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I can't seem to get git log --branches to correctly filter its output. It seems as if Git ignores it.

For example, the head of git log --graph --all --decorate, prints:

* commit 3ae0d17538f787bdde68f37f6644ffe9652d8dc1 (HEAD, feature/branch-ignore)
| Author: Chris Lewis <chris@chris.to>
| Date:   Mon Mar 14 17:39:56 2011 -0700
| 
|     Ignore merge commits, as they're going to be duplicating events
|  
* commit 770534e9d77acb03eaf842440c879aec1c5b5500
| Author: Chris Lewis <chris@chris.to>
| Date:   Tue Mar 8 14:39:40 2011 -0800
| 
|     Removed another remote branch check
| 

Let's say I want to filter by master, which should mean these commits are ignored. The head of git log --graph --all --decorate --branches=master, is also:

* commit 3ae0d17538f787bdde68f37f6644ffe9652d8dc1 (HEAD, feature/branch-ignore)
| Author: Chris Lewis <chris@chris.to>
| Date:   Mon Mar 14 17:39:56 2011 -0700
| 
|     Ignore merge commits, as they're going to be duplicating events
|  
* commit 770534e9d77acb03eaf842440c879aec1c5b5500
| Author: Chris Lewis <chris@chris.to>
| Date:   Tue Mar 8 14:39:40 2011 -0800
| 
|     Removed another remote branch check
|  

Git doesn't seem to be filtering. It doesn't seem to make any difference whether --branches is passed with other arguments or not. My Git version is git version 1.7.4.1. Does anyone know how to use this command successfully?

EDIT: All I want to be able to do is get the log of one branch or another, without having to do a checkout first.

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2  
Interesting question. None of the comments below so far address what --branches is supposed to do or how it's supposed to work. –  Steve Bennett May 15 '12 at 1:52
    
I have added an answer which now explains why it does work correctly even though it appeared not to be. –  Adam Spiers Feb 5 at 0:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Firstly, (the other) Adam is right that it doesn't make sense to use --all for this: if you only want to see one branch like your question states, why ask for all branches?

Secondly, as already stated in comments to other answers, you don't need --branches; just do git log mybranch.

Thirdly, I can explain why git log --branches=mybranch doesn't work. The git-log(1) man page says:

--branches[=<pattern>]
    Pretend as if all the refs in refs/heads are listed on
    the command line as <commit>. If <pattern> is given, 
    limit branches to ones matching given shell glob. If 
    pattern lacks ?, *, or [, /* at the end is implied.

The last sentence is the crucial point here. If the <pattern> is just mybranch then there is no globbing character, so git-log interprets it as if you'd typed

git log --branches=mybranch/*

which only matches references under $repo/.git/refs/heads/mybranch/*, i.e. branches which begin with mybranch/.

There is a dirty hack to prevent the /* from being assumed:

git log --branches=[m]ybranch

but I can't think of any good reason why you would want to do this rather than just typing

git log mybranch
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Because you specified --all, you override any branch specifications you made.

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2  
The lack of a warning seems to be a usability bug to me. –  nes1983 Mar 15 '11 at 19:54
2  
As I mentioned in the question, it doesn't seem to make any difference if I use other flags or not. git log --branches=master gives the same commits back (formatted differently, obviously). It just isn't working. –  cflewis Mar 15 '11 at 21:27
3  
@Lewisham: If you want only master, use git log master. –  Jefromi Mar 15 '11 at 22:40
    
git log branch1 branch2 –  Adam Dymitruk Mar 16 '11 at 1:01
    
That would show you what you want. No need to use --branches –  Adam Dymitruk Mar 16 '11 at 1:02

Does anyone know how to use this command successfully?

EDIT: All I want to be able to do is get the log of one branch or another, without having to do a checkout first.

In order to visualise the graph of commits on all branches and remotes do this:

$ git log --graph --branches=* --remotes=* --decorate

Use this with other git-log options to control verbosity, e.g. --oneline, --name-status, etc.

You may have to fetch remote changes first in order to see them. You can fetch all remote changes without applying them to your current branch(es) like this:

$ git fetch --all
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Let's say your history looked like this

  d -- e [refs/tags/release1]
 /
a -- b -- c [refs/heads/master]
      \
       f -- g [refs/heads/dev1]
        \
         h [refs/heads/dev2]

If you do git log --branches it's the same git log master dev1 dev2, so you'll see commits a,b,c,f,g and h. If you did git log release1 --branches=dev* it's the same as git log release1 dev1 dev2. You'll see a,d,e,b,f,g, and h, but not c.

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