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I probably have my terminology wrong, but could someone explain why we need to wrap the main method in a class? It seems rather redundant to me. Could you then extend this class again, complete with a main?

package bears;

import bears.Bear; 

// what's the point of this Class here?
public class MakeBear {     

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        int age;
        String name;
        Bear MyBear = new Bear("Jim", "brown", 12, 50); // constructor

        age = MyBear.getAge();
        name = MyBear.getName();

        System.out.println("The bear is called" + name +
                              " and is " + age + " years old!");
    }

Also, is the above an acceptable way of structuring a program- that is, calling the constructor of the Bear class in the main method, as well as redeclaring variables like so?

Just starting out so it's a little bit foreign to me.

Part of my Bear class, if it's relevant:

public class Bear {
    private String name;
    private String colour;
    private int age;
    private int weight;

    public Bear(String bearName, String bearColour, int bearAge, int bearWeight)
    {
        name = bearName;
        colour = bearColour;
        age = bearAge;
        weight = bearWeight;    
    }
      // get/set methods

thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

main has to be in a class because everything in Java is a class.

In your simple example typically the main function would be in the Bear class. The MakeBear class is unnecessary.

It would be re-written like this.

public class Bear {
    private String name;
    private String colour;
    private int age;
    private int weight;

    public Bear(String bearName, String bearColour, int bearAge, int bearWeight)
    {
        name = bearName;
        colour = bearColour;
        age = bearAge;
        weight = bearWeight;    
    }

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Bear myBear = new Bear("Jim", "brown", 12, 50); // constructor
        System.out.println("The bear is called" + myBear.getName() +
                              " and is " + myBear.getAge() + " years old!");
    }
}
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thanks, would +1 if I had the rep. I'm reading through the Oracle Java tutorials, and unless I'm mistaken, they had structured an example much like my code, so assumed this was a convention. Your answer makes a lot of sense in any case! –  calum Mar 15 '11 at 23:16
1  
@calum - it is a toy example intended to illustrate different things; i.e. how to create and use objects, not how to design the ideal main program. It is a bad idea to pick random tutorial code and try to use it as an examplar of good practice. (And I'm in no way faulting this particular example. Far from it. It serves its real purpose better the way it is.) –  Stephen C Mar 15 '11 at 23:28

First of all, everything you write is a class in Java. It isn't a universal law of computing or even OO, it's just the way the language was designed.

Secondly, main() isn't a special method, it's just the first method that is called when you execute a Java program from the command line.

For simple programs, containing a handful of classes and not dealing with command line arguments you can put your main() method in pretty much any class where it roughly makes sense. (In your example, the Bear class is just as good.)

But for larger programs it's a good idea to have a dedicated main class which does nothing else but processes command line arguments, displays usage information and CLA errors and creates one instance of another class (the real entry point of your application) and starts it off.

So although in your example MakeBear is indeed pointless and you could move the main() method into Bear, in a bigger application it wouldn't be.

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Thanks, would +1 if had the rep! –  calum Mar 15 '11 at 23:17

Thats where the Object Oriented Concept comes in - everything is an object which is an instance of a class. Everything in Java program must be in a class. JVM uses the static main method to start the main thread of the application. It depends on what you want to do with those variables. In your code, you can directly print the variables without assigning them to a variable like

System.out.println("The bear is called" + myBear.getName() +
                          " and is " + myBear.getAge() + " years old!");

Ideally, you should combine your Bear and MakeBear class as MakeBear as per your example doesn't do anything.

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