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So, in a single parent inheritance model what's the best solution for making code extensible for future changes while keeping the same interface (I'd like to emphasize the fact that these changes cannot be known at the time of the original implementation, the main focus of my question is to explore the best mechanism/pattern for supporting these changes as they come up)? I know that this is a very basic OO question and below I provide example of how I've been going about it, but I was wondering if there a better solution to this common problem.

Here's what I've been doing (the example code is in Java):

In the beginning, the following two classes and interface are created:

public class Foo
{
    protected int z;
}

public interface FooHandler
{
    void handleFoo(Foo foo);
}

public class DefaultFooHandler implements FooHandler
{
    @Override
    public void handleFoo(Foo foo)
    {
        //do something here
    }
}

The system uses variables/fields of type FooHandler only and that object (in this case DefaultFooHandler) is created in a few, well-defined places (perhaps there's a FooHandlerFactory) so as to compensate for any changes that might happen in the future.

Then, at some point in the future a need to extend Foo arises to add some functionality. So, two new classes are created:

public class ImprovedFoo extends Foo
{
    protected double k;
}

public class ImprovedFooHandler extends DefaultFooHandler
{
    @Override
    public void handleFoo(Foo foo)
    {
        if(foo instanceof ImprovedFoo)
        {
            handleImprovedFoo((ImprovedFoo)foo);
            return;
        }
        if(foo instanceof Foo)
        {
            super.handleFoo(foo);
            return;
        }
    }

    public void handleImprovedFoo(ImprovedFoo foo)
    {
        //do something involving ImprovedFoo
    }
}

The thing that makes me cringe in the example above is the if-statements that appear in ImprovedFooHandler.handleFoo

Is there a way to avoid using the if-statements and the instanceof operator?

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2  
Are you looking for the Visitor Pattern? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visitor_pattern –  Erik Mar 15 '11 at 20:06
    
@Erik, you should post it as answer) –  Stas Kurilin Mar 15 '11 at 20:08
    
@Stas: Then I'd have to summarize the pattern - someone else do it instead :) –  Erik Mar 15 '11 at 20:20
    
@Manos ImprovedFoo extends Foo. –  Stas Kurilin Mar 15 '11 at 20:22
    
The first question should be why you don't want to add the functionality to Foo. Your reasoning there will determine the correct way to approach the problem. –  Winston Ewert Mar 15 '11 at 21:34

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First of all the code you wrote won't work. Each time you see instanceof and if...else together be very careful. The order of these checks is very important. In your case you'll never execute handleImpovedFoo. Guess why :)

It's absolutely normal you have these instanceof statements. Sometimes it's the only way to provide different behavior for a subtype. But here you can use another trick: use simple Map. Map classes of foo-hierarchy to instances of fooHandler-hierarchy.

Map<Class<? extends Foo>, FooHandler> map ...

map.put( Foo.class, new FooHandler() );
map.put( ImprovedFoo.class, new ImprovedFooHandler() );

Foo foo ...; // here comes an unknown foo 

map.get( foo.getClass() ).handleFoo( foo );
share|improve this answer
    
As I mentioned in my other comments, I think this approach is best. Especially, when combined with the strategy pattern. Although, in this case "foo" that is passed to the appropriate FooHandler would have to be downcasted to the appropriate type which that particular FooHandler deals with. How's that sound to you? –  Andrey Mar 16 '11 at 17:15
    
There's nothing you can do about this downcast. So stop worrying and use it. –  user381105 Mar 16 '11 at 21:50
    
I hope you aren't afraid of downcasts in general ^) –  user381105 Mar 16 '11 at 22:12
    
agreed. i wouldn't say I'm afraid of downcasts but my gut feeling everytime I see downcasts is that something is wrong. there's a way to somewhat skirt around the downcast by using generics and have each new type of FooHandler specify which type of Foo it's handling: FooHandler<F extends Foo>, DefaultFooHandler<Foo>, ImprovedFooHandler<ImprovedFoo> –  Andrey Mar 17 '11 at 17:37
    
for anyone looking for an answer to a similar question, please also consider Winston Ewert's solution as an alternative –  Andrey Mar 28 '11 at 21:16

In situations like this I usually use a factory to get the appropriate FooHandler for the type of Foo that I have. In this case there would still be a set of ifs but they would be in the factory not the implementation of the handler.

share|improve this answer
    
Why you do not use Visitor pattern, as Eric mentioned? –  Stas Kurilin Mar 15 '11 at 20:11
    
I don't like callbacks and I didn't get the impression that he needed to store state and/or possibly process a single item using more than one handler. However I'm no DP expert. –  mattx Mar 15 '11 at 20:40
    
the implementation of this approach seems like a combination of a couple of other answers - using Map and the Strategy pattern, the Map object would contain Class objects as keys and the appropriate type of FooHandler as values. That's what you mean, right? –  Andrey Mar 16 '11 at 15:12

Yes, don't violate LSP which is what you appear to be doing here. Have you considered the Strategy pattern?

