSuite>
            <wsp:Policy>
              <!-- sp:Basic256/-->
              <sp:TripleDesRsa15 />
            </wsp:Policy>
          </sp:AlgorithmSuite>

          <sp:Layout>
            <wsp:Policy>
              <sp:Lax />
            </wsp:Policy>
          </sp:Layout>

        </wsp:Policy>
      </sp:AsymmetricBinding>

      <sp:Wss10
         xmlns:sp="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2005/07/securitypolicy">
        <wsp:Policy>
          <sp:MustSupportRefKeyIdentifier />
          <sp:MustSupportRefIssuerSerial />
        </wsp:Policy>
      </sp:Wss10>

    </wsp:All>
  </wsp:ExactlyOne>
</wsp:Policy>
<!--End of Endpoint Policy-->

<!--Message Policy1-->
<wsp:Policy wsu:Id="Sign_message_policy"
            xmlns:wsp="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2004/09/policy"
            xmlns:wsu="http://docs.oasis-open.org/wss/2004/01/oasis-200401-wss-wssecurity-utility-1.0.xsd">
  <wsp:ExactlyOne>
    <wsp:All>

      <sp:SignedParts
         xmlns:sp="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2005/07/securitypolicy">
        <sp:Body />
      </sp:SignedParts>

    </wsp:All>
  </wsp:ExactlyOne>
</wsp:Policy>

<!--End of Message Policy1-->

You then reference these policies in the binding part of the WSDL. Example:

  <binding name="ExampleServiceSOAP" type="foobar:ExampleServicePort">
    <!-- WS-Security -->
    <wsp:PolicyReference URI="#Endpoint_policy" />
    <soap:binding style="document" transport="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/http"/>
    <operation name="getSomething">
      <soap:operation soapAction="getSomething" style="document"/>
      <input>
        <!-- WS-Security -->
        <wsp:PolicyReference URI="#Sign_message_policy" />
        <soap:body use="literal"/>
      </input>
      <output>
        <soap:body use="literal"/>
      </output>
    </operation>
  </binding>
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The simplest (and the most "portable") thing will be to use HTTP Authentication.

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