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From the DailyJS "Let's build a JavaScript Framework" I'm not quite sure on the following code, obviously used as a global abatement technique.

My understanding so far balks at (function(){}) . I understand setting the turing var up, setting global.turing to turing, and return either window or this (if not in a browser), but the (function(global){})(this or window) thing confuses me...I've seen things like

var mything = {} and setting all your code up under mything, but this idiom confuses me a little.

I really want to understand the reasoning here vs memorizing that it "works out"

(function(global) {
  var turing = {
    VERSION: '0.0.1',
    lesson: 'Part 1: Library Architecture'
  };

  if (global.turing) {
    throw new Error('turing has already been defined');
  } else {
    global.turing = turing;
  }
})(typeof window === 'undefined' ? this : window);
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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Think of this:

(function (x) {
    // ...
})(y);

as:

function functionName(x) {
    // ...
}
functionName(y);

but without the need to give it a name (like functionName).

So this:

(function(global) {
    // ...
})(typeof window === 'undefined' ? this : window);

is really just:

function functionName(global) {
    // ...
}
functionName(typeof window === 'undefined' ? this : window);

It is a function with one argument (called global within the function) and it is called with typeof window === 'undefined' ? this : window which means the same as:

function functionName(global) {
    // ...
}
if (typeof window === 'undefined') {
    functionName(this);
} else {
    functionName(window);
}

but using a shorter notation (and without naming the function).

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I think I get it, thanks –  Richard Holland Mar 15 '11 at 22:44
    
Great explanation! Thanks! –  BigDave Mar 15 '11 at 22:49

This is an anonymous or lambda function. Most languages support this.

Using an anonymous function is really a matter of preference for the author. Without setting up an anonymous function to deal with the return value of a prior call, you would have to allocate additional memory on the client side by initializing a variable to contain the returned object and then pass it to a globally declared function later on in a serial manner.

If it is a 1 time function, it saves space, memory, time.

As a side-note: You can probably get a better feeling for this by googling around for some of the concepts behind functional programming. Lambda functions seem to be all the rage lately, especially in Python.

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"Lambda functions seem to be all the rage" -- it's cause we can program in something other than Lisp. :-) –  Jason S Mar 15 '11 at 23:04

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