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Sorry. Where is he trying to violate LSP? –  user381105 Mar 15 '11 at 20:41
    
Where he's interrogating the type of the passed object. You should always be able to treat a Foo as a Foo. –  JohnOpincar Mar 15 '11 at 21:03
    
In this context Foo is quite substitutable for ImprovedFoo. He just have to make sure the same is true for all other contexts. –  user381105 Mar 15 '11 at 21:18
    
I'm not sure I would call my code a violation of LSP. What I'm trying to accomplish is to execute the logic appropriate to the type of the argument passed. I can still substitute ImprovedFoo for Foo. However, substituting Foo for ImprovedFoo is most certainly undesirable and will definitely break the code... which is fine since it's not a violation of the LSP. Or am I missing something? Strategy pattern might work if combined with Map (as pavelrappo suggested in his answer) –  Andrey Mar 16 '11 at 15:04
    
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liskov_substitution_principle. Regardless, I find almost any run-time interrogation of a type to determine a specific subclass poor code. –  JohnOpincar Mar 18 '11 at 16:36

The best way of handling this depends too much on the individual case to provide a general solution. So I'm going to provide a number of examples and how I would solve them.

Case 1: Virtual File System

Clients of your code implement virtual file systems which enable them to operate any sort of resource which can be made to look like a file. They do so by implementing the following interface.

interface IFolder
{
     IFolder subFolder(String Name);
     void delete(String filename);
     void removeFolder(); // must be empty
     IFile openFile(String Name);
     List<String> getFiles();
}

In the next version of your software you want to add the ability to remove a directory and all it contents. Call it removeTree. You cannot simply add removeTree to IFolder because that will break all users of IFolder. Instead:

interface IFolder2 implements IFolder
{
     void removeTree();    
}

Whenever a client registers an IFolder (rather then IFolder2), register

new IFolder2Adapter(folder)

Instead, and use IFolder2 throughout your application. Most of your code should not be concerned with the difference about what old versions of IFolder supported.

Case 2: Better Strings

You have a string class which supports various functionality.

class String
{
     String substring(int start, end);
}

You decide to add string searching, in a new version and thus implement:

class SearchableString extends String
{
    int find(String);
}

That's just silly, SearchableString should be merged into String.

Case 3: Shapes

You have a shape simulation, which lets you get the areas of shapes.

class Shape
{
    double Area();
    static List<Shape> allShapes; // forgive evil staticness
}

Now you introduce a new kind of Shape:

class DrawableShape extends Shape
{
    void Draw(Painter paint);
}

We could add a default empty Draw method to Shape. But it seems incorrect to have Shape have a Draw method because shapes in general aren't intended to be drawn. The drawing really needs a list of DrawableShapes not the list of Shapes that is provided. In fact, it may be that DrawableShape shouldn't be a Shape at all.

Case 4: Parts

Suppose that we have a Car:

class Car
{
    Motor getMotor();
    Wheels getWheels();
}

void maintain(Car car)
{
    car.getMotor().changeOil();
    car.getWheels().rotate();
}

Of course, you know somewhere down the road, somebody will make a better car.

class BetterCar extends Car
{
    Highbeams getHighBeams();
}

Here we can make use of the visitor pattern.

void maintain(Car car)
{
     car.visit( new Maintainer() );
}

The car passes all of its component parts to calls into ICarVisitor interface allowing the Maintainer class to maintain each component.

Case 5: Game Objects We have a game with a variety of objects which can be seen on screen

class GameObject
{
   void Draw(Painter painter);
   void Destroy();
   void Move(Point point);
}

Some of our game objects need the ability to perform logic on a regular interval, so we create:

class LogicGameObject extends GameObject
{
    void Logic();
}

How do we call Logic() on all of the LogicGameObjects? In this case, adding an empty Logic() method to GameObject seems like the best option. Its perfectly within the job description of a GameObject to expect it to be able to know what to do for a Logic update even if its nothing.

