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I am trying to use SSL and certificates with a web service (IIS 7, Windows 2008, .NET framework 3.5 SP1). I followed the basic instructions (http://learn.iis.net/page.aspx/144/how-to-set-up-ssl-on-iis-7/) and was able to get the site running soon. However, I can only connect to it from a client if the client has the web server's certificate in its Trusted Root Certification Authorities/Certificates store. If I don't add the certificate on the client site, I get the error "Could not establish trust relationship for the SSL/TLS secure channel with authority" on trying to connect to the service from client.

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That's the correct behavior if you're just using self-signed test certificates. In a public/production environment, your server's certificate would be issued by a common CA like GoDaddy or VeriSign, which you have to pay to obtain.

Most (client) machines already have a large list of updated CA in their trusted root such as GoDaddy, and so a server certificate signed by them for your site will validate as a valid certificate on most* machines (without you needing to provide your cert as a trusted root).

*Most, meaning that there are browsers & operating systems which may be missing (or need updates) on common certificate authorities in their trusted root store.

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Where did you get this certificate? If it's not a child of one of the certificates in the root authority already I sure hope you didn't pay money for it. If you're generating them yourself this isn't surprising because nobody trusts your CA server.

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