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I have the following inheritance chain:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print 'Foo'

class Bar(Foo):
    def __init__(self):
        print 'Bar'
        super(Foo, self).__init__()

class Baz(Bar):
    def __init__(self):
        print 'Baz'
        super(Bar, self).__init__()

When instantiating Baz class the output is:

Baz

Foo

Why isn't Bar's constructor isn't called?

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Works for me, but copy-pasting showed messed up indentation in the super() line in Bar. Is that possibly your problem? –  Chinmay Kanchi Mar 15 '11 at 22:33
    
@ChinmayKanchi: How on earth did this code work for you? –  the_drow Mar 16 '11 at 12:37
    
LOL, probably because I typed it in myself rather than copy-pasting, once I realised the indentation was messed up. My mind obviously corrected the mistakes automagically. –  Chinmay Kanchi Mar 16 '11 at 12:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The call to super() takes the current class as the first argument, not the super class (super() works that out for itself). In this case, the following should fix it... note the change to both super() calls:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print 'Foo'

class Bar(Foo):
    def __init__(self):
        print 'Bar'
        super(Bar, self).__init__()

class Baz(Bar):
    def __init__(self):
        print 'Baz'
        super(Baz, self).__init__()
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