Conclusion

The best way of handling this situations depends on the individual situation. That's why I posed the question of why you didn't want to add the functionality to Foo. The best way of extending Foo depends on what exactly you are doing. What are you seeing with the instanceof/if showing up is a symptom that you haven't extended the object in the best way.

share|improve this answer
    
1) Assuming there's an existing code-base and the ImprovedFoo objects are added to support new features merging is not really an option. 2) I'm not sure why you think adapting Foo as opposed to extending it is better, could you elaborate more? 3) See my comment to DarenW's answer. –  Andrey Mar 16 '11 at 15:09
    
@Andrey, In the second scenario ImprovedFoo still exists. The assumption here is that old versions of Foo are being provided by an external source. The adapter turns Foo objects into ImprovedFoo objects. It only makes sense in the scenario that somebody else is implementing your interfaces. –  Winston Ewert Mar 16 '11 at 15:32
    
Why would you turn Foo into ImprovedFoo? The idea is to keep Foo as they are and add support for ImprovedFoo at the same time. –  Andrey Mar 16 '11 at 17:07
    
@Andrey, I've rewritten my answer to better explain when that makes sense. There are cases where you don't want to support the original interface anymore. In those cases, the adapter makes sense. –  Winston Ewert Mar 16 '11 at 19:20
    
wow. the last edit turned your reply into a very thorough answer that takes into consideration several contexts, you definitely deserve an up-vote. give me a bit to read it closely and digest it. –  Andrey Mar 17 '11 at 17:53

This looks like a plain simple case for basic polymorphism.Give Foo a method named something like DontWorryI'llHandleThisMyself() (um, except without the apostrophe, and a more sensible name). The FooHandler just calls this method of whatever Foo it's given. Derived classes of Foo override this method as they please. The example in the question seems to have things inside-out.

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I would disagree with this approach. In my mind, there's no reason to add behavior to Foo. Besides, whatever is done to Foo in handleFoo may require other information that Foo might not "know" about - which would become a question of encapsulation –  Andrey Mar 16 '11 at 15:06

With the visitor pattern you could do something like this,

abstract class absFoo {}
class Foo extends absFoo
{
    protected int z;

}
class ImprovedFoo extends absFoo
{
    protected double k;

}
interface FooHandler {
    void accept(IFooVisitor visitor, absFoo foo);
}
class DefaultFooHandler implements FooHandler
{
    public void accept(IFooVisitor visitor, absFoo foo)
    {
        visitor.visit(this, foo);
    }
    public void handleFoo(absFoo foo) {
        System.out.println("DefaultFooHandler");
    }
 }
class ImprovedFooHandler implements FooHandler
{
    public void handleFoo(absFoo foo)
    {
        System.out.println("ImprovedFooHandler");
    }

    public void accept(IFooVisitor visitor, absFoo foo) {
        visitor.visit(this, foo);
    }

}

interface IFooVisitor {
    public void visit(DefaultFooHandler fooHandler, absFoo foo);
    public void visit(ImprovedFooHandler fooHandler, absFoo foo);
}

class FooVisitor implements IFooVisitor{
    public void visit(DefaultFooHandler fHandler, absFoo foo) {
        fHandler.handleFoo(foo);
    }

    public void visit(ImprovedFooHandler iFhandler, absFoo foo) {
        iFhandler.handleFoo(foo);
    }


}

public class Visitor {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        absFoo df = new Foo();
        absFoo idf = new ImprovedFoo();

        FooHandler handler = new ImprovedFooHandler();

        IFooVisitor visitor = new FooVisitor();
        handler.accept(visitor, idf);

    }
}

But this does not guarantee only Foo can be passed to DefaultFooHandler. It allows ImprovedFoo also can be passed to DefaultFooHandler. To overcome, something similar can be done

class Foo
{
    protected int z;

}
class ImprovedFoo
{
    protected double k;

}

interface FooHandler {
    void accept(IFooVisitor visitor);
}

class DefaultFooHandler implements FooHandler
{
    private Foo iFoo;

    public DefaultFooHandler(Foo foo) {
        this.iFoo = foo;
    }

    public void accept(IFooVisitor visitor)
    {
        visitor.visit(this);
    }
    public void handleFoo() {
        System.out.println("DefaultFooHandler");
    }
 }

class ImprovedFooHandler implements FooHandler
{
    private ImprovedFoo iFoo;

    public ImprovedFooHandler(ImprovedFoo iFoo) {
        this.iFoo = iFoo;
    }

    public void handleFoo()
    {
        System.out.println("ImprovedFooHandler");
    }

    public void accept(IFooVisitor visitor) {
        visitor.visit(this);
    }

}

interface IFooVisitor {
    public void visit(DefaultFooHandler fooHandler);
    public void visit(ImprovedFooHandler fooHandler);
}

class FooVisitor implements IFooVisitor{
    public void visit(DefaultFooHandler fHandler) {
        fHandler.handleFoo();
    }

    public void visit(ImprovedFooHandler iFhandler) {
        iFhandler.handleFoo();
    }


}
public class Visitor {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        FooHandler handler = new DefaultFooHandler(new Foo());
        FooHandler handler2 = new ImprovedFooHandler(new ImprovedFoo());

        IFooVisitor visitor = new FooVisitor();
        handler.accept(visitor);

        handler2.accept(visitor);

    }
}
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But I guess you are not allowed to edit Foo and DefaultFooHandler. If thats the case this solution is not useful. –  kalyan Mar 17 '11 at 19:40

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