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I'm posting this question again because I think I may have worded it poorly last time, and the solution I thought was working, isn't.

I have 3 tables: Projects, Services, and Recommendations. Recommendations provides the many-to-many relationship between Projects and Services, i.e. each row in Recommendations has a project_id and a service_id.

Let's say there are 1000 projects, and 5 services. I would expect no greater than 5000 records in my Recommendations table, but almost certainly fewer (i.e. some projects have no service recommendations). So, for project #1, if all 5 services have been recommended, I would see 5 rows in the Recommendations table like:

project_id   service_id
1            1
1            2
1            3
1            4
1            5

What I am trying to do is build a query that shows me which projects do NOT have all 5 services recommended, and which those are. So let's say project #1 only had the first 3 services recommended; the output of my query showing which ones are missing might look like:

project_id   service_id
1            4
1            5

Thanks!

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Prev question: stackoverflow.com/questions/5169625/… –  JNK Mar 15 '11 at 20:07
2  
If you reference a prior question older than an hour or so, it's nice to include a link, especially when you say the prior answer didn't work :) –  JNK Mar 15 '11 at 20:08
1  
Indeed, sorry! Noted for future reference :P –  David Mar 15 '11 at 20:10
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted
Select P.project_id, S.service_id
From Projects As P
    Cross Join Services As S
Where Not Exists    (
                    Select 1
                    From Recommendations As R1
                    Where R1.project_id = P.project_id
                        And R1.service_id = S.service_id
                    )

Another variant which should work in MySQL

Select P.project_id, S.service_id
From Projects As P
    Cross Join Services As S
Where (P.project_id, S.service_id) Not In   (
                                            Select R1.project_Id, R1.service_id
                                            From Recommendations As R1
                                            )
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@Joe Stefanelli - Actually, from what I have read it is Inner Join that can behave like a Cross Join if you do not use an On clause or Where clause that joins the keys. –  Thomas Mar 15 '11 at 20:12
    
@Joe Stefanelli - From the docs, basically you can use a Cross Join to behave like an Inner Join if you include an On clause or Where clause. That's fine. Either way, I want the Cartesian product which I'll get without an On or Where. –  Thomas Mar 15 '11 at 20:14
    
@Thomas: I stand (OK, I'm actually sitting) corrected. I'll drop the comment and +1. –  Joe Stefanelli Mar 15 '11 at 20:15
    
@Thomas, I fixed some typos in your second query and it works now. –  Ike Walker Mar 15 '11 at 20:17
    
@Ike Walker - Cool. Thank you! –  Thomas Mar 15 '11 at 20:24
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UPDATE now that I read the question correctly. I'll still use an outer join, but no sub-query this time:

SELECT p.project_id,s.service_id
FROM projects p
cross join services s
LEFT OUTER JOIN recommendations r on r.project_id = p.project_id and r.service_id = s.service_id
WHERE r.project_id IS NULL
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1  
Fixed my query now. –  Ike Walker Mar 15 '11 at 20:21
    
Thanks Ike! Yours worked as well, but I gave it to Thomas simply because I started using his solution first. +1 –  David Mar 15 '11 at 20:40
    
No problem. They will return the exact same data, but I recommend that you compare the performance of the two queries. I expect mine to be at least 40% faster. –  Ike Walker Mar 15 '11 at 20:57
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A fairly simplistic option is this:

select project_id, count(*)
from recommendations
group by project_id
having count(distinct service_id) < (select count(*) from services)